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MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, MA 



ry 



3 1848 00207 6540 

Town Of Medfield 




Annual Town Report 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2012 



Robert McCarthy Memorial 



On September 17, 2011 a dedication ceremony and unveiling was 
held for the Robert McCarthy Memorial at the site of his old 
Blacksmith Shop on Janes Avenue. This historical marker 
commemorates not only Mr. McCarthy but memorializes the history 
of blacksmithing in Medfield. The monument was the idea of Mr. 
Myron McLane who had the privilege of being an apprentice under 
Mr. McCarthy and continues to operate a blacksmith shop in the 
area. 

The monument features a 225 pound anvil which was purchased by 
Mr. McCarthy in 1931 and remained in the blacksmith shop until it 
was purchased at auction by Mr. McLane in 1996. 



Printed by Country Press Inc. 
www.countrypressinc.com 



Cover Photograph by: 
Stanley Bergeron 




nd 



362 Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FOR MEDFIELD 



STATE 






Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth 

District 

James E. Timilty 

State House Room 518 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1222 

james.timilty@masenate.gov 

Representative in General Court 

13* Norfolk District, Precinct 1 & 2 

Denise Garlick 

State House Room 473G 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2070 

Denise.Garlick@mahouse.gov 

Representative in General Court 

9th Norfolk District, Precinct 3 & 4 

Daniel Winslow 

State House Room 33 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2060 

Daniel.Winslow@mahouse.gov 



Governor's Councillor 

2 nd District 
Robert L. Jubinville 
State House Room 1 84 
Boston, MA 02133 
(617)725-4015x2 
jubinville@comcast.net 



FEDERAL 




U.S. Representative to Congress, 9 th District 
Stephen F. Lynch 

88 Black Falcon Avenue, Suite 340 
Boston, MA 02210 
(617)428-2000 
stephen.lynch@mail.house.gov 

United States Senator 

Scott Brown 

2400 J.F.K. Federal Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 



United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 



Floor 



1 Bowdoin Square, 10 
Boston, MA 02114 
(617)565-8519 
john_kerry@kerry.senate.gov 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 




Population 


12,548 as of December 31, 2012 




County 


Norfolk 




Size 


14.43 square miles 




Miles of Highway 


74.72 




Elevation 


1 80 feet above sea level at the Town House 




Registered Voters 


8,563 as of December 31, 2012 






Democrats 


1,711 




Republicans 


1,456 




No Party or Designation 


5,371 




Other 


25 


Government 


Board of Selectmen 





Official Notices 



Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 
Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on 
the Town House bulletin board 



Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 



Library Hours 

Winter Hours 
September to May 

Summer Hours 
June to August 



Transfer Station 

Summer Hours 



15.73 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/1 1-6/30/12) 
15.73 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/12-6/30/13) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1:00 PM 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:30AM to 6PM 

Tuesday, Thursday 10:30PM to 9PM 

Saturday 10:30AM to 5PM, Sunday 2PM to 5PM 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:30AM to 6PM 
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30AM to 9PM 
Saturday 10:30AM to 2PM, Sunday Closed 

Wednesday, Friday & Saturday, 9 AM to 4 PM 
Wednesday 9AM to 7PM, Friday & Saturday 9AM to 4PM 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2012 



Elected Officials 




Park and Recreation Comi 


mission 


Moderator 




Mel Seibolt 


2013 


Scott F. McDermott 


2013 


Kirsten Young 


2013 






Nicholas Brown 


2013 


Town Clerk 




Robert Tatro 


2014 


Carol A. Mayer 


2015 


Thomas A. Caragliano 


2015 


Board of Selectmen 




Housing Authority 




Ann B. Thompson 


2013 


Neil Duross 


2013 


Mark L. Fisher 


2014 


Lisa Donovan 


2014 


Osier P. Peterson 


2015 


Eldred Whyte 


2015 






Roberta Lynch 


2015 


Board of Assessors 




Eileen DeSorgher, state a PP t. 


2016 


R. Edward Beard 


2013 






Francis W. Perry 


2014 


Trust Fund Commission 




Thomas Sweeney 


2015 


Gregory Reid 


2013 






H. Tracy Mitchell 


2014 


School Committee 




Georgia Colivas 


2015 


Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2013 






Christopher Morrison 


2013 


Appointed by the 




Eileen Desisto 


2014 


Board of Selectmen 




Debra Noschese 


2014 


Fire Chief 




Maryann Sullivan 


2015 


William A. Kingsbury 


2013 


Trustees of the Public 




Chief of Police 




Library 




Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2015 


James J. Whalen 


2013 






Robert Luttman 


2013 


Sergeants 




Lauren Feeney 


2014 


John L. Mayer 


2013 


Timothy Hughes 


2014 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2013 


Maura Y. McNicholas 


2015 


Ray M. Burton 


2013 


Steven Pelosi 


2015 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2013 






Lorna C. Fabbo 


2013 


Planning Board (5 Years) 








Wright Dickinson 


2013 


Police Officers 




Elissa G. Franco 


2014 


Larz C. Anderson 


2013 


George N. Lester 


2015 


Michelle Bento 


2013 


Stephen J. Browne 


2016 


Christine DiNatale 


2013 


Keith Diggans 


2017 


Robert G. Flaherty 


2013 






Dana P. Friend 


2013 






John D. Geary 


2013 



Stephen H. Grover 


2013 


Tree Warden 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2013 


Edward M. Hinkley 


James O'Neil 


2013 




Wayne Sallale 


2013 


Field Driver and Fence 

John Naff 


Town Administrator 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Animal Control Officer 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 



Treasurer/Collector 

Georgia K. Colivas 



2013 



Inspector of Animals 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 



2013 



2013 



2013 



2013 



Superintendent of Public Works 



Kenneth P. Feeney 


2015 


Norfolk County Advisory Board 






Representative 




Town Accountant 




Kenneth P. Feeney 


2013 


Joy Ricciuto 


2015 


Pound Keeper 




Town Counsel 




Jennifer Shaw Gates 


2013 


Mark G. Cerel 


2015 


Inspection Department 




Board of Health (3 yr) 




John Naff, Building Commissioner 


2015 


Kathleen Rose 


2013 


Joseph Doyle, Alternate Building 


2013 


Wendy Jackson 


2014 


Peter Navis 


2013 


Marcia Aigler 


2015 


John A. Rose, Jr 


2013 


Ann Fryer, resigned 


2013 


James J. Leonard 


2013 






Peter Diamond 


2013 


Cemetery Commissioners (Syr) 






Frank Iafolla 


2013 


Town Greeter 




Al Manganello 


2014 


Joseph E. Ryan 


2013 



Thomas Sweeney 2015 

Robert Gregg 2015 

David Temple, Associate 20 1 2 

Board of Water and Sewerage (Syr) 

Gary A. Lehmann 2013 

Willis Peligian 2014 

Jeremy Marsette 20 1 5 

Christian Carpenter, Associate 20 1 3 
William Harvey, Associate 2013 

Superintendent of Insect Pest 
Control 

Edward M. Hinkley 20 1 3 



Town Historian 

Richard P. DeSorgher 2013 

Keepers of the Town Clock 

Marc R. Tishler 2013 

David P. Maxson 2013 

Board of Registrars (3 yr) 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 2013 

L. David Alinsky 2014 

William Gallagher 2015 

Veterans' Service Officer (3yr) 
Ronald Clark Griffin 20 1 5 



Sealer of Weights and Measures (3) 


Paul J. Adams (Millis) 


2013 


Michael J. Clancy 


2015 


George Bent (Norfolk) 


2013 






Dale Bickford (Millis) 


2013 


Measurer of Wood and Bark (3) 


Herbert Bun- 


2013 


Michael J. Clancy 


2015 


Ray M. Burton, III 


2013 






Jonathan M. Caroll (Norfolk) 


2013 


Public Weigher (3) 




Jon Cave 


2013 


Michael J. Clancy 


2015 


Ryan Chartrand (Norfolk) 


2013 






Sandra Cronin 


2013 


Constables and Keepers 


of the 


William J. Davis (Norfolk) 


2013 


Lockup 




Thomas G. Degnim (Norfolk) 


2013 


Larz C. Anderson 


2013 


Robert A. Dixon (Millis) 


2013 


Michelle Bento 


2013 


Louis DrOSte (Norfolk) 


2013 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2013 


William J. Dwyer (Millis) 


2013 


Ray M. Burton, Jr. 


2013 


David J. Eberle (Norfolk) 


2013 


Christine DiNatale 


2013 


Leo Either (Norfolk) 


2013 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2013 


Glen R. Eykel (Norfolk) 


2013 


Robert B. Flaherty 


2013 


Edgardo Feliciano, Jr. 


2013 


Dana P. Friend 


2013 


Nathan Fletcher (Norfolk) 


2013 


John D. Geary 


2013 


Susan Fornaciari (Norfolk) 


2013 


John F. Gerlach 


2013 


Robert Forsythe (Norfolk) 


2013 


Stephen H. Grover 


2013 


Terence Gallagher (Norfolk) 


2013 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2013 


John Gerlach 


2013 


John L. Mayer 


2013 


Barry Glassman 


2013 


James O'Neil 


2013 


Thomas Hamano 


2013 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2013 


Timothy Heinz (Norfolk) 


2013 


Daniel Pellegrini 


2013 


John Holmes (Norfolk) 


2013 


Wayne Sallale 


2013 


David Holt (Norfolk) 


2013 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2013 


Robert Hoist (Norfolk) 


2013 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2013 


Richard D. Hurley 


2013 






Winslow Karlson III (Norfolk) 


2013 


Police Matrons 




Paul Kearns 


2013 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2013 


Stephen Kirchdorfer 


2013 


Sandra Cronin 


2013 


James C. Kozak (Norfolk) 


2013 


Jennifer A. Shaw Gates 


2013 


Robert LaPlante 


2013 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2013 


James Lopez (Millis) 


2013 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2013 


Peter Lown (Norfolk) 


2013 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2013 


Robert Maraggio (Millis) 


2013 


Audra Wilhelmi 


2013 


Kristofer Maxant (Millis) 


2013 


Mary L. Solari 


2013 


Chris MaClure (Norfolk) 


2013 


Sally Wood 


2013 


David R. McConnell (Norfolk) 


2013 






Peter McGowan (Millis) 


2013 


Special Police Officers 




Nicholas Meleski (Millis) 


2013 


Leo Acerra (Millis) 


2013 


Robert Miller (Norfolk) 


2013 






Paul J. Murphy (Norfolk) 


2013 



Linda Meyers (Minis) 


2013 


Traffic Supervisors 




Robert Nedder 


2013 


Angela Brown 


2013 


Peter Opanasets (Millis) 


2013 


William Fitzpatrick 


2013 


Stephen Plympton (Norfolk) 


2013 


John T. Garvey 


2013 


Amanda Prata (Norfolk) 


2013 


Jennifer A. Gates 


2013 


Thomas Quinn (Millis) 


2013 


John F. Gerlach 


2013 


Kevin Roake (Norfolk) 


2013 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2013 


Christina Sena (Norfolk) 


2013 


Richard D. Hurley 


2013 


Viriato Sena (Norfolk) 


2013 


George W. Kingsbury 


2013 


Robert Shannon (Norfolk) 


2013 


Robert T. LaPlante 


2013 


Paul Smith (Millis) 


2013 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2013 


Christopher Soffayer (Millis) 


2013 


William H. Mann 


2013 


Charles Stone (Norfolk) 


2013 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2013 


Richard Strauss 


2013 


Kevin Robinson 


2013 


Thomas Tabarini 


2013 


Lori Sallee 


2013 


Domenic Tiberi (Millis) 


2013 


Mary L. Solari 


2013 


Eric Van Ness (Norfolk) 


2013 


Richard Strauss 


2013 


Mark Vendetti 


2013 


Thomas E. Tabarini 


2013 


Robert P. Vitale 


2013 


William Walter 


2013 


James Wells 


2013 






Audra Wilhelmi 


2013 


Affordable Housing Committee 


Ryan Wilhelmi 


2013 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2013 


Sally Wood 


2013 


Charles H. Peck 


2013 






Diane L. Maxson 


2013 


Emergency Management , 


\gency 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2013 


Ray M. Burton, Director 


2013 


Joseph Zegarelli 


2013 


Arline F. Berry 


2013 


John W. McGeorge 


2013 


Scott Brooks 


2013 


Fred Bunger 


2013 


Ray M. Burton III 


2013 


Kristine Trierweiler, Ex Officio 


2013 


Jon R. Cave 


2013 


Ann B. Thompson, Ex Officio 


2013 


Norma Cronin 


2013 






Sandra Cronin 


2013 


Council on Aging (3yr) 




Barry Glassman 


2013 


Louis Fellini 


2013 


Neil I. Grossman 


2013 


Patricia Shapiro 


2013 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2013 


Michael Clancy 


2013 


Paul Kearns 


2013 


Neil Duross 


2015 


Richard D. Hurley 


2013 


Virginia Whyte 


2015 


Steven Krichdorfer 


2013 






Charles A. Morreale 


2013 


Americans with Disabilities 




John L. Parsons 


2013 


Compliance Review Committee 


Donald W. Reed 


2013 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2013 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Richard D. Strauss 


2013 


Frederick A. Rogers, resigned 


2012 


James Wells 


2013 


Tina Cosentino 


2013 


Sally Wood 


2013 







Board of Appeals on Zoning (Syr) 



Robert F. Sylvia, resigned 


2013 


Russell J. Hallisey 


2014 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2015 


Charles H. Peck, Assoc 


2013 


Thomas M. Reis, Assoc 


2013 


Douglas C. Boyer, Assoc 


2013 


Medfield Cultural Council (Syr) 


William F. Pope 


2013 


David Temple 


2014 


Diane Wanucha 


2014 


Ron Gustavson 


2015 


Lucinda Davis 


2015 


Jean Mineo 


2015 


Patricia Pembroke 


2015 


Diane Borrelli 


2015 


Susan Parker 


2015 



Constable for Election 

Carol A. Mayer 



2013 



Charles River Natural Storage 
Area Designees 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2013 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Collective Bargaining Team 



Contract Compliance Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Economic Dev. Commission (3) 

Ann B. Thompson 2013 

Paul E. Hinkley 2013 

Joseph Scier 2014 

Patrick Casey 2014 

Charles Peck 2015 

Representative to Regional 
Hazardous Waste Committee 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2012 

Capital Budget Committee 

Mark Fisher 2013 

Maryalice Whalen 2013 

Kristine Trierweiler 2013 

Timothy P. Sullivan 2013 

Joy Ricciuto 2013 

Charles Kellner 2013 



Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2013 


Emergency Medical Services 




Mark Fisher 


2013 


Response Committee 




William Kingsbury 


2013 


David Binder, M.D. 


2013 


Rachel Brown 


2013 


William A. Kingsbury 


2013 


James O'Shaughnessy 


2013 


Joan M. Kiessling 


2013 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2013 


Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2013 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Community Gardens Committee 


Ann B. Thompson 


2013 



Neal Sanders 2013 

Betty Sanders 2013 

Conservation Commission (3yr) 



Ralph Parmigiane 


2013 


Robert Aigler 


2013 


Mary McCarthy 


2013 


Deborah Bero 


2014 


Michael Perloff 


2014 


Philip J. Bun- 


2014 


Robert Kennedy, Jr. 


2015 



Emergency Planning Commission 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2013 

Edward M. Hinkley 2013 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 20 1 3 

William A. Kingsbury 20 1 3 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Ann B. Thompson 2013 

Zoning Enforcement Officer 

John Naff 2013 



Enterprise Fund Committee 

Georgia K. Colivas 2013 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2013 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Jeremy Marsette 2013 

Kristine Trierweiler 2013 

Joy Ricciuto 2013 

Fair Housing Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Geographical Information System 

Robert Kennedy, Jr. 
Sandra H. Frigon 
Gary A. Lehmann 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Michael Perloff 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Kristine M. Trierweiler 
Carol A. Mayer 

Historical Commission (3yr) 

Charles Navratil 

Maria C. Baler 

Ancelin Wolfe 

Burgess P. Standley 

David F. Temple 

Daniel Bibel 

Sarah Murphy 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Assoc 

Deborah Gaines, Associate 

David R. Sharff, Associate 
Michael R. Taylor, Associate 
John A. Thompson, Associate 

Patricia Iafolla Walsh, 

Associate 

Cheryl O'Malley, Assoc 
Douglas Teany, Assoc 

Historic District Commission (Syr) 

Michael Taylor 
Barbara Jacobs 
Connie Sweeney 
David R. Sharff 



Bradley Phipps 



2015 



Insurance Advisory Committee 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Peter Moran 2013 

Rachel Brown 2013 

Selectmen's Insurance Advisory 
Committee 

Peter Moran 2013 

Rachel Brown 2013 



2013 


Employees Insurance Advisory 


2013 


Committee 




2013 


Nancy Deveno 


2013 


2013 


Joanne Schmidt 


2013 


2013 


Paul Norian 


2013 


2013 


Susan Parker 


2013 


2013 


Michelle Bento 


2013 


2013 


John Wilhelmi 


2013 




Joy Ricciuto 


2013 




Malcolm Gibson 


2013 


2013 






2013 


Local Auction Permit Agent 




2013 


Evelyn Clarke 


2013 


2014 






2014 


Local Water Resource 




2015 


Management Official 




2015 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2013 


2013 






2013 


Medfield MBTA Advisory Board 


2013 


Designee 




2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


2013 






2013 


Metropolitan Area Planning 




2013 


Council 




2013 

(1 \ir\ 


Sarah Raposa 

Memorial Day Committee 


2015 


2013 
2on 


Donna Dragotakes 


2013 


Robert E. Meaney 


2013 


2014 
2014 


William A. Kingsbury 


2013 


Albert J. Manganello 


2013 


William H. Mann 


2013 




AnnB. Thompson 


2013 



Michelle Doucette 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Ronald C. Griffin 


2013 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2013 


Evelyn Clarke 


2013 


Ron Gustavson 


2013 


Frank Iafolla 


2013 


Robert Luttman 


2013 



Committee to Study Memorials 

Richard P. DeSorgher 2013 

Ronald C. Griffin 2013 

Jane M. Lomax 2013 

David F. Temple 2013 

Frank Iafolla 2013 

Municipal Census Supervisor 

Carol A. Mayer 2013 



Three Rivers Interlocal Council 
Representative (MAPC) 

Sarah Raposa 2013 

Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 

Georgia Colivas 2013 

Michael J. Sullivan 2013 

Frank Perry 2013 

Roberta Lynch 2013 



Representatives to Neponset 



Downtown Study Committee 



Watershed Initiative Committee 


Robert Dugan 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Brandi Erb 


2013 






Mark Fisher 


2013 


Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 


Matthew J. McCormick 


2013 


Carol A. Mayer 


2013 


Robert MacLeod 


2013 






Nancy Kelly Lavin 


2013 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 


Richard DeSorgher 


2013 


William A. Kingsbury 


2013 


Frank Perry, Associate 


2013 


Wireless Communications 


Study 


Medfield Energy Committee 




Committee 




Lee Alinsky 


2013 


David P. Maxson 


2013 


Fred Bunger 


2013 


Charles Mapps 


2013 


Penni Conner 


2013 


Thomas Powers 


2013 


Fred Davis 


2013 


Christopher Lennon 


2013 


Cynthia Greene 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Maureen Howells 


2013 






Charles Kellner 


2013 


Solid Waste Study Committee 


Marie Nolan 


2013 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2013 


James Redden 


2013 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2013 


Emre Schveighoffer 


2013 


Ann B. Thompson 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 


2013 


Scott Colwell 


2013 


Osier P. Peterson, Ex Officio 


2013 


Anthony Centore 


2013 






Carl Mellea 


2013 


Permanent Building Committee 


Megan Sullivan 


2013 


Timothy Bonfatti 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Thomas Erb 


2013 



Technology Study Committee 

Gary Lehmann 2013 



William Gallagher 2013 

John Nunnari 2013 

Michael Quinlan 2013 



10 



Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 20 1 3 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Ex Officio 20 1 3 

State Hospital Environmental 
Review Committee 

Deborah T. Bero 2013 

William R. Domey 2013 

Ralph Telia 2013 

John Thompson 2013 

Cole Worthy 2013 



Erica Reilly 2013 

Nancy Schiemer 2013 

Theodore Carlson, resigned 2013 

Lester Hartman, MD, ex officio 20 1 3 

Town Bylaw Review Committee 

Elisa G. Franco 2013 

Cynthia Greene 2013 

Russell Hallisey 2013 

Scott McDermott 2013 

Stephen Nolan 2013 



State Hospital Mediation 




Robert Sylvia 


2013 


Committee 




David Wang 


2013 


John Thompson 


2013 






Ann B. Thompson 


2013 


Bay Colony Rail Trail 


Study 


William Massaro 


2013 


Committee 








Albert Brenton 


2013 


Kingsbury Pond Committee 




Christian Dormer 


2013 


Richard Judge 


2013 


Eric Holm 


2013 


Ann Krawec 


2013 


Susan Lynch 


2013 


Garrett Graham 


2013 


Graham Plonski 


2013 


Andrew Spencer 


2013 


Robert Horgan 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 


2013 


Jeremy Marsette 


2013 






George Hinkley 


2013 


Safety Committee 








Christian Dormer 


2013 


Director of Grave Markers for 


Andrew Thompson 


2013 


Veterans 




Robert Meaney 


2013 


Frank Iafolla 


2013 


Kenneth Feeney 


2013 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2013 


Appointed bv the 
Treasurer/Collector 




Open Space and Recreation 




Meline Karapetian 


2013 


Committee 




Susan Cronin 


2013 



Robert Aigler 2013 

Thomas A. Caragliano 2013 

David LaFreniere 20 1 3 

Michael Perloff 2013 

Mel Seibolt 2013 

Lyme Disease Study Committee 

Christine Kaldy 2013 

Lisa Dolan, resigned 20 1 3 

Abby Marble, resigned 20 1 3 

Carolyn Samson 2013 

Frank Perry 2013 



Appointed by the Town Clerk 

Dolores Connors, Assistant 20 1 3 

Appointed by the Chairman of the 
Selectmen, Chairman of the School 
Committee and the Town 
Moderator 

Vocational School Committee 
Representative 

Karl D. Lord June 30, 2013 



11 



Appointed by the Fire Chief 



Personnel Board 



Charles G. Seavey, Deputy chief 


2013 


Christine Connelly 


2013 


David C. 0' Toole, Captain 


2013 


Debra Shuman 


2014 


Jeffrey Bennotti, Lt 


2013 


Rachel Brown, Associate 


2013 


Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2013 










Appointed bv the Planning 


Board 


Appointed bv the Board of Health 






William R. Domey, P.E. 


2013 


Long Range Planning 




Nancy Bennotti 


2013 


Committee (3 yr) 








Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 


2013 


Appointed bv the Moderator 




Peter J. Fellman 


2013 


Deputy Moderator 

Conrad J. Bletzer 


2013 


Margaret H. Gryska 
Burgess P. Standi ey 
Keith R. Diggans 


2013 
2013 
2013 


Warrant Committee 

Gregory Sullivan 
Michael T. Marucci 
James O'Shaughnessy 
Maryalice Whalen 
Joanna Hilvert 


2013 
2013 
2014 
2014 
2014 


Sign Advisory Board (3 yr) 

John Messina 
Thomas D. Erb 
Matthew McCormick 
Jeffrey Hyman 


2013 
2015 
2015 
2015 


Gustave H. Murby 


2015 






Nikolaos Athanasiadis 


2015 






Thomas C. Marie 


2015 






Catherine Steever, resigned 


2012 






David Fischer, resigned 


2012 






Edward Doherty, resigned 


2013 






Thomas J. Schlesinger, 








resigned 


2013 






Permanent School Building and 






Planning Committee 








David Binder 


2013 






C. Richard McCullough 


2013 






Keith Mozer 


2013 






Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2013 






Susan C. Cotter 


2013 






Appointed bv the Town 








Moderator, 








Chairman of the Board of 








Selectmen, and Chairman of the 






Warrant Committee 









12 



MEETING SCHEDULE 



Name 


Day 


Time 


Location 


Annual Town 
Election 


Last Monday in March 


6:00 AM to 
8:00 PM 


Center at 
Medfield 


Annual Town 
Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Appeals Board 


Wednesday as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


3 rd Thursday 


7:30 AM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


2 nd Tuesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannual ly 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical 
Commission 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Housing Authority 


2 nd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Medfield State 


Park and 
Recreation 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Monday 
Monthly (July- August) 


7:30 PM 
7:30 PM 


High School 
High School 


Selectmen 


1 st and 3 rd Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov.-May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



13 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2012 



14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March and elected Ms. Ann B. 
Thompson, Chairman and Mr. Mark L. Fisher, Clerk. Mr. Osier L. Peterson was 
reelected as the third member of the Board. 

Medfield State Hospital 

The environmental cleanup continues to be the focus of attention regarding the 
redevelopment of the Medfield State Hospital. The Board of Selectmen continues 
to rely on SHERC (State Hospital Environmental Review Committee) to provide 
the analysis and monitoring of the cleanup. The Committee is comprised of 
volunteers including three Licensed Site Professionals, an attorney, a 
representative of the Conservation Commission and a representative of the Board 
of Health. This Committee continues to provide the Selectmen with the 
environmental knowledge necessary to understand the cleanup process. The areas 
of focus for the cleanup have included the Salvage Yard and the C&D area. The 
cleanup is being conducted by the Division of Capital Asset Management 
(DCAM) who maintains care and control of the property for the Commonwealth. 
DCAM continues to hold Public Involvement Plan (PIP) meetings to review and 
analyze the environmental issues. 

The ongoing discussions have focused on the cleanup in the area of the Charles 
River. The Town continues to have ongoing discussions regarding the 
appropriate response to cleanup in this area. The Town has been working with 
the MassDEP (MA Department of Environmental Protection), the Charles River 
Watershed Association, and the Army Corp of Engineers in identifying solutions 
to the cleanup that must be done in the area of the Charles River. An extensive 
library of materials regarding the environmental issues has been placed on the 
Town's website and at the Public Library. 

This year DCAM and the Board of Selectmen have entered into mediation to try 
and reach an agreement on the extent of the environmental cleanup that should 
occur at the site. The Board of Selectmen appointed Mr. John Thompson, Mr. 
William Massaro and Ms. Ann Thompson to represent the Town in the mediation 
sessions. The Town has met on a regular basis with DCAM to reach a resolution. 

The current redevelopment plan for the site proposes 440 units of housing which 
includes a mix of senior housing, condominiums, apartments and single family 
homes. The Massachusetts State Legislature has approved the legislation for the 
redevelopment. The Planning Board has been working towards the development 
of an overlay zoning district that would allow for the reuse of the state hospital as 
laid out in the legislation. The overlay district is a zoning change and will require 

15 



a two-thirds vote of a Special Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen appointed 
a new State Hospital Redevelopment Committee to examine the feasibility of 
redevelopment at the site. The Committee has participated in site visits to other 
state hospital communities to learn from those communities that have already 
experienced a redevelopment project. In the spring, the Board of Selectmen 
appointed a new Medfield State Hospital Redevelopment Committee to examine 
the existing redevelopment plan as well as other potential redevelopment 
opportunities for the site. 

Single Stream Recycling 

Single stream recycling continues to improve our recycling numbers! This year 
the Solid Waste Committee has entered into a contract with a new single stream 
provider at the Transfer Station that will result in lower costs for the taxpayer. 
The contract is for the removal of the single stream recycling from the facility 
and should be a seamless transition for residents. 

Personnel 

The Town had several retirements this year. In March of this year Ms. Patti 
Iafolla Walsh retired from the Building and Inspections Department. In 
December after working for over 25 years for the Town, Ms. Norma Cronin 
retired as the administrative assistant to the Planning Board and Zoning Board of 
Appeals. After thirty six years of service, Mr. Peter Iafolla retired from the 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Selectmen wish Ms. Cronin, Ms. Walsh and 
Mr. Iafolla well in their retirement. 

Storms 

In October, the Town experienced wide spread power outages and downed trees 
from Tropical Storm Sandy. The Department of Public Works and the Police and 
Fire Departments worked together to make sure the streets were cleared and the 
residents were safe during and after the storm. 

Capital Projects 

The Medfield Permanent Planning and Building Committee have met regularly to 
continue developing a master plan for several municipal building projects 
including the Town Garage, Police and Fire, and the Dale Street Campus area. 
The Committee anticipates an article at the Annual Town Meeting in 2013 to 
fund the construction of the Town Garage and begin design work for the Police 
and Fire Building. 

The Board of Selectmen encourages all residents of the Town to participate in 
Town government by volunteering, attending meetings and most importantly to 
vote at town elections and attend the Annual Town Meeting. It is you, the 
residents of Medfield that are the legislative body of our local government. 



16 



The Board of Selectmen would like to acknowledge that it is the generous 
contributions by town employees, committee members and countless volunteers 
who assist the Board of Selectmen and the Town in maintaining our small town 
atmosphere. It is this strong sense of community in our Town that continues to 
assure that Medfield will be a desirable place to live now and in the future. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
Mark L. Fisher, Clerk 
Osier L. Peterson 



17 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 3 1st Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Sidewalk Maintenance: The Highway Department continued the sidewalk 
maintenance program on existing sidewalks. The program included hot top 
overlaying for Longmeadow Road, Stonybrook Road, Woodfall Road, 
Spring Valley Road and Evergreen Way - totaling 14,384 feet. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Drainage: The Highway Department removed and reconstructed five catch basins 
at Evergreen Way, Pine Grove Road, Laurel Drive, Hearthstone Drive and 
Country Way. 

Crackfill: The Highway Department has had success with crack filling roads that 
are starting to show wear: The Paddock Lane, Longmeadow Road, Stonybrook 
Road, Woodfall Road, Spring Valley Road and Evergreen Way. 

Chip Seal: The Highway Department chip sealed the following roads: Surry Run, 
The Paddock Lane, Longmeadow Road, Stonybrook Road, Woodfall Road, 
Spring Valley Road and Evergreen Way. 

Pavement Overlay: The Highway Department worked on Granite Street, from 
High Street to Forest Street, Adams Street, Dale Street to West, Dale Street and 
Brook Street. 

Storms: 

The Highway Department assets were challenged with Tropical Storm Sandy. 

This storm caused town wide power outages. 

Snow: 



Total snowfall for the year was 33 inches. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Medfield Highway Department trucked 3,874 tons of rubbish to the Millbury 
incinerator, an increase of 26.3% from last year. Fluorescent bulbs continue to 



18 



be collected at the Transfer Station. There is a shed in the recycling area for this 
purpose. 

Electronix Redux Corp. of Norfolk, MA offers television and electronic 
recycling to current Medfield Transfer Station Sticker holders. They are at 
the Transfer Station, from 9am to 1pm, on the first Saturday of each 
month. Electronix Redux has collected thirty five tons of electronics from 
January 2012 through December 2012, totaling 1,143 units. 

The Mercury Collection Program is ongoing at the Public Works Department at 
Town Hall. Residents are encouraged to drop off items containing mercury, e.g. 
thermometers and thermostats. 

Single Stream Recycling: 870.00 tons 

Batteries 1.15 tons 

Light Steel 37.00 tons 

Brush and Leaves 3.92 tons 

Clothing 105.54 tons 

Books 10.00 tons 

The residential vehicle sticker program has continued at the Transfer Station. 
The program was instituted to ensure that only Medfield residents were allowed 
to utilize the Transfer Station. Transfer Station stickers are available at the Town 
Hall. 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

The Cemetery Department continued its weekly maintenance of the grounds 
including mowing of grass, pruning of trees and bushes; slice seeding, as well as 
the spring and fall cleanup of leaves. 

Extensive pruning continues in both the old and the new section of the cemetery 
with the planting often Juniper bushes on the Route 109 hill area. In addition, a 
Willow tree was planted on the island in the middle of the Cemetery pond. 

Additional cleaning and restoration of monuments was conducted by the Vine 
Lake Preservation Trust, numerous volunteers and professionals in that field. 

In 2012, there were fifty five internments including nineteen cremation burials. 
Twenty-eight burial lots were sold. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Medfield Water Department installed eighteen new water services, 



19 



replaced seven hydrants, repaired ten water service leaks, repaired three 
water main breaks and repaired five gate boxes during 2012. 

The meter replacement program and conversion to a radio-read meter 
system is an ongoing project. In 2012, 192 new meters were installed. 
The radio read system increases the efficiency of the water billing process. 

The Town of Medfield pumped 485.1 million gallons of water in 2012. 

Flushing Program : The Water Department continues to flush the water 
system twice a year in an effort to ensure quality water. 

The Medfield Water Department welcomed Water Technician Christopher 
Nelson to the staff on April 16 th . 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2012, the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) treated 308,311,190 
gallons of sewerage from homes and various businesses in town. The 
flow was treated and discharged to the Charles River, with better than 
98% removal of impurities. This year, 258 dry tons of sludge were hauled 
to Woonsocket, Rhode Island for incineration. A total of 55,200 gallons 
of waste from resident septic systems was treated at the WWTP. In 2012, 
thirty-seven properties were connected to the sewer system. 

A few WWTP equipment upgrades, such as a new raw sewerage pump 
and a plant recirculation pump system commenced in 2012. Painting of 
the interior of the WWTP including the offices, laboratory, bathroom and 
power rooms was completed. The grit aeration system was replaced as 
was the primary clarifier rake system. 

The Medfield Sewer Department welcomed Chief Operator Robert 
McDonald to the staff on October 15 th . 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Assistant 
Maureen Anderson of the Water and Sewer Department and Donna Cimeno of 
the Department of Public Works. 

Appreciation is given to Robert Kennedy, Highway Department Foreman, 
Edward Hinkley, Water and Sewer Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of 



20 



the Wastewater Treatment Plant. Peter retired after thirty six years of service and 
we wish him all the best. We thank all the employees of the Public Works 
Department who are to be commended for their conscientious public service. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Superintendent of Public Works 



21 



Board of Water and Sewerage 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Water and Sewerage thanks Peter Iafolla for his many years 
of service to the Town as the Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant and wishes him the best during his retirement. The Board also 
welcomes Robert McDonald as the new Chief Operator. In the short time 
that Bob has been with the Town, he has accomplished much to improve 
the operation and maintenance of the Town's Wastewater Treatment Plant. 
The Board also welcomes two new associate members, Christian 
Carpenter and William Harvey. Christian and Bill bring many years of 
engineering and financial experience to support the responsibilities of the 
Board. 

As requested by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection (MassDEP), the Board of Water and Sewerage instituted a 
voluntary odd/even irrigation watering ban from May through October. 
Despite this ban, the Town has ample water pumping capacity with water 
supply wells 1, 2, 3, and 6 available. The Water Department pumped 
485.1 million gallons of water during 2012 to supply the needs of the 
Town. 

The Water Department continued the water meter replacement program. 
This program seeks to replace all outdated manual read residential meters 
with new computer read models. The replacement meters provide more 
accurate and automatic remote meter reading. The new meters enable the 
Water Department to gather readings faster and at less cost than through 
the manual reading process. Of the 3,500 residential water meters within 
Town, nearly 450 old meters remain to be replaced. The Board 
encourages those residents with old meters to contact the Water 
Department to schedule an appointment for meter replacement. 

The Board worked with the Water and Sewer Department to implement 
several system improvements over this past year. This work included the 
replacement of approximately 3,000 feet of aging 16" diameter water main 
on North Street, infiltration and inflow investigations and repairs to the 
wastewater collection system, and a number of upgrades to the wastewater 
treatment plant. During 2013, additional water main replacement is 
scheduled to occur on Green Street. 

22 



The Board worked with the Water Department to address and respond to 
noncompliance with drinking water standards for total coliform bacteria. 
Coliforms naturally occur in the environment and are used as water quality 
indicators. Their presence indicates that the water distribution system may 
not be operating optimally. Subsequent testing has confirmed that other, 
more harmful, bacteria were not present within the drinking water supply. 
To address the noncompliance, the Water Department cleaned and 
disinfected the Medfield State Hospital Water Storage Tank and continued 
disinfection of the water supply. Additionally, the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) has required that the 
Medfield State Hospital Tank be temporarily disconnected from the 
Town's distribution system. Though the tank has been removed from 
regular service, the Town is maintaining clean water in the tank to provide 
required storage for fire protection. In the event of an emergency, the 
Water Department can immediately put the Tank back in service. As 
required by MassDEP, disinfection of the water supply will continue 
indefinitely 

In December 2011, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued an 
updated permit to discharge treated water from the wastewater treatment 
plant. This new five year permit has more stringent water quality 
standards for discharge. The permit provides a three year schedule of 
compliance to implement the increased nutrient removal requirements. 
The Sewer Department is instituting process improvements and refining 
operating procedures to meet the new requirements. The Board is hopeful 
that these process improvements will be successful, thereby mitigating the 
need for significant capital projects at the wastewater treatment plant. The 
Board also updated the Wastewater Treatment Plant Staffing Plan with the 
goal of effective and efficient operation of the Plant. 

The Board continued work to update the Water and Sewer Master Plan 
documents. These infrastructure master plans provide an assessment of the 
system's condition and performance, identify system deficiencies, outline 
required maintenance activities, and provide an evaluation of potential 
system improvements. These valuable planning tools help the Board and 
Departments plan and implement a proactive program to maintain well- 
functioning and efficient infrastructure. The Master Plans will assist with 
the Board's goal of maintaining low and competitive rates by forecasting 
operating and capital needs. Further, the updated documents will help the 
Town seek limited and highly competitive State funding assistance. 



23 



The master planning process has identified several large capital projects 
for the maintenance and improvement of the Town's water and wastewater 
infrastructure. These proposed projects include additional water storage to 
replace the deficient Medfield State Hospital Water Storage Tank, 
iron/manganese treatment of water supply wells 3 and 4, rehabilitation of 
aging and leaking wastewater collection piping, and the replacement of 
old cast iron water distribution mains. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Jeremy Marsette, Chairman 

Gary Lehman 

Willis Peligian 

Christian Carpenter, Associate Member 

William Harvey, Associate Member 



24 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



In 2012, the Planning Board reviewed and/or approved: 

• Site Plan Approval for a two-unit condominium dwelling at 77 
South Street 

• Comments relating to the Pare at Medfield Comprehensive 
Permit application submitted to the ZBA for 92 rental 
apartments off West Street 

• An updated fee schedule 

• A preliminary subdivision for Trailside Hill 

• Several informal discussions regarding uses at West Mill Street 
across from the end of Adams Street, the corner of Miller and 
Main Streets, and the change of use at 504 Main Street. 

• Five (5) Approval Not Required (ANR) under Subdivision 
Control Law plans creating new buildable lots, unbuildable lots, 
and redefining lot lines. 

• There were no Scenic Road-Shade Tree hearings held in 2012. 
The Planning Board holds such hearings in conjunction with the 
Tree Warden. 



TOWN MEETING ACTION 

In Town Meeting action, the Board voted to recommend passage of two 
changes to the Zoning Bylaw . The purpose of the change to Section 5 
was to bring the Table of Use into compliance with updated terminology 
and State regulations. It was also intended to streamline permitting in the 
business and industrial districts. The change to Section 10 was 
necessary to satisfy the requirements of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), that towns adopt the newly revised 
Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) 
effective July 17, 2012. Approval was necessary as a condition of the 
Town's continued eligibility in the National Flood Insurance Program. 



25 



There was no change from the previous map dated July, 1979. Town 
Meeting approved the revised Bylaw . 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

Under Section 13 of the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw the Sign 
Advisory Board reviews sign applications for their compliance with the 
Bylaw . The Advisory Board also assists applicants in understanding 
the Sign Bylaw and works with them to obtain results in keeping with 
the character of the Town. In addition Sign Advisory Board members 
make recommendations to the Planning Board for changes in the 
Bylaw . The Board is comprised of both local business people and 
residents. In 2012 the Sign Advisory Board acted on 12 sign 
applications. 

The Planning Board would like to thank the Sign Advisory Board for 
all its diligent work. 



OTHER BUSINESS 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and 
assistance of the Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to: 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney; Tree Warden 
Edward Hinkley; Town Counsel Mark G. Cerel; and Building 
Commissioner/Zoning Enforcement Officer John Naff. 

Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 
8:00 P.M. at the Town House. These meetings are open to the public. 
Appointments with the Board must be made by noon Thursday prior to 
the meeting. Requests for information or appointments should be 
directed to the Town Planner, Sarah Raposa, at the Town House, (508) 
359-8505, ext. 3027 or the direct line: (508) 906-3027. 

The Planning Board wishes to acknowledge and dedicate this year's 
Planning Board annual report to our Planning Board Administrator, 
Norma Cronin, who retired in December after 25+ years of service to 
the Town. Norma's unwavering professionalism, together with her 
comprehensive knowledge of the town's zoning regulations, not only 



26 



supported the Board with its ongoing operations, but was also extended 
to residents and community members seeking assistance throughout her 
tenure in the position. We will miss her and wish her well in her 
retirement. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Elissa G. Franco, Chairman 
George N. Lester, Vice-Chairman 
Stephen J. Browne, Clerk 
Wright C. Dickinson, Member 
Keith R. Diggans, Member 



27 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2012 the Board of Appeals acted on twenty-six applications as 
follows: 



GRANTED: 



One Special Permit to allow family apartments 

One Special Permit for parking in the Downtown 

Business District 

One Special Permit to allow a swimming pool within 

the rear setback 

One Special Permit to allow work in the Flood Plain 

District, Aquifer Protection District, and Watershed 

Protection District 

Three Findings that the demolition of an existing 

house and the construction of a new one will not 

intensify the existing nonconformity or, in the 

alternative, will not be detrimental to the 

neighborhood 

Five Special Permits for recreational uses 

One modification of a pervious decision for the 

square footage of a house 

Two Special Permits for home occupations 

One Special Permit for a Wireless Communication 

Facility 

One Special Permit for a sign 

One Special Permit for a restaurant 

One Comprehensive Permit for 92 rental apartments 

off West Street 

One Finding to allow three condos in the RT Zoning 

District 

Six Findings that additions to houses would not be 

detrimental to the neighborhood 



28 



No applications were denied 

In December, Chairman Sylvia resigned from the Board after forty 
years of dedicated service. The Board is grateful for his vast 
knowledge and leadership over the years. 

Also in December, the Board's long-serving, some would say long- 
suffering, administrative assistant, Norma Cronin, retired after many 
years of service to the Town. The Board expresses its heartfelt 
gratitude to her for her years of service and wishes her the best as she 
embarks on her golden years. 

The Board would also like to express its sincere thanks for all the 
support and consideration it has received this past year from the Town 
Boards and the residents of the Town of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen M. Nolan, Chairman 
Russell J. Hallisey, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Douglas C. Boyer, Associate 



29 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Massachusetts Department of Revenue in December, 2012 approved 
the values set out in the Assessors' triennial recertification report, 
resulting in a municipal tax rate of $15.73/$1,000 for fiscal year 2013, 
matching last year's rate. The town tax levy commitment, which is 
primarily the result of monies appropriated at Town Meeting, was 
$35,459,410, amounting to a minimal $288,106, or .8%, increase over last 
year's commitment of $35,171,304. Tax bills were timely mailed in 
December, 2012 for third quarter tax payments. The real estate market 
improved slightly, as average assessed values of single-family homes in 
Medfield increased modestly between January, 2011 and January, 2012. 
Overall total valuations for the town in fiscal year 2013 increased to 
$2,254,253,649 from $2,236,128,671 in fiscal year 2012. 

Taxpayers may access online via the town of Medfield website 
(town.medfield.net)(Land & Property) fiscal year 2013 town wide 
property values, the Geographic Information System (GIS), other 
descriptive property information, and forms; the Board continues to update 
the Assessors' webpage from time to time. 

The Board this year continued to encourage the Board of Selectmen to 
promote the senior tax workoff program, an arrangement which mutually 
benefits Medfield' s senior citizens and its town government; also in the 
town's interest, the Board continues to recommend each year Town 
Meeting's adoption of legislation affording tax relief to qualifying senior 
citizens, and veterans. 

In March, 2012, Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. was elected to another three-year 
term on the Board of Assessors. 

The Board wishes to thank Deputy Assessor Stan Bergeron for all of his 
hard work in completing the triennial town wide revaluation, which was a 
prerequisite to Department of Revenue approval of the fiscal year 2013 tax 
rate. The Board also thanks Stan and his staff Donna O'Neill and Kathy 
Mills for pulling together the facts, figures, and documentation enabling 
the Assessing Department to fulfill its role as part of Medfield's financial 



30 



team. They together truly make it a pleasure to be a member of the Board 
of Assessors of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr., Chairman 

R. Edward Beard, Clerk 

Francis J. Perry, III, Third Member 



31 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Personnel Board is comprised of three members appointed by the 
Town Moderator, the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Chairman of the Warrant Committee. The term of office is for three years. 
The Board is responsible for maintaining and administering the Personnel 
Plan which establishes policies and procedures for employees of the 
Town, maintaining job descriptions, periodic review of the classification 
and pay schedule, and provides guidance on all hiring, transfers, 
promotions, terminations, and retirements. Kristine Trierweiler, Assistant 
Town Administrator provides staffing support to the Board. 

The Personnel Board met periodically throughout the year. Rachel Brown 
was again appointed by the Committee to represent the Personnel Board at 
the Collective Bargaining sessions for the Fire Department Union. The 
Collective Bargaining Committee continues to meet with the Fire 
Department to settle the terms of a new contract. 

Ms. Brown continues to represent the Personnel Board on the Board of 
Selectmen's Insurance Advisory Committee. The Committee's role is to 
review the health care options provided by the Town to ensure that we 
provide quality health care for employees and retirees at a reasonable cost. 
The Insurance Advisory Committee continues to work with the 
Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Agency (Mil A) and Blue Cross Blue 
Shield to monitor claims and health care expenses. The Committee has 
kept abreast of Massachusetts Municipal Health Care Reform and is 
confident that our existing relationship with MIIA not only gives us 
greater flexibility in tailoring our plans to meet employees' and retirees' 
needs, but also protects us from what we consider is a State Insurance pool 
that has accepted municipalities with poor health experience. 

The Personnel Board works with the Warrant Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen each year to recommend a cost of living increase to town 
employees. This cost of living increase is based on industry standards, 
salary compensation surveys, as well as the town's budget situation. This 
year the Board, in consultation with the Warrant Committee, proposed a 
2% cost of living increase for non-union employees for FY 2013. 

32 



The Personnel Board is required by the Personnel Bylaw to conduct a 
reclassification of all non union positions. The Personnel Board asked for 
and received funding for the study through the Capital Budget. After 
reviewing proposals and talking with compensation consultants the Board 
determined that we needed additional monies to complete the study. The 
Personnel Board has requested additional funding from the capital budget 
and intends to complete the comprehensive reclassification plan for non 
union employees in FY 14. 

The Board would like to acknowledge several retirements from the Town. 
Ms. Norma Cronin was the Administrative Assistant for the Planning 
Board and Zoning Board of Appeals for over 25 years. She will be missed 
for all of her work at the Town House. Ms. Patti Iafolla Walsh retired in 
March from the Building and Inspections Department. In October, Mr. 
Peter Iafolla retired from the Wastewater Treatment Plant after serving the 
town for thirty six years. We extend good wishes to all of them in their 
retirement. 

The Personnel Board undertook the hiring of two new department head 
positions. The Town is experiencing growth in several areas including the 
Medfield State Hospital redevelopment, a 40B development project off of 
West Street, as well as an increase in economic development in the 
downtown area and in the Town as a whole. The Personnel Board 
determined it was necessary to hire a full time certified Building 
Commissioner and a full time Town Planner. These positions will allow 
the Town to face these development issues proactively. The Board is 
pleased to report that Mr. John Naff has been hired as our first full time 
Building Commissioner and Ms. Sarah Raposa was hired as our first Town 
Planner. 

We would like to thank the employees for their dedication and service to 
the Town of Medfield and acknowledge that with ever decreasing budgets, 
we continue to look to them to maintain service and look for operational 
efficiencies. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Debra Shuman, Chairman 
Christine Connolly 
Rachel Brown 



33 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my annual report as Chief of the Medfield Police 
Department for the year ending December 3 1, 2012. 

Identity theft has continued to be a problem throughout the United States 
and Medfield is no exception. Various types of thefts and frauds are 
committed and reported to the Medfield Police Department on a regular 
basis. Community members need to be vigilant and check their credit card 
and bank statements often. The computer, which can be a source of 
information for those trying to use your identity, can also be one of your 
best defenses by using it to check on activity in your accounts. Telephone 
scams are another simple way for criminals to commit larcenies. Several 
residents received calls this year, stating that family members were in a 
difficult situation and needed funds sent immediately to assist them. This 
is another form of telephone fraud. One of your best defenses is your own 
intuition. If it does not sound right, it probably is not. 

Progress was made on plans for a new or renovated Public Safety Facility. 
HKT, an architectural firm from Somerville, Massachusetts, was hired to 
conduct a needs assessment of the facility. The unique aspect of this type 
of assessment is that any proposed construction will be based on how the 
Medfield Fire and Police Departments conduct their business. The 
resulting design will reflect the actual needs of the agencies. Input from 
the neighborhood and the community will be sought during the process 
and updates will be issued to keep people informed of developments. 

Weather factored again in 2012 as Sandy passed through Medfield in late 
October. The wind caused issues in several areas of town. Trees and limbs 
damaged property as well as blocking roads and causing extensive power 
outages. As in previous years, the various Town Departments worked 
together to resolve issues as efficiently as possible. This was also the first 
storm, causing power outages, that the Police and Fire Department 
communication systems at the two water towers were supported by 
permanent emergency generators that were funded at Town Meeting. 
Many thanks go to Fire Chief Kingsbury for seeing this project through 
and having the generators ready for use. 

34 



In a fitting tribute to Medfield Police Detective Bob Naughton; the Robert 
E. Naughton Civic Square was dedicated on Saturday, September 29 th , at 
the intersection of Causeway Street and Claypit Road. Successful Eagle 
Scout candidate Peter Whelan worked with the Committee to Study 
Memorials to design and construct the memorial that included a backdrop 
of pine trees that Bob had planted years ago. Personally, Bob was an 
inspiration and mentor to me when I first worked in Medfield. He taught 
me to be thorough in my investigations but perhaps more importantly, fair 
and respectful in my treatment of people. The Robert E. Naughton Civic 
Square will insure that this fine gentleman will be remembered for 
generations to come as a brave and resourceful police officer who went far 
beyond what was required and was always ready to lend a hand to anyone 
in need. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Medfield 
Police Department for their diligent attention to the variety of duties that 
they are required to perform on a daily basis. Also, my thanks to the 
various Town Departments for the outstanding assistance and cooperation 
received over the past year. 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Robert E. Meaney 



35 



This is a summary of the 2012 calls that the Police Department 
handled: 



Aggravated Assault 12 

Arrests 131 

Arson 

Assists 677 

Breaking and Entering 1 5 

Counterfeiting/Forgery 12 

Fraud 221 

Disorderly Conduct 9 

Disturbances 82 

Drug Violations 22 

Embezzlement 1 

Extortion 

Homicides 

Impersonation 8 

Intimidation 13 

Juvenile Offenses 5 

Larceny 49 

Liquor Law violations 20 

Medical Assists 15 

Miscellaneous Complaints 348 

Mischief 35 

Missing persons 14 

Motor Vehicle crashes 247 

Motor Vehicle citations 688 

Operating Under Influence 16 

Parking Tickets 38 

Protective Custody 1 

Restraining Orders 26 

Robbery 

Runaway 

Shoplifting 

Simple Assault 14 

Suicide 

Threats 9 

Trespass 4 

Vandalism 40 

Weapons Violation 4 



36 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Medfield Emergency 
Management Agency for the year ending December 3 1, 2012. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination 
between the Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency is divided into two 
sections. One section, the Management Group contains amateur radio 
operators, a transport section and shelter management people. The second 
section contains the auxiliary police officers. Both groups are under the 
control of the Emergency Management Agency Director who reports to 
the Chief of Police on auxiliary police matters and the Town 
Administrator on emergency management issues. 

The management group maintains backup communications systems, 
provides transportation to and runs shelter operations in case of 
emergencies where people need temporary shelter due to power outages or 
other such storm damage. The auxiliary police unit provides additional 
manpower to the police department during emergencies and large events 
such as parades and other public gatherings. As in past years both groups 
combined to donate over 1,000 man-hours of community service to the 
Town. 

I would like to thank the personnel of the department for their continued 
support and contributions throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the 
Board of Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police 
Department for their assistance and support. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ray M. Burton Jr. 
Director 



37 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE -RESCUE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the 
year ending December 3 1, 2012. 

Fire Department personnel responded to 1,135 calls for service in 2012, of 
those, 608 were for Emergency Medical Services. 

Request for services throughout the year is always varied; it's what makes 
our profession interesting. The department assisted the Police Department 
with conducting a search for a missing person. There were two major 
structure fires that personnel responded to as well as providing mutual aid 
assistance to our neighboring communities with two others. For the second 
year in a row, the weather was a factor. In October we were faced with 
Hurricane Sandy bearing down on us. Department members responded to 
over thirty-five calls for wires and trees down. Thankfully there were no 
reports of any storm related injuries. 

There are changes that will be taking place in our downtown area. With 
the closing of the Mobil Station, Coldwell Banker Realty, Medfield 
Seafood and Friendly's, I will be working with the Building 
Commissioner and property owners to make sure that whatever is to be 
located on those sites will be done properly. 

In August we placed into service a new truck, Squad 4. This truck 
replaced a Brush Truck that had been in service for over thirty-five years. 
The new 4x4 Squad has many more capabilities than the old one and will 
serve the department well for many years to come. The capital budget 
committee approved funds this year to equip the Police/Fire 
communication sites with emergency backup generators. With the help of 
the DPW doing the site work, this project has been completed and we will 
no longer have to transport portable generators to these sites in the event 
of power failures. 

In FY11, funding was approved to do a needs assessment and a concept 
design for a new Public Safety Building. HKT Architects have been hired 
and the process is under way. I will be working closely with the 

38 



Permanent Building Committee and Chief Meaney to design a facility that 
will serve the Town for a long time to come. We have been working out of 
our current building for over fifty years and are bursting at the seams. 
Hopefully there will be some relief in the not too distant future. 

Department staffing remains the same. I am hopeful that in the Spring I 
will be able to recruit some new on-call members to replace some recent 
retirements. 

Residents are reminded that NFPA recommends replacing your smoke 
detectors after ten years of service. Carbon Monoxide detectors have a life 
expectancy of five to seven years. For the safety of you and your family, 
please check your devices to be sure they are current and will operate 
properly if the need arises. Fire Inspections, evacuation drills and plan 
reviews have been conducted throughout the year. 

I wish to thank all the members of the department for their continued 
commitment and service to the residents of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



39 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2012 

AMBULANCE 

Total Calls 608 



Transports Metrowest Natick 


69 


Caritas Norwood 


259 


Metro West Framingham 




Newton 


16 




11 


Wellesley 




Deaconess Glover 


69 


Beth Israel 


4 


Brigham & Women's 


j 


Mass General 





Other 


6 






Advanced Life Support 








Departmental ALS: 


130 






ALS Intercepts: 


198 






Walpole 


11 






Westwood 


45 






Events ALS 


142 






Other Services 








Medflight 


2 






Details 


1 






Cancelled Refusals 


94 






Well Being Checks 


26 






Mutual Aid: 








Rendered 


47 






Received 


77 






FIRE DEPARTMENT 








Total Calls 


527 






Box 


150 






Still 


377 






Residential 


59 






Accidental System Malfunction 


63 







40 



^cr\ices 








Ambulance Assist 


25 


Hazardous Conditions 


111 


Appliances 


24 


Investigations 


: 1 


Brush and Gr_ 


15 


Motor Vehicle 


4 


Burners Oil 


3 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


92 


Gas 





jtual Aid Rendered 


:: 


Carbon Monoxide Alarms 


58 


Received 


5 


Details 





Police Assist 


13 


Dumpsters 


1 


Station Coverage 


:- 


Electrical 


10 


Struct u . 


13 


Fuel Spills 


f 


Storm Related 


55 


Gas Leaks Investigations 


: 


Searches 


3 


Med-Flight 


4 






Fireworks 









Public Assistance 




Permits Issued 




Lock Outs 


: 


Blasting 


: 


Pumping Cellars 


5 


Bonfire 





Water Problems 


11 


Burning 


47 


Other 


108 


Fuel Storu r . 


15 






Sprinkler Inst 


12 


Inspections 




Propane Stor^_. 


23 


Blasting 


_ _ 


U Tank Removal 


: 


Fire Prevention 




Fire Alarm Ins 


9 


Fuel Storage 


13 


Tank Truck 


12 


New Residential 


29 






Smoke Detectors New 


29 






Resale 


165 






Oil Burners 


:" 






Wood Stoves 


4 






U Tank Removal 


: 






AST Removal 


13 







41 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector 
from January 1 through December 31. 20012. 

Total Animal Control Calls 1 ,240 

Total Animal Related Incidents 893 



Calls for dogs running loose 159 

Barking dog complaints 14 

Pooper scooper complaints 4 

Number of citations issued 85 

Calls for animals to be removed from a resident's home 

(includes squirrels, chipmunks, birds, opossums, and snakes) 35 

Bats removed from residents homes 26 

Animals hit by cars: 

Dogs 8 

Cats 15 

Raccoons 23 

Opossums 1 9 

Skunks 8 

Deer 28 

Other (coyote, woodchuck, turkey, rabbit, turtle etc.) 34 

Injured or sick wildlife that had to be euthanized by the ACO 

Raccoons 21 

Skunks 9 

Deer 6 

Fisher 2 

Other 11 

Calls related to squirrels, chipmunks and birds 32 

Calls related to turtles 7 

Calls related to raccoons, skunks, and opossums 9 

Dog bites in 2012 13 

Cat bites in 2012 3 



42 



Dogs abandoned in Medfield 4 

Number of stray cats brought to the shelter 24 

Number of stray rabbits brought to the shelter 2 

Number of surrendered Medfield animals 23 

Once again this year over 300 cats, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, birds and other 
small animals were adopted from the Medfield Animal Shelter! 

The rabies rate stayed steady this year with four of the twelve specimens testing 
positive for rabies. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the 
Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals 
are in the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 2012: 

Horses 109 

Poultry 173 

Goats 10 

Sheep 21 

Donkeys 8 

Ponies 4 

Llamas 1 



I truly appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of 
Medfield, the Medfield Police Department. Farm Street Veterinary Hospital, 
Main Street Veterinary Hospital, Millis, Medfield Veterinary Clinic and the two 
Traveling Veterinarians, Heather Cochran, DVM and Kate Pittman, DVM. I want 
to thank Danielle Landry for her six years of service as Assistant Animal Control 
Officer. She resigned in 2012 to pursue a full-time ACO position for the Town of 
Needham. I also want to thank current Assistant ACO, Lori Sallee, for her 
coverage when I am off work and on some weekends. I want to acknowledge all 
of the Medfield Animal Shelter's dedicated volunteers that care for the animals 
every day and the biggest thank you to the Medfield residents for their ongoing 
donations and support of the Medfield Animal Shelter. Without all of you, we 
would not have been able to save all the cats, dogs, rabbits, birds and other small 
animals that were adopted this year! 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer Shaw 
Animal Control Officer 
Animal Inspector 

43 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 3 1, 2012: 





Permits 


Inspections 


Income ($) 


Expenses ($) 




2011 


2012 


2011 


2012 


2011 


2012 


2011 


2012 


Building 


478 


404 


2192 


2411 


250,886 


262,663 


82,157 


75,273 




















Wiring 


341 


419 


568 


658 


30,637 


40,890 


17,195 


20,220 




















Plumbing/Gas 


379 


500 


174 


336 


17,328 


26,294 


5,226 


10,305 




















Sheet Metal 




40 




40 




5,450 




1,236 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the 
calendar year 2012 was $335,297 as compared to $298,851 in 2011. Direct 
expenses for 2012 were $107,034 as compared to $104,578 in 201 1. 



BUILDING INSPECTION 



A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 

Multi family (Condo's) 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 

Additions to private dwellings 

Renovations to private dwellings 

Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 

New industrial/business buildings 

Family apartments 

Two Family apartments 

Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 

Private swimming pools 

Accessory buildings 

Residential garages 

Demolition 

Tents (temporary) & construction trailers 

Signs 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 

New windows 

Solar System 



18 



13 
128 

27 




72 
9 
6 
2 

12 
6 
6 
9 

48 
8 



44 



Towers/Wireless 

Insulation 29 

Decks 10 

Foundations 1 

Total 404 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 23 new residences in 2012, as 
compared to nine in 201 1 . 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, 
nursing homes and pre-schools amounted to 40 inspections for 2012. 

Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

2011 2012 

New dwellings $4,717,500 $7,590,000 

Renovations and additions, pools, 9,923,712 6,586,284 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 

residential 
New construction - business and 

industry 



Renovations and additions business 


45,000 


2,988,310 


and industry 






Multi-family dwellings 








Two family dwellings 








Family apartments 









Whether you are planning to renovate a kitchen or bath, finish a basement, 
add a pool, a deck, re-shingle, apply siding or install replacement 
windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. These 
comprehensive building code requirements may seem cumbersome, but 
they are meant to benefit us all by monitoring the building and 
development activities in our community. Please also remember that the 
placement of any type of structure, as simple as a tool shed (accessory 
building) on your property must adhere to the rules and regulations of the 
Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a building permit is required. 
Before you proceed with any changes to your home or property, please 
call the Inspection Department at the Town Hall (508-906-3005) and we 
will help you get started in the process of applying for a permit. 

45 



Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 8th Edition) 
continues to be the responsibility of the local building inspectors. 
Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring contractors to be registered with the 
Commonwealth became the responsibility of the Inspection Department 
staff to institute procedural changes for compliance. The office of the 
Inspection Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders 
holding State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure 
compliance with Section 110.R5 of the State Building Code. The 
Building inspectors continue the enforcement of the code by making 
Inspections of schools, churches and rest homes, as well as other places of 
assembly on a periodic basis. 

The Building Commissioner also serves the Town in the capacity of 
Enforcing Officer for Zoning and, as such, made four inspections to 
investigate complaints and inquiries brought to his attention by residents 
as well as other town boards and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections 
was greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to 
inspect smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors in new 
construction and in additions and renovations, as well as inspecting the 
installation of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of 
the importance of having their wood/pellet stove installations inspected 
and certified in accordance with the requirements of the Massachusetts 
State Building Code. 

We want to thank Patti Iafolla Walsh for her years of service to the Town 
and this department. We wish her all the best in her retirement. Thank you 
to Scott Allison, Administrative Assistant. Also, a special thanks again 
this year to Margaret Warren for her continued help in this office. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to 
administer, investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and 
State Fuel Gas Code. Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas 
permits. Permits can only be issued to a licensed Journeyman or a Master 
Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, altered, removed, replaced, 
or repaired until the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas has issued a permit. 
The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a 



46 



citizen of the town requires the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, 
he is getting the assurance that the installation will be completed correctly 
and safely by a trained professional. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to 
give the consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe 
installation. Of great concern lately is the installation of backflow 
prevention devices, where necessary, to insure the continuance of the good 
clean potable water of which we are very proud in Medfield. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric 
Code as well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring 
installations for which permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the 
permitting process is in effect to assure safe and correct installations. 

Thank you to Peter Diamond, Assistant Electrical Inspector. 



Respectfully submitted, 

John G. Naff, Building Commissioner 

James J. Leonard, Inspector of Wires 

John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing & Gas Inspector 



47 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The following is the Annual Report for the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the calendar year ending December 31, 2012. 

Measuring devices tested and sealed as required by Massachusetts law: 

Weighing scales 34 

Liquid measuring meters (In motor fuel pumps) 75 

Linear measures (Yardsticks and tape measures) 2 

Bottle refund machines 3 

Scanning system tests 3 

Other inspections and tests (packaged grocery items, etc. for 92 

weight and marking. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael J. Clancy 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



48 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission is pleased to submit its annual report for 2012. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Act, M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the Department of 
Environmental Protection's Stormwater Management Policy and the Medfield 
Wetlands Bylaw, Article IX. These laws protect the wetlands and waterways of 
Medfield. The functions of these laws are: 

• to safeguard public surface and groundwater supplies 

• to prevent damage from flooding by preserving town resource areas. 

The resource areas are floodplains, swamps and bogs, streams, ponds and other 
water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. Under the Medfield 
Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools and vernal pool habitat (100-foot area surrounding 
the vernal pool) and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected resource areas. 
Anyone proposing to alter a resource area or land subject to flooding, or to 
perform work within 100 feet of a wetlands or bank, or within 200 feet of a river 
or perennial stream must file for a permit with the Conservation Commission. 
Anyone wishing to work within these protected areas must satisfy the 
Commission that the proposed work will not significantly harm the resources. 

The Town benefits from the wetlands protection laws and their associated 
regulations by protecting Medfield's wetlands from pollution, nutrient 
overloading and encroachment. The wetlands laws provide guidance and 
consistency to applicants with regards to the rules and regulations for various 
construction projects. The Commission's preeminent concern is to ensure that 
the eight interests of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. The eight important public interests or 
values are: 

• protection of public and private water supply, 

• protection of groundwater supply, 

• flood control, 

• storm damage prevention, 

• prevention of pollution, 

• protection of land containing shellfish, 

• protection of fisheries and 

• protection of wildlife habitat 



49 



as they relate to the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield 
Wetlands Bylaw. 

In 2012, the Commission held 19 public meetings for the purpose of: 12 Requests 
for Determinations of Applicability, 13 Notices of Intent and 3 violations. 
During 2012, 23 project approval permits were issued along with approvals for 
two Orders of Resource Area Delineation. Three fines were issued for the total 
sum of $685.00. All the fines were paid into the Town's general fund through 
the Town Clerk's Office. The Commission transferred $14,232.06 from its fee 
account to the general fund to offset the Conservation Agent's salary. 

The Commission continued to monitor the ongoing scope of work proposed at 
the former hospital site through the Public Involvement Process (PIP). 
Commissioner Deborah Bero continues to represent the Commission on the State 
Hospital Environmental Review Committee (SHERC) and continues to keep the 
Commission informed of SHERC concerns. The Commission approved a 
modification to an existing Order of Conditions (permit) allowing additional test 
borings to be conducted at the State Hospital Construction and Demolition Area 
(C & D Area). These were necessary for additional planning regarding cleanup 
of the site. The Order for cleanup of the site was appealed in 201 1 and continues 
to be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for 
a Superceding Order of Conditions. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the 
Commission is charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect 
the watershed resources of the town and to promote and develop natural 
resources of the town. The Commission actively pursues the acquisition of land 
for conservation and passive recreation use. During 2012, the Commission 
received one Conservation Restriction (CR) for land on Erik Road and reviewed 
a CR under The Trustees of the Reservations (TTOR) for land on Main Street. 

The Commission continues to study the agricultural use of certain areas of 
conservation land for farming and other agricultural use. The Holmquist Farm 
Conservation Land on Plain Street is the home for the Medfield Community 
Gardens and the 4-H Club Sheep Project. 

The Conservation Commission Act also requires that the Conservation 
Commission provide maintenance to its Conservation Lands. Storm damage as a 
result of tree falls to a footbridge at the Minuteman Road Trail resulted in a 
$3,034.50 expenditure for repair of the footbridge and tree removal. The 
Conservation Commission received sufficient funding to provide an abbreviated 
pond management program for Meetinghouse Pond, Cemetery Pond, Kingsbury 
Pond, Danielson Pond, and Flynn's Pond. Commissioner Robert Kennedy 
continues to represent the Commission on the Clean Pond Study Committee. 



50 



The Commission oversees many youth oriented projects. The Commission 
reviewed and guided one Eagle Scout project during 2012. Montrose School 
senior high school women perform on-going community service by maintaining 
the formal garden entrance at Danielson Pond and vegetation maintenance at the 
Kingsbury Pond / Grist Mill entrance. 

The Commission through appointments made by the Board of Selectmen 
established an Open Space and Recreation Planning Committee (OSRPC). The 
purpose of the OSRPC is to review and revise the town's Open Space and 
Recreation Plan so as to meet and express the current thinking of the people of 
Medfield. The committee assesses the open space and recreational needs of the 
town in light of current growth and trends. The members of the OSRPC are 
Chairman Robert Aigler, Conservation Commissioner, Robert Tatro, Park and 
Recreation Commissioner, Thomas Caragliano, member-at-large, David 
Lafreniere, Friends of Medfield's Forest and Trails member and Michael Perloff, 
Conservation Commissioner. The Committee meets on a monthly basis. In order 
to assess the ideas and concerns of the citizens, the OSRPC selected Survey 
Monkey as its electronic survey tool in order to create a survey for Medfield's 
citizens. The OSRPC continue to review the results of the survey. 

In 2012 the Conservation Commission heard reports from the Medfield Lyme 
Disease Committee and the Medfield Rail Trail Committee. These were progress 
reports regarding the limited archery hunting for deer on selected Conservation 
parcels and the steps each rail trail town needs to take in order to develop the rail 
trail 

The Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of each month. The 
Conservation Commission is a seven-member commission. Commissioners are 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Anyone interested in serving on the 
Commission as a member or an associate should send a letter of interest and 
resume to the Board of Selectmen and a copy to the Conservation Commission. 

The Conservation Office is located on the second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 
and is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. For an appointment 
regarding conservation and /or wetlands matters, call the Conservation office, 
508 906-3028. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 
Michael Perloff, Vice-Chairman 
Robert Aigler 
Deborah J. Bero 
Philip J. Bun- 
Robert E. Kennedy 
Mary McCarthy 

51 



MEDFIELD ENERGY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 2012, Medfield Energy Committee (MEC) continued to help the Town 
to further reduce energy use in its municipal buildings as well as in finding 
ways to educate homeowners on building energy efficiency. 

The School Department completed two energy efficiency projects with 
help from NSTAR and Columbia Gas of Massachusetts. Parking lot, 
walkway, exterior wall and some canopy lights at the Medfield High, 
Middle and Memorial Schools were replaced with more energy efficient 
lighting. The payback will be less than two years and the lamps will be 
good for 10 to 20 years. The majority of the lights was induction lighting 
and LED lighting was used for the canopy entrance. Wheelock School 
had several energy efficient measures installed in 2012 including a retrofit ; 
of its water boiler plant with direct digital controls (DDC), and an energy 
management system (EMS) was installed to control air handlers, unit 
ventilators in the cafeteria, and baseboard and cabinets heaters in hallways 
and bathrooms. With utility incentives, the payback will be three years. 

In 2012, the Medfield Town Library implemented many of the 
recommendations from its energy audit using capital funds that were 
awarded at the last town meeting and reported in last year's MEC annual 
report. In October 2012, an energy audit was performed on the town's 
wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The energy audit was a result of the 
town's application to MA Department of Energy Resources (DOER) for 
assistance with energy conservation strategies at the WWTP. Of the 23 
WWTP plants in the state that were audited, DOER concluded that 
Medfield's plant was the most energy efficient! As a result of the energy 
audit, incentives were found to help pay for replacing RTU's (remote 
terminal units that transmit data electronically) at the plant. 

In April 2012, MEC met with Jack Hurd, Housing Authority Director, to 
discuss potential energy efficiency improvements for the Tilden Village 
complex. We also discussed state programs, utility programs and 
incentives that are available. 



52 



On the residential home front, the Medfield thermal imaging program 
conducted at no cost by Sagewell, Inc. resulted in 663 requests for infrared 
imaging by homeowners. A total of 900 homes were analyzed and one in 
four homes were found to be solar suitable. As a result of Sagewell 
imaging the entire Town, any resident can still request a report by- 
contacting Sagewell at www.sagewell.com . Audit requests through the 
Sagewell website are handled by MassSave providers like Next Step 
Living or Co-Op Power. 

Also in 2012, MEC collaborated with Medfield Green to educate 
homeowners about energy efficiency programs. Last August MEC had a 
booth at the farmer's market organized by Medfield Green in the center of 
Town. At the end of the year, MEC again collaborated with Medfield 
Green to plan for a 2013 Medfield Energy Series; two well-attended 
sessions have already been held at the Medfield Library and are available 
to view from the Cable 8 website. 

Medfield's 2012 electricity use by building sector is shown below. As one 
would expect, the residential sector by far is the largest user in Medfield at 
70% (4,260 accounts) followed by the commercial sector (446 accounts) 
at 21% and the municipal sector (73 accounts) at 9%. 



Medfield Annual kWh Usage 



<.01% 




<.01% 



Commercial-12,690,560 
lndustrial-213,200 
Municipal-5,623,758 
Residential-42,942,834 
Federal & State-163,268 



Source: Marketing Data Warehouse 12-month snapshot as of 2-26-2013 as provided by 
NSTAR 



53 



MEC was formed in 2008 with a goal to reduce the town's municipal 
energy consumption by 20%. The annual electricity savings from 
municipal energy savings in the last 5 years is 1,101,360 kWh, which is an 
annual dollars savings of approximately $203,901. 

In 2013, the committee is exploring the feasibility of renewables, mainly 
solar, on municipal sites. To that end, the committee invited the Town 
Administrator of Dartmouth to share his knowledge and experiences 
regarding his town's renewable energy activities to its October 2012 
meeting. The Medfield WWTP is being considered a site for a ground- 
mounted solar array. The MEC would also like to assess other town sites 
and town buildings for their solar potential. The MEC wrote a letter to the 
Selectmen requesting the town consider adopting a local solar siting 
bylaw. 

The MEC meets monthly at the Town House. Please check the Town's 
website for notice of our meetings. The public is invited to attend the 
meetings, participate in MEC activities and offer suggestions on how the 
Town can best meet the challenges of reducing energy consumption and 
minimizing its environmental impact. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Marie Nolan, Chair 

Lee Alinksy 

Fred Bunger, MCAN Liason 

Penni Conner 

Fred Davis 

Cynthia Greene 



Charles Kellner, School Dept, ex officio 

Ryan McLaughlin 

David Temple 

Osier Peterson, Selectmen, ex officio 

Emre Schveighoffer 

Michael Sullivan, Town Administrator 



54 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen. Our job is to identify and protect Medfield's historical and 
archaeological assets. We make sure historic preservation is considered in 
community planning and development decisions. The commission has an 
annual budget of $1,500, and has certain statutory authority. Monthly 
meetings in the Town House are open to the public. 

We work proactively to preserve those qualities of the Town that residents 
say they want, which helps preserve property values. We walk the 
narrow, fuzzy line between historic preservation and respecting property 
owners' rights. Owners and developers tend to favor historic preservation 
in principle... so long as it doesn't affect their bottom line when they want 
to demolish an antique to make room for a McMansion, which they 
believe will have greater market appeal. 

Historic Preservation Award to Rob Gregg 

In 1999 the Medfield Historical Commission, using a grant from the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission, hired a professional to prepare a 
town-wide historic preservation plan. It highlighted the then-neglected 
Vine Lake Cemetery as one of our major historical assets. In 2004 and 
2005 David Temple sought and won additional grants for a comprehensive 
preservation and management plan for the cemetery and for a start on 
some hands-on restoration work. 

This was a good beginning, but then what? Fortunately for Medfield, Rob 
Gregg of 52 South Street stepped forward and created the Vine Lake 
Preservation Trust, which, according to its mission statement, "exists to 
attract funding and to establish Vine Lake Cemetery as a vibrant cultural 
resource by delivering programs in education, preservation, restoration, 
and beautification to all ages." 

Since 2009, the trust has recruited and trained volunteers to clean and 
restore grave markers and landscape features, put on tours and other 
educational programs and public art exhibits, and published a beautiful 
monthly on-line newsletter, Quiet Voices. 



55 



Rob Gregg has received much help from an enthusiastic and capable board 
of directors and volunteer team that he recruited, but without his vision 
and leadership, nothing would have happened. Recognizing this, the 
commission honored Rob Gregg with its historic preservation award. 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

Medfield was one of the first Massachusetts communities with a 
demolition delay bylaw, and ours remains one of the more stringent. It 
prevents historically significant buildings - non-renewable resources — 
from being demolished before serious efforts have been made to 
rehabilitate or restore. 

When an application is filed to demolish a building over 50 years old, the 
commission investigates and holds hearings on those that may be 
historically significant. If a building is then declared "preferably 
preserved," its demolition is delayed for up to a year. The commission 
always seeks win-win solutions - such as rehab and adaptive reuse of at 
least part of the building — that serve the interests of both the property 
owner and historic preservation. We define lose-lose as when the owner 
refuses to negotiate and instead simply waits us out for the full year and 
then demolishes the structure. 

The commission reviewed eight demolition applications last year (down 
from ten in 2011) on properties at 60 and 66 Foundry Street, 77 South 
Street, 4 Hillcrest Road, 15 Ledgetree Road, 48-50 Pleasant Street, 70 
Green Street, and 7 Hale Place. As usual, the majority of the houses were 
found to lack historical significance, and the commission authorized their 
demolition right after the hearings. The houses at 66 Foundry Street, 77 
South, and 48-50 Pleasant Street were determined to be historically 
significant and preferably preserved, leading to the imposition of the one- 
year demolition delay. 

The house at 66 Foundry Street was one of the oldest in town and was also 
the site of a garrison used in King Philip's War in 1676. The owner and 
his architect and contractor tried conscientiously but unsuccessfully for six 
months to find an alternative to demolition. The commission eventually 
released it for demolition, but first the owner prepared a book with 
architectural drawings and photographs to record what the house was like. 
That book was presented to the Medfield Historical Society for 
safekeeping. 



56 



The house at 77 South Street dated from about 1820. The developer 
wanted to demolish it and put up a two conjoined house. He agreed to 
preserve and rehab the front half of the house, so the commission allowed 
the more deteriorated remainder to be demolished. 

The house at 48-50 Pleasant Street was built about 1820, and the 
commission put a one-year hold on demolition. The builder has come 
back with some counterproposals, which are still being considered and 
debated as of this writing. 

Certified Local Government 

Thanks to its CLG (Certified Local Government - and we have to reapply 
every year) status, Medfield has received many survey and planning grants 
from the state and federal governments in recent years. The 
Massachusetts Historical Commission continues to encourage us to apply 
because they believe we put the money to good use. 

For our survey and planning work, our demolition delay activism, MAAC, 
and other activities, the Massachusetts Historical Commission has long 
pointed to Medfield as a model for other historical commissions. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MAAC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1993 as a 
subcommittee of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to 
help protect archaeologically-sensitive areas in town. MAAC members 
are John A. Thompson, Chairman; Marc Eames; Debbie Gaines; Jackie 
Wile; Cheryl O'Malley; and Mark Agostini. On an ongoing basis, the 
committee maintains and updates a map of the archaeologically-sensitive 
areas, helps protect the sites, evaluates and registers artifacts, and provides 
educational services. 

In 2012 MAAC conducted archaeological digs and research off of 
Foundry Street and South Street before construction projects were started 
on the sites. 

Marc Eames was appointed to MAAC in 2012. He moved with his family 
to Medfield in 2011, and he has had extensive experience leading and 
conducting archaeological digs in the Holy Land. 

MAAC welcomes inquiries from anyone who thinks a property in 
Medfield is threatened or finds an artifact that they would like to bring to 

57 



the attention of the committee; please contact John Thompson or any other 
member. 

C.B. Doub 

C.B. Doub lived in Medfield over 40 years. In October 2012 she moved to 
Concord, NH, to be closer to her family. During her time in Medfield, she 
made important contributions serving on numerous town boards and 
organizations, including MAAC, the board of assessors, the historical 
society, Medfield Television, the League of Women Voters, and First 
Parish Unitarian-Universalist Church. We miss her and wish her well. 

Want to join our commission? 

Vacancies occur on the historical commission from time to time. If you're 
interested in Medfield' s history, call any of the members, or show up at 
one of our monthly public meetings, and let's get to know each other. 
You could start as an associate member and become a full member if 
someone resigns. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Temple, Co-chair 

Daniel Bibel, Co-chair 

Maria Baler 

John Day 

Sarah Murphy 

Charles Navratil 

Ancelin Wolfe 

Cheryl O'Malley, Associate Member 

Doug Teany, Associate Member 



58 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 

OVERVIEW 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic 
Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main 
Street, enlarged in 1996 and in 2004. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT 
COMMISSION 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing 
body is granted under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40C. The purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and 
places significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities 
and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the 
district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to 
protect the character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic 
District Commissions govern such districts. Since each property owner 
within a district contributes to the overall historic character, changes 
proposed for the exterior of any property, as well as new construction, are 
considered in light of the impact they may have on the district as a whole. 
Before a property owner within a district is allowed to change an exterior 
architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive approval from 
the Local Historic District Commission. Approval is in the form of a 
certificate of appropriateness, hardship or non-applicability with respect to 
such construction or alteration. 



59 



There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts 
towns and cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, 
nor do they prevent new construction. The intent of any Local Historic 
District is not to halt growth, but to allow for thoughtful consideration of 
change, to allow changes and additions that are harmonious, and prevent 
the intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract from the 
aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local Historic District 
Commissions have authority only over the portion of the exterior of a 
building that can be seen from a public street, way or park. The 
Commission's Guidelines for Changes within Medfield Local Historic 
Districts is available upon request. 



HISTORIC DISTRICTS IN MEDFIELD 

Medfield passed "Historic Districts", Article 14 of the bylaws, and created 
the John Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town 
Meeting. This first district included for historic houses on west Main ■ 
Street and included the oldest portion of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a 
vote of the annual Town Meeting in 1996, the John Metcalf Historic 
District was enlarged to include a total of sixteen historic buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm 
Historic District, in 1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State 
Hospital, and the surrounding historic landscape. The buildings were built 
at the turn of this century, mostly in the Queen Anne Revival style, and 
are grouped around a large quadrangle, resembling the campus of a small 
college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield's third 
district, was established. It provides protection to the historic and unique 
grouping of the 18 th century Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and 
pond with gristmill that forms a widely appreciated and essential part of 
the rural character of Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created 
by unanimous vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to 
preserve and protect the character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 



60 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 

The Commission continues to review various changes to structures 
within existing districts and to explore the creation of a new district 
along Main Street that would include the Peak House and adjacent 
Clark Tavern. 

• The Commission has been working with the Board of Selectmen, 
DCAM and the Massachusetts Historical Commission to preserve the 
historically significant buildings and landscapes that make up the 
former Medfield State Hospital site. 

• We are always interested in assisting residents in the creation of new 
historic districts for their neighborhoods and always looking for 
volunteers to help with our efforts. 

• The Commission welcomes back Brad Phipps, a resident of the John 
Metcalf District. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Michael Taylor, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Brad Phipps 
David Sharff 
Connie Sweeney 



61 



Keepers of the Town Clock 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It has been another quiet year managing the Town Clock in the North 
Street Meetinghouse steeple. We have had numerous visitors view the 
antique clockworks over the year. The lSOO's clock mechanism and the 
1%0's electric clock motor keep chugging along with a little TLC. 

We did have one minor calamity when the northeast face mechanism 
stopped keeping time. The northeast face is the one (naturally) that gets 
the worst weather. Over time, the gear mechanism that moves the hour 
and minute hand on that face developed a little slippage. Ultimately one 
of the gears would turn but the hands would not. The mechanism was 
removed and with a little help from a hammer and tool, the reluctant gear 
shaft was peened into submission. 

This method is very much like the method by which the mechanism was 
first assembled many decades ago. It should be good for quite a while. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Maxson 

Marc Tishler 

Co-keepers of the Town Clock 



62 



Memorial Public Library 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the 2012 annual report. 

The numbers: 

Visitors 147,847 

Holdings 83,256 

Registered borrowers 8,360 

Items circulated 211,554 

Interlibrary Loans received 2 1 ,056 

Interlibrary Loans provided 33,587 

Self-check circulation 96.195 

Remote renewals circulation 27,475 

Reference transactions 4.826 

Children's programs 282 

Children's attendance 4.333 

Teen programs 86 

Teen attendance 6 "6 

Adult programs 159 

Adult attendance 1.563 

Room use 1,304 

Museum pass use 759 

Volunteers 1 3 5 

Hours volunteered 1 ,994 

Computer use 13,520 

Website hits 47.087 

Database retrievals 7,128 

Database titles 36 

Journal retrievals 5.590 

Journal titles retrieved 1 00 

E-book retrievals 168 

E-book titles retrieved 3 

E-book downloads 1.849 



63 



What we are: 

The Medfield Memorial Public Library is a gathering place that brings our 
community together, a 21 st century meeting house. Our mission is to 
educate and entertain people of all ages by connecting them to information 
and offering cultural opportunities. We strive to provide welcoming, 
convenient and responsive personal service. The library is an important 
cultural resource in Medfield and a leading force in the emerging Medfield 
Cultural District. The library and its Cultural District partners attract 
thousands of non-residents to town annually and are vital to the economy 
of Medfield Center. 

Collections, Programs and Services: 

We continued to operate on a tight budget, but complied with the 
Minimum Standards for Free Public Library Service in Massachusetts. 
Alternative sources, mostly The Friends of the Library, provided $43,660 
to enhance library services and programs. 

The Library was open fifty three hours a week during the school year, 
Labor Day to Memorial Day. We were open seven days a week including 
Sunday afternoons, four evenings after 5:00 pm, and additional evening 
hours for students during exam periods and First Thursdays. 

The Library received $7,500 in federal funds provided by the Institute of 
Museum and Library Services through the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners for a Library Services and Technology Act project On the 
Same Page, named Medfield Reads. This project resulted in sixty-three 
programs attended by 1,237 people from January through September. The 
library partnered with the Gazebo Players, Medfield Cultural Council, 
MEMO, Medfield High School, Medfield Historical Society, Medfield TV, 
United Church of Christ, Vine Lake Preservation Trust, and Zullo Gallery 
to create and deliver the programs. 

Demand for downloadable books for e-readers increased exponentially 
Kathy Brennan and Jerry Cianciolo donated funds to start a collection of 
various e-readers with preloaded books and applications that will be able 
to be borrowed. 

Professional Reference Service was available in person at the lower level 
service desk and by telephone during the open hours of the Library. 



64 



Remote access to Library resources was available 24/7. Service to 
residents who are homebound was launched. 

Building, Grounds and Technological Infrastructure: 

The main level browsing and recorded materials areas were recarpeted and 
the carpet behind the public service desk was replaced with more 
appropriate, padded matting. 

The wireless network was boosted and stabilized. 

The Friends of the Library donated three notebook computers for use in 
the library to augment the sixteen wired workstations available for use. 

A sofa and chair for the periodicals reading room were donated by the 
friends and family of Anthony R. Morra in honor and remembrance of his 
love of reading. 

Debbie McNamara donated a water color of the library by Jane Sugrue 
painted in 1981. 

Special thanks to Barbara Jacobs for color and design expertise, Girls 
Scouts Sophie Werner and Allegra Pericles for the creation of a native 
plant garden, Mandy Washburne, The Fox Hill Garden Club President for 
a donation of 755 spring bulbs planted by members of the club, the 
Medfield Garden Club for ongoing work to beautify the library grounds, 
and many members of the United Church of Christ for reconfiguration of 
the shelving. 

Staff: 

We are called to commit, work hard, produce, create and deliver the best 
services and programs to Medfield residents of all ages. In addition, we 
support and contribute to the larger library community in several ways. 

Matt Costanza chairs the Minuteman Library Network's Standards 
Committee and is a member of the Statewide Library Card Working 
Group. 

j Andrea Fiorillo contributed to an article on One Book/One Community 
Programs, Public Libraries, 51.5 (September-October 2012): pl4. 



65 



Mare Parker-O' Toole presented a table talk and created a website on 
Compassion in Libraries for the New England Library Association 
(NELA)'s Annual Conference. 

I continued to serve on the executive board of the Massachusetts Library 
System (MLS), worked on MLS Strategic Planning Committee, chaired 
the NELA Annual Conference and was elected president of NELA. 

Thanks: 

We appreciate the support of dedicated volunteers who expanded the 
capacity of the library's staff. Thanks to those who served as Trustees, 
Lauren Feeney, Chair and Friends of the Library, Kathy Brennan, 
President, and on The Library Trust Fund Board, Nancy Savoie, Chair. 
Also, thank you to the many people of all ages who gave their time and 
talents. 

We are thankful for the financial generosity of many individuals, the 
Friends of Library, and The Library Trust Fund. Finally, thanks to you, the 
residents of Medfield who support the library with your tax dollars to keep 
the Library certified, staffed with professionals, open seven days a week, 
filled with new and relevant materials, and free to all. We hope our 
services, collections and programs have helped you weather this economic 
recession and added value and enjoyment to your lives. We appreciate 
your support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Deborah Kelsey 
Library Director 



66 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield, 



Through the efforts of its talented and dedicated staff, the generosity of the 
Friends of the Library and the Library Trust Fund, and the support of 
Medfield residents and taxpayers, the Library remains a vital resource for 
the Town. At the low cost of $52.50 annually per resident, the Library 
remains a strong value for the town. 

For the 11 th year in a row, the Library's circulation exceeded 200,000 
items, the sixth highest circulation totals in the Commonwealth for towns 
our size. 

The Library is Medfield's 21 st Century Meetinghouse. The Library 
averages over 12,500 visitors each month, and over 150,000 per year. 
Many of the visitors are non-residents, bringing thousands of visitors into 
Medfield's downtown commercial center. 

The library staff is working to meet the shifting needs of its patrons and 
focusing on new technologies. More than 60% of those who are using 
library services in person are not borrowing library materials. They use 
the Library as a place to read, meet neighbors, colleagues, and clients, get 
tutored, attend community meetings, access the internet, or enjoy 
programs. 

The Library remains open seven days a week, including two evenings, to 
meet the demand for services. Extra hours during school exam periods 
make the Library an important study center for Medfield students. The 
library staff has worked diligently this year to insure the comfort and 
safety of all patrons of the library and its programs, on all three levels of 
the building. 

The HVAC systems of the building have been repaired and upgraded this 
past year. Six new air handlers and eight new thermostats have been 
installed to improve staff and patron comfort and energy efficiencies. 



67 



Capital improvements to the physical building have been planned and 
prioritized for the next 4 years. 

The Library continues its work helping Medfield residents in these tough 
economic times. The Business and Job Resource helps residents find jobs, 
and start or grow businesses. We provide Internet access and computers 
for those without vital resources for finding jobs and writing resumes. A 
networking group, which met weekly, currently monthly, is also hosted by 
the Library. 

The Library also continues its Writers Group, supporting patrons in their 
creative endeavors. Numerous programs throughout the year offer 
entertainment and information to children, teens, and adults. The staff has 
recently launched a Home Bound Outreach service for patrons not able to 
visit the building. 

The Library spearheaded the creation of the Medfield Cultural District, 
working with many partners, including: the Zullo Gallery, the Medfield 
Historical Society, the Dwight-Derby House, the Lowell Mason 
Foundation, Medfield TV, MEMO, the Downtown Study Committee, 
Medfield Green, Gazebo Players, Woodland Theatre Company, and the 
Vine Lake Preservation Trust. The Cultural District highlights the Town's 
cultural and historic resources. The Library recently hosted the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council's Cultural District Initiative and led the 
effort to have the Medfield Cultural District designated an official state 
Cultural District. The Library is also a key piece of the Cultural District's 
First Thursday programming. 

The Library successfully executed Medfield Reads, the Town's first 
community-wide reading program, as a Cultural District initiative. The 
Library hosted several events as part of the reading program, including a 
presentation by the author, an art exhibit in the Library, and an outdoor art 
installation. The program culminated in a field trip to Amherst, MA to 
visit the National Yiddish Book Center, founded by author Adam Lansky. 
Medfield Reads was supported by a federal LSTA grant through the Board 
of Library Commissioners. MEMO supported the initiative by designating 
the theme of this year's Medfield Day as "Medfield Reads". 



68 



None of this is possible without our staff. Our gifted, creative, and 
dedicated Director, Deborah Kelsey, leads a talented and hardworking 
staff. This year we welcomed Erica Cote as a Library Assistant in 
Circulation. Stef Aucoin was promoted to Adult Services Librarian. We 
bade farewell to Andrea Fiorillo, who has moved to the Reading Public 
Library. 

With over 500 members, the Friends of the Library support and enhance 
library services and programs. This year they donated three laptop 
computers for in-library use and most of the museum passes. The Friends 
funded all children's programs, the Summer Reading program, the Library 
Gala, many of the Medfield Reads programs, and several music 
presentations. We thank Friends President Kathy Brennan and all the 
Friends for their continued support and generosity. 

The Library Trust Fund supported new materials for children and adults. 
Our thanks to the Trust Fund Board and Chair Nancy Savoie for their 
support. 

Many thanks to Medfield residents and taxpayers for their continued 
generosity and volunteer time. With such support, the Library continues 
to provide vital services, collections, and space free to all. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Lauren Feeney, Chair 
Timothy Hughes 
Bob Luttman 
Maura McNicholas 
Steven Pelosi 
James Whalen 



69 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its 23 rd Annual 
Report. 

The Committee to Study Memorials was very pleased to officially 
dedicate the Robert E. Naughton Civic Square, located at the intersection 
of Causeway Street and Claypit Road. By vote of the 2012 Town Meeting, 
the square was officially named in Bob's honor. 

More than 200 people attended the September 29, 2012 dedication. 
Political dignitaries, family members, fellow police officers, loyal friends 
and many members of the community gathered at the "Robert E. 
Naughton Civic Square" dedication ceremony to pay tribute to the kind 
and courageous man. 

Robert Naughton had been a member of the Medfield Police 
Department. He was a caring and devoted public servant, a loving husband 
and father, a beloved friend to many, and had a special connection to 
nature and the outdoors. 

Naughton died in 2002 but a decade later, because of the works done by 
the Committee to Study Memorials and Eagle Scout candidate Peter 
Whelan, his memory lives on at the Robert Naughton Civic Square. 

The ceremony began with Richard DeSorgher, Chairman of the 
Committee to Study Memorials, addressing the crowd that gathered 
around the newly designed civic square. The National Anthem was sung 
by Medfield High School student Cara Daybre, and a Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Proclamation of Honor was read by State Representative 
Denise Garlick. 

Former Police Chief Bill Mann told memorable stories from the time he 
and Naughton were on the police force together. Town Administrator 
Michael Sullivan spoke next mentioning Eagle Scout candidate Peter 
Whelan and his involvement in this project. Whelan' s Eagle Scout project 
was to develop a landscape design of the Civic Square and then supervise 
the completion of that design. Whelan went on to say that he was very 

70 



thankful for all the help he received from the Highway Department, 
abutter Sonja Johanson, and the Medfield Historical Society. 

Todd Ferris, Naughton's son, represented the family and recalled planting 
two saplings with his Dad on that very spot when he was a young boy. The 
two saplings have since grown into 30 foot large pine trees and are 
now the backdrop of the civic square. 

Veteran's Agent and committee member Ron Griffin presented the 
Naughton family with the United States flag which had been flown over 
the United States Capitol on Sept. 11, 2012. Griffin explained that they 
chose that particular day because Sept. 11 th has become symbolic in 
honoring policeman and firefighters. 

The dedication concluded when Ferris and his mother, Karen Naughton, 
unveiled the civic square sign and then the granite bench bearing Robert 
Naughton's name. After seeing the beautifully designed and decorated 
civic square honoring her late husband (across the street from where they 
had lived), Karen Naughton said, "It's got Bob Naughton written all over 
it. He loved the town and the people in it." 

The committee also dedicated the Merchant Marine Flagpole at Baxter 
Park in honor and memory of long-time Medfield resident Roger Hardy. 
On Veterans Day 2012, the United States Merchant Marine Flag Pole 
dedication at Baxter Park in honor of Roger E. Hardy took place. Roger E. 
Hardy, a proud U.S. Merchant Marine, passed away in May, but those 
who knew him and loved him were determined to keep his memory alive 
in Medfield. 

The Committee to Study Memorials worked closely with the Hardy family 
and fellow WWII Merchant Marine, Jack Peterson, to make this day 
happen. The committee received financial contributions from the 
generosity of many so that a stone marker could be put at the base of 
the Merchant Marine flag pole bearing Roger E. Hardy's name. The Hardy 
family was there to participate in the dedication and unveiled the stone as 
well as raised the flag of the United States Merchant Marine. 

Richard DeSorgher, Chairman of the Committee to Study Memorials, 
served as emcee. Cara Daybe, a Medfield High School Student, sang the 
National Anthem and fellow Merchant Marines told stories about Hardy 
and how he survived many a situation that others did not. 

71 



Peterson spoke about his friendship with Hardy and their combined efforts 
to make known the injustices of Merchant Marine. This branch of the 
service was not recognized and those marines were not given the same 
benefits. Peterson and Hardy worked together at Medfield TV and the 
show became a nationwide program and one that is archived in the Library 
of Congress. Patrick Conneely, another WWII Merchant Marine, read a 
poem he wrote entitled, "A Sailor's Prayer," and presented a copy of it to 
Ruth Hardy. Ron Griffin, Veterans Service Officer, presented Hardy's 
son, Carl, with the Merchant Marine flag which was then raised on the 
newly dedicated flag pole. 

The Committee is continuing with its plans to replace all civic and honor 
squares with new signs and poles, similar to the ones unveiled at the 
Naughton Dedication. Our goal is to have all the new plaques in place by 
the end of 201 3. 

We thank the residents of Medfield, the Public Works Department, Chief 
Robert Meaney, the Police Department, and the Park and Recreation 
Commission for their continued support. 



Respectfully submitted 

Richard DeSorgher, Chairman 
Ron Griffin 
Frank Iafolla 
Jane Lomax 
David Temple 



72 



VETERANS' SERVICE OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This is my third report as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of 
Medfield having been appointed in September of 2010. Each year has 
seen increased activity by town veterans seeking information on veteran's 
benefits. I am very confident that each veteran resident has timely access 
to this office. 

As part of my veteran outreach effort I have appeared regularly on 
Medfield Cable TV. Appearing on "Happenings in Medfield" with host 
Jack Petersen, I have sought to educate our citizens on veterans' issues 
and benefits. Additionally I have written veteran articles appearing in 
local newspapers. 

According to the 2011 census, Medfield is blessed with a population of 
508 veterans. Most of these veterans are represented in our senior 
population with about 375 of them age 65 or older. Fewer than 50 
veterans were reported in the census as being under the age of 50. 

While there are a large number of programs designed to help veterans, 
filtering through the immense documentation defining those benefits is not 
for the faint hearted. Few veteran benefits exist for every veteran. Almost 
all benefits not only define veteran qualifications, but also carry additional 
criteria that must be met. I have strived to maintain the competency 
needed to identify and deliver information relative to these programs. 

Most veterans contacting this Veteran Services office usually walk away 
with information that leads to some benefit that provides long term help 
for them. Some of that helpful information is regarding non-veteran 
related programs or might include my direct assistance. 

During 2012, the town has delivered over $26,000 in chapter 115 benefits 
to area low income veterans and their spouses. In addition the town gave 
real estate exemptions exceeding $69,000 to veterans or their surviving 
spouse. The Veterans Administration has provided more than $700,000 in 
benefits to area veterans and their families. 



73 



The State of Massachusetts continues its aggressive support to those on 
active duty as well as service veterans. This was further demonstrated in 
unanimous acceptance of this year's legislation called the "Valor Act". 
Most of this legislation was in support of active duty service personnel as 
well as their families. The legislation provided support to those families 
during relocation or deployment as well as opening opportunities for 
transition back to civilian life and re-employment. 

Of particular interest of the Valor Act is the formation of a committee to 
"license" town Veteran Service Officers across the state. While the state 
does require each town to provide access to a Veteran Service Officer, 
there currently is no demonstration of competency required. 

As a member of the "Committee to Study Memorials", I was active in 
project development and dedication of the Robert E. Naughton Civic 
Square and the dedication of the Merchant Marine Flagpole in Baxter Park 
in honor of Roger Hardy. 

As a member of the "Medfield School Veterans Committee", I was active 
in the development and dedication of a Vietnam Memorial Plaque at the 
Blake Middle School. This memorial honored all those who attended that 
school during grades 9-12 and went on to military service during the 
Vietnam era. 

As a member of the "Memorial Day Committee" I participated in the 
planning of Memorial Day activities. During the Baxtor Park ceremony, 
Selectman Ann Thompson was presented an American Flag that was 
flown over Iraq by Lt. Col. Todd Caruso. That flag now hangs proudly in 
my office at Town Hall. 

New American Flags waved throughout Vine Lake Cemetery thanks again 
to the dedication of Frank Iafolla. Only two Memorials in town were un- 
recognized and they are at the State Hospital site. World War 1 Medfield 
residents Silas Arsenault and Arthur Cleversee were killed while serving 
and never returned to their homes on hospital grounds. While memorials 
were erected they stand in ruin today having been neglected totally by the 
state. 

Perhaps the most emotionally creditable veteran related project has been | 
the letters of thanks that eighth grade students write to our town veterans 
on Veterans Day. Blake Middle School eighth grade teachers coordinated j 

74 



through Seth Hellerstein provide supporting student curriculum. Veteran 
and student identities are protected resulting in the anonymity of both. 
Many veterans have relayed to me, often in tears, their appreciation of this 
small gesture of thanks. This was the second year letters were mailed out. 
This year's letters went to all area Vietnam Veterans, who seldom 
associate thanks regarding their military service. 

Veterans' Services hours of operation at Town Hall are scheduled on 
Monday and Thursday afternoons. Veteran hours are also regularly 
scheduled at "The CENTER at Medfield". Veteran Services is also 
reachable by phone at 508-906-3025 and through email at 
RGriffin@Medfield.net 



Respectfully submitted, 



Ronald Clark Griffin 
Veterans' Service Officer 



75 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

GIVEN BY TODD CARUSO 

LT COL (RET) USMC 

It is never over. Missions may end but the legacies left and the pain of 
their absence endure. 

By the time our last remaining troops returned from Iraq in December 
2011, nearly 4,500 of their comrades lost their lives during Operations 
Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. 

We continue to lose American heroes every day in Afghanistan and in 
military training accidents and missions around the world. The loss to 
their families, friends, fellow service members and country is permanent. 

Some were only teenagers and most of those killed were under age 25. 
In the eyes of their loved ones, they are forever young. 

Remembering our fallen once a year is not enough. The widows, 
widowers, fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters and children remember 
EVERYDAY. 

The empty seat at the dinner table, the smaller gathering on 
Thanksgiving, and the voice of a loved one heard only as a distant 
memory are constant reminders that they are gone. 

But there are also people who can enjoy time with their families 
because of the sacrifices that others have made. 

Scripture tells us that "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man 
lay down his life for his friends. 

Marine Corporal Jason Dunham epitomized this. A 22 year old native 
of upstate New York, Corporal Dunham was on patrol when his unit was 
attacked in Iraq. When the enemy hurled a grenade, Corporal Dunham 
used his helmet and body to smother the explosive, absorb the blast and 
save his fellow Marines. Eight days later, on April 22, 2004, he died from . 
the injuries inflicted by the blast. He was the first Marine to receive the 
Medal of Honor since the Vietnam War. 



76 



From the American Revolution to the Global War on terrorism, one 
million American men and women like Corporal Dunham have made the 
Supreme Sacrifice. 

They died so that we could continue to cherish the things they loved — 
God, country and family. 

That is why we are gathered here on Memorial Day... to honor the 
memory of our fallen warriors who have given everything for their 
country. 

We are also reminded on this day that in each generation, brave men 
and women will always step forward to take the oath of allegiance as 
members of America's armed forces, willing to fight and if necessary die, 
for the sake of freedom. 

In reflecting on the sacrifices of their comrades during World War I, 
the founders of the American Legion saw four common reasons or pillars, 
if you will, as to why Americans so often in the past and still to this day 
answer their nation's call — even to the point of sacrificing their lives. 

They do it to provide a strong national defense — to keep America safe 
and secure against those enemies who would destroy our American way of 
life. 

They do it for their fellow comrades... for those fighting by their side 
against all odds and for those who eventually separate from the military 
but proudly claim their status as veterans. 

They do it for American core values of God and country - family, 
patriotism and our religious heritage. 

They do it for their children... so that they can grow up in an America 
that is strong and free. 

It is through this last pillar - children... that we can continue the spirit 
of Memorial Day each and every day. 

More than 6,400 American men and women have died in Afghanistan 
and Iraq in the latest wars. Many were parents. 



77 



The innocence of their grieving children will be challenged by the 
dramatic change affecting the balance of security and comfort in their 
family routine. Their hearts will feel the sharp sting of their loss, leaving 
them only with memories of their loving mom or dad. Life as they have 
known it will be much harder from now on. 

There are many tangible things we can do to honor the service of our 
fallen heroes. First and foremost, is to take care of their families. 

We honor the living comrades of the fallen — the wounded, injured and 
ill members of our Armed forces through programs like Operation 
Comfort Warriors, Heroes to Hometowns and through the work of 
American Legion service officers. Often times these veterans are 
surprised that so many want to help them. We don't do this because of 
any requirements. We do it because we want to. It is simply the right 
thing to do. 

Army Sergeant Dennis Weichal (Why Kull) was one such man. 
Sergeant Weichal enlisted in the Rhode Island National Guard in 2001. 
He successfully completed a tour in Iraq in 2005 and was re-deployed to 
Afghanistan in 2012. 

When a young Afghan boy was picking up shell casings in the middle 
of the road, Sgt. Weichal acted with what his friends say was characteristic 
instinct. He pushed the boy from the path of a moving armored vehicle 
and sacrificed his own life so the boy could live. 

His friend, Staff Sergeant Ronald Corbett said, "He would have done it 
for anybody. That was the way he was. He would give you the shirt off 
his back if you needed it." 

Three young children in Rhode Island sacrificed their father, so another 
young child in Afghanistan could live. 

During the funeral, a National Guard Chaplain read a letter written by 
Sergeant Weichal' s son, Nicholas. 

"I really, really miss you," Nicholas said. "I promise I will protect my 
sisters, Hope and Madison, like you told me to. You are my hero. I know 
you are in heaven watching over me. You are the brightest star." 



78 



You are our brightest star, too, Sergeant Weichal And the sacrifice 
that you and your fellow Americans have made will not be forgotten! 

Memorial Day is not about picnics and parades - although, there is 
nothing wrong with enjoying and celebrating our American way of life. 
But Memorial Day is really about remembering those who made our way 
of life possible. 

President Kennedy once said "A nation reveals itself not only by the 
men it produces but also by the men it honors, the men it remembers." 

Of course today we equally honor service men and women, but the 
sentiment remains crystal clear. A key component of our nation's 
greatness lies in our ability to honor, appreciate, and cherish, through our 
actions and our memories, all those who died to ensure our freedom. 

Our American Flag is the most powerful and emotional symbol of our 
greatness as a country. The flag is our history, our dreams and our 
accomplishments, indelibly expressed in beautiful red, white and blue. 
It was carried in our Revolutionary War and we built a country around it. 

The tattered and battle worn flag waved proudly from the mast as John 
Paul Jones uttered "I have not yet begun to fight" and showed our enemy 
what true resolve was. 

This banner was raised by the hands of brave men on a God-forsaken 
island called Iwo Jima, and became part of the most famous photograph of 
the 20 th Century. That legacy lives on in the Marine Corps Memorial in 
Washington DC where the words "When Uncommon Valor Was a 
Common Virtue" are inscribed upon it. 

We are a united nation under this flag with heroes that believe America 
is important. Important enough to be defended, fought for and even died 
for, today we honor those heroes. Never forget those who made the 
ultimate sacrifice. 

Thank you all for coming today. May God bless each of you and your 
families; may God bless all those who served and are currently serving 
and may God continue to bless the greatest nation the world has ever 
known. 



79 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Health hereby submits the following report for calendar year 
2012. The Board meets on the second Tuesday of each month and 
encourages town residents who would like to be involved in any capacity 
to contact the Board of Health office at (508) 906-3006. 

Public Health : 

Jean Sniffin, RN, of Century Health Systems continues to provide 
programs in health promotion to all age groups, supplementing traditional 
home health services. The major components of the Health Promotion 
Program are Communicable Disease, Public Health and Health 
Maintenance. 

Prevention and control of communicable disease through caseload 
referrals, education and provision of follow up care consistent with public 
health practice. In 2012 the total surveillance disease reports numbered 

74. 

Jean is now available to residents every Tuesday at the following 
locations: 

1 st Tuesday The CENTER at Medfield 

2 nd Tuesday Town Hall - Board of Health office 

3 r Tuesday Tilden Village - Recreation Room 

4 th Tuesday Town Hall - Board of Health office 

The public is encouraged to contact the Board of Health office for more 
information on how this service can be of assistance. 

Sanitarian : 

Public Protection Specialists, LLC (PPS) professional staff conducted 
consulting services for enforcement of regulations related to food 
establishments, minimum housing standards, swimming facilities, 
recreational camps for children, and general sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health includes attending 
monthly Board meetings, inspections of food establishments and school 

80 



cafeterias, conducting establishment plan reviews and providing 
consultation to residents, business owners, and municipal departments as 
necessary. New food establishments are provided with consultation for 
the opening of their new businesses throughout the application process. 

In addition, PPS conducted public health emergency preparedness 
consulting services. This included updating the Medfield Board of Health 
Emergency Dispensing Site (EDS) plan and related Public Health 
Emergency Preparedness plans. PPS also completed several MA 
Department of Public Health Emergency Preparedness deliverable 
requirements. 

2012 Permits Issued: 

Food Services Permit 36 
(includes food retail, food sen' ice, food sendee kitchen and catering) 

Temporary Food Establishment Permits 14 

Mobile Food 2 

Tobacco 9 

Semi Public Pool 1 

Bathing Beach 1 

Camp 5 

Environmental and Civil Engineer Services 

William R. Domey, P.E., M.S.C.E., provides Environmental and Civil 
Engineering services to the Board of Health. These services include: 
Oversight of septic systems including soil evaluations, determination of 
high groundwater, review of engineering plans for compliance with Title 5 
and the Board of Health regulations, inspection of construction, evaluation 
of variance requests, and issuance of certificates of compliance; Review of 
Site Plans and preliminary and definitive Subdivision Plans for 
compliance with the Board of Health stormwater regulations and 
suitability for on-site sewage disposal where applicable; Review of On- 
site Well water proposals, water quality and quantity results, and treatment 
units; Review of Title 5 inspection reports that are performed in the town, 
most often at time of sale, to assure that the inspector has followed the 
state mandated procedures for the evaluation; Review of Building Permit 
applications for additions and renovations to assure that the proposed work 
does not conflict with the location or capacity of the septic system serving 
the property; Investigation of complaints regarding sewage overflows, 
odors, illegal dumping, hazardous w r aste, and preparation of enforcement 

81 



orders where applicable, and working with offending parties to attain 
compliance; Investigation of Beaver complaints and management; 
Issuance of Disposal System Installer and Septage Hauler Permits; 
Provision of general consultation to the Board of Health; Assistance to the 
Board of Health in the preparation of regulations and guidelines; 
Attendance at Board of Health meetings; and Telephone or office 
consultation for questions and information of residents. 

During 2012, as in previous years, a major focus of the Environmental 
Engineer/Agent has been septic systems, stormwater management, and site 
plan and subdivision reviews. As a result of a high degree of control over 
septic systems, the rate of failure of septic systems constructed since 1975 
remains very low. For those who must upgrade, it should be noted that, to 
assist homeowners to minimize financial burden, the Board of Health 
issues local and state variances as needed to achieve Maximum Feasible 
Compliance. These variances have to be justified by documentation of 
difficult or limited site conditions or excessive construction costs. 
Guidelines are available at the Board of Health office. 

Reviews of proposed Site Plans and Subdivisions for Storm Water 
Management and other environmental factors were completed, continued 
or newly conducted for Medfield State Hospital. It should be noted that 
the long-standing existing stormwater regulations of the Board of Health 
provide Town of Medfield compliance with much of the EPA Phase II 
program. 

A major focus remains the work at the Medfield State Hospital. The 
engineer is a member of the Medfield State Hospital Environmental 
Review Committee (SHERC) and participates in the various meetings and 
reviews of this complex project. 

The following permits were issued during 2012: 



9 


Soil Tests 


16 


Hauler Permits 


10 


Plan Reviews 


16 


Installer Permits 


10 


Septic Repairs 


9 


OFFAL Permits 


51 


Form A - Renovations 


6 


Well Permits 



82 



Medfield Youth Outreach : 

PURPOSE - Medfield Youth Outreach is a program located under the 
auspices of the Medfield Board of Health. The town's Youth Outreach 
Workers provide short term individual and family counseling, 
information and referral, crisis intervention, community programming, 
and assistance with access to financial assistance programs to Medfield 
residents ages birth to eighteen and their families. The Medfield Youth 
Outreach office is an intake site for the Federal Fuel Assistance 
Program for all Medfield residents. All of Medfield Youth Outreach 
services are free and confidential. 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the 
Town Hall. Appointments can be made by calling (508) 359-7121. Hours 
are full time and flexible to meet programmatic need. 

OPERATIONS- 

Director: Dawn Alcott, MSW, LICSW has served as the Director of 
Medfield Youth Outreach since 1999. 

Outreach Worker: Liz Loveless, MA joined the Medfield Youth 
Outreach department in July 2012 filling a vacancy as the Youth Outreach 
Worker. Liz comes to Medfield Youth Outreach with a love of 
community work established from her experience as an intern at Needham 
Youth and Family Services. Welcome Liz! 

Clinical Consultant: Carol O'Connor, MSW, LICSW serves as the 
Medfield Youth Outreach clinical consultant. 

The Board of Health Liaison: Marcia Aigler meets with Medfield Youth 
Outreach regularly as the Board of Health Liaison and communicates with 
the Board of Health regarding Medfield Youth Outreach issues and 
activities. In addition, Medfield Youth Outreach meets with the Board of 
Health every other month. 



SERVICES - 

Counseling Services - Counseling is provided to Medfield youth and 
families through individual therapy sessions and support groups. 
Counseling issues addressed frequently in 201 1 include: 
Academic difficulties, divorce, anger management, domestic violence, 
anxiety, family discord, grief and loss, financial difficulties, sexuality, 
body image/eating disorders, major mental illness, social skill concerns, 

83 



child abuse/neglect, substance abuse, dating violence, parenting skills, 
violence, depression, self harming behaviors, friendship/ relationship 
concerns, Autism spectrum and related concerns, sibling support, 
concerns around social exclusion and bullying. 

Referral Services -Medfield Youth Outreach routinely provides outside 
referrals for clinical services, needs based programs, substance abuse 
services, support groups, wrap around services, advocacy, and local 
discretionary funds and state /federal programs. In 2012, the upward trend 
in financial assistance requests/referrals to such programs continued. 
There was also an increase in referral to treatment for teen marijuana 
abuse. 

Programs -Medfield Youth Outreach also facilitates various groups, 
programs, and services within the community as able. This programming 
is related to the needs of youth and their families. The programs offered 
are often prevention and psycho-educationally based. Many programs 
reflect a collaborative relationship with other organizations. 

Youth Programming- 

Medfield Youth Action Committee (MYAC)- Started in July of 2011, 
seeks to provide a forum for Medfield 's youth to unite with the broader 
community. They strive to build bridges by forming mutually beneficial 
relationships with community leaders. It is their goal to: 

o Act as liaisons to community leaders in developing youth 

policy and programs 
o Provide education to youth regarding social issues with 
topics such as: Stress reduction, prevention, and healthy 
relationships 
o Link youth to service, volunteer and mentoring 
opportunities 

The youth in MYAC had a special meeting on February 1, 2012 with over 
30 community leaders who have shown interest in supporting youth 
initiatives. They unveiled ideas they had about a special community event 
that they had in the early stages of planning. They unveiled their hopes to 
host a community dance. They had a very fun meeting complete with a 
dance demonstration. They engaged with community leaders seeking their 
support to learn of their organizations needs as well. A goal to start a 
website or a manual about how youth can get things done in town was 
discussed. 

84 



MYAC experienced great success at its first community event on March 
23, 2012! A Community Swing Dance was a well run event with the 
MHS Jazz band playing swing tunes while teens, adults and a few children 
learned dance steps and had a wonderful evening. The teens that 
coordinated this event learned much about reserving space, food handling 
practices, timing of events, competing organizations, and more. 

MYAC fulfilled its mission to offer a workshop on a health issue to their 
peers. On November 14, 2012, Janet Fontana, RN, MA from Spectrum 
Life Works, came to present a workshop "Stress Recess" for youth grades 
9-12, from 6pm-7:30pm at the Medfield High School. This presentation 
was paid through the Mass Public Health Mini-Grant program. 

MYAC lost members in the fall of 2012 due to youth who had moved on 
to college. The group is in new stages of growth and welcomes new 
membership always! Some discussion has been presented to also create a 
MYAC "junior" group to include middle school age youth. Youth in this 
age group have been coming forward with their talents looking for a place 
to showcase them and to create programming for their age group! 
Montrose Partnership- Medfield Youth Outreach met with a liaison from 
Montrose School to discuss revitalizing ongoing partnerships in providing 
tutoring to Medfield youth and possibly Medfield Youth Outreach services 
to the Montrose population. 

Classroom Presentations for Medfield students- In December 2012, 
Medfield Youth Outreach enjoyed presenting on play therapy and career 
path in the Discovery Zone classroom at the High School. More 
presentations on a variety of topics are eagerly anticipated in the future. 

Support Groups- Medfield Youth Outreach is currently exploring the need 
for a group for older elementary school children who have siblings with a 
mental, physical or emotional disability after inquiries from families. 
Meetings have taken place to potentially get this group in motion for the 
late Winter of 2013 should enough participants sign up! 

Parent Programming- Two special "Community Conversations" were 
hosted in November of 2012 in collaboration with parent volunteer, Kathe 
Farris. The focus of these conversations centered around the many youth 
who feel disconnected from their peers due to "the drama" present in 
social situations. A youth focus group was also held as part of one of 



85 



these events. What was gleaned from these meetings were that youth want 
to stay under the radar about raising these concerns and that parents are 
seeking ways to support youth in building healthy communication and 
relationships. Plans are in the works to bring parent coffees to private 
homes to help parents navigate the social world of young teens for late 
Winter early Spring of 2013. 

Prevention Programming- Medfield Youth Outreach participates in a 
coalition Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP). This coalition is a 
growing body of professionals and parents who seek to reduce substance 
use in the community. In January of 2012, a grant opportunity came to the 
awareness of Medfield Youth Outreach for the federal Drug Free 
Communities Grant application. This grant was a highly competitive 
endeavor as very few are awarded nation-wide annually. Together with 
MCAP member and Medfield parent Susan Anderson-Navalta, a grant 
proposal was written and submitted. Although, MCAP was not a recipient 
of this grant award, it finished well in the process and the information 
gleaned provided support to the coalition in defining its future goals and 
direction. Medfield Youth Outreach was proud to be a part of this process 
and will offer its support should the coalition seek to apply for the Drug 
Free Communities grant in the future. 

Community Collaboration- Medfield Youth Outreach collaborates with a 
wide network of organizations to better meet the needs of Medfield youth 
and their families including: Medfield Public Schools, Medfield Police 
Department, Norfolk County District Attorney's Office, The South 
Middlesex Opportunity Council Fuel Assistance Program, Medfield Food 
Cupboard, Medfield Home Committee, The Medfield Angel Run Fund, 
Medfield Cares About Prevention, Riverside Community Care, Medfield 
Angels, Medfield Christmas Angels, Needham Bank Angel Tree, The 
Lyon's Club, The American Legion, and various other state and federal 
agencies, professional associations, clinical services, religious institutions, 
parent gatherings, and civic organizations. 

Medfield Youth Outreach as the gateway to giving: 2012 was a year of 
generosity that met many needs of residents through local collaborations: 

Medfield Angels: Many families found specific needs met during! 
long term illness from the support of the Medfield Angels, a network of; 
over 600 residents who make meals, provide hands on assistance, and 
rides to medical appointments. The Medfield Angels also supported the 

86 



Birthday Wishes program, providing gift cards to parents experiencing 
financial crisis to assist those parents in purchasing birthday gifts for their 
children. The Medfield Lyon's also continued a pilot program to provide 
care packages to residents experiencing a medical crisis, care giving 
needs, or cancer through Medfield Youth Outreach and Medfield Angels. 

Holiday Giving : This year the Medfield Youth Outreach Holiday 
Gifts Program served over 70 families through the combined efforts of the 
Christmas Angels and Needham Bank's Angel Tree. The Christmas 
Angels, a network of multiple Medfield families sponsored 38 families 
and many special requests. The Needham Bank graciously hosted the 
Angel Tree and served 28 youths' wants and needs through their 
programming. In addition, private families and residents sponsored 
families, made toy donations, held special parties to collect gifts and gift 
cards to further benefit families who have come upon hard times. The 
Medfield American Legion extended an invitation to families served 
through Medfield Youth Outreach to their annual Christmas party 
complete with a special visit from Santa for those youth young enough to 
believe! 

Year round help: The Angel Run (an annual run held in 
December) provided funds through the United Church of Christ's 
management that met the emergency financial needs of countless residents 
this year. In December 2012, the run transitioned from the Natasha 
Domeschek Fund to the Medfield Foundation whose mission remained to 
help local families. The run in 2012 was met with similar success as in 
past years. The fund will continue to meet the emergency needs on a one- 
time per year basis per request. The United Church of Christ generously 
adds to this fund through their ongoing ministries in addition to what is 
raised by the Angel Run in order that residents' needs are met. 

Volunteer programming - Medfield Youth Outreach welcomes volunteers 
of all ages to assist with the implementation of various programs and 
fundraising endeavors. Opportunities arise throughout the year. 
Assistance with youth prevention programs, parent education programs, 
and hands on assistance during holiday gift programs are predictable 
opportunities available. Mentoring opportunities for teens mentoring 
younger elementary age children are sometimes available. All 
volunteering is time limited with a specific purpose. Call the Medfield 
Youth Outreach office at 508-359-7121 to inquire. 



87 



Donations - Medfield Youth Outreach is always seeking to expand 
services and create innovative programming. Grant funding and donations 
have been utilized to purchase items for the office, cover the cost of 
presentations, and to cover programming related expenses when possible. 
Donations can be made to Medfield Youth Outreach through a check 
made out to the Medfield Youth Outreach Gift Account. For a tax 
deductible donation it is possible to donate to Medfield Youth Outreach 
through the Medfield Foundation. 



Norfolk County Mosquito Control District 

The following respectfully submitted by David A. Lawson, Director 

Our operations apply an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach to 
mosquito control that is rational, environmentally sensitive, and cost 
effective. 

Surveillance 

We are engaged in an intensive monitoring process through weekly field 
collections and data analysis in collaboration with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health (MDPH) to detect for disease-vectoring 
mosquitoes. Virus isolations assist us in focusing our surveillance to hot 
zones thereby allowing us to alert nearby towns of a potential epidemic. 

Virus Isolations in the town: no isolates in town in 2012 



Water Management 

Communication with residents and town/state/federal officials, site visits, 
monitoring, wildlife management, and land surveys while maintaining 
regulatory compliance is integral to the management of waterways that 
may contribute to mosquito breeding. Pre- to post-management 
documentation allows us to assess the efficacy of our work. 

Culverts cleared 25 culverts 

Drainage ditches checked/hand cleaned 2,570 feet 

Intensive hand clean/brushing* 200 

Mechanical water management 

* Combination of brush cutting and clearing of severely degraded 
drainage systems or streams by hand. 

88 



Larval Control 

When mosquito larval habitat management is not possible, larval mosquito 
abatement is the most environmentally friendly and effective method of 
disease control. An intensive monitoring program, aides in our decision to 
effectively target culprit locations. 

Spring aerial larvicide applications (April) 0.0 acres 

Summer aerial larvicide applications (May - August) 753.1 acres 

Larval control - briquette & granular applications by hand 1 1.3 acres 

Rain basin treatments - briquettes 

by hand (West Nile virus control) 412 basins 

Abandoned/unopened pool or other manmade structures treated 
briquets 

Adult Control 

Adult mosquito control is necessary when public health and/or quality of 
life is threatened either by disease agents, overwhelming populations, or 
both. Our rigorous surveillance program, along with service request data 
and state of the art GPS and computer equipment, allows us to focus our 
treatments to targeted areas. 

Adult aerosol ultra low volume (ULV) applications from trucks 
6,609 acres 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marcia Aigler, Member 
Kathleen Rose, Member 
Wendy Jackson, Member 



89 



LYME DISEASE STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Lyme Disease Study Committee is pleased to report on its 
activities for the past year. The Committee continued with its three- 
pronged approach to manage the health threat posed by Lyme and other 
tick-borne diseases: education, protection and deer reduction. 

Various efforts were made to teach about means of personal protection 
from tick bites as well as property protection from ticks. Toward this end, 
the committee published notices in the local newspapers and Medfield 
Patch in the spring and fall about the active tick season and provided 
methods for prevention and protection. Links to valuable websites are 
listed on our committee's page on the Town's website. An educational 
forum was held in April at The CENTER to provide information on tick- 
borne diseases for people and their pets. Symptoms, personal and 
property protection, and resources were shared. Posters published by the 
Mass. Dept. of Public Health reminding residents to check for ticks were 
hung in our schools and public buildings. A parental notice was sent 
through the school nurses to students' homes warning parents of the active 
tick season and methods to protect against tick bites. Tick check cards 
were given to all first and third graders. The committee developed a 
warning sign about ticks that was hung at entrances to about thirty walking 
trails around Town. At Medfield Day, information was available at the 
Board of Health booth. 

The committee also continued its organized deer-hunting program in the 
fall with its second season by qualified, volunteer, bow hunters on both 
town land and properties owned by The Trustees of Reservations (TTOR). 
The program again was successfully implemented and completed with no 
incidents or safety issues reported to the committee or the Police Dept. It 
was held during the Massachusetts state archery season from October 15 
through December 3 1 . Twenty-eight deer were culled. State hunting laws 
as well as additional requirements of the committee and TTOR were 
followed. Hunting took place from fixed tree stands placed away from 
marked trails. Extensive signage was posted on trails and entrances to the 
selected properties. Hunters were authorized after interviews and testing, 
including a proficiency test of their archery skills as well as a background 

90 



check by the Medfield Police. During the early part of the season, a 
number of illegal tree stands were discovered which were tagged with 
notices to be removed. Since these illegal hunters were eliminated, the 
only hunting occurring on town or TTOR land was through our strictly 
regulated program. Many Medfield residents thanked both committee 
members and bow hunters for making this effort to reduce the deer herd. 

As part of its broader plan, the committee is in touch with nearby towns to 
encourage education and deer reduction across the area. To this end, 
members attended a Selectmen's meeting in Weston to discuss bow 
hunting, and keep up to date on the recently formed commission's efforts 
at the state level under Representative David Linsky. 



Respectfully, 

Chris Kaldy, Chair 

Frank Perry 

Carolyn Sampson 

Erica Reilly 

Nancy Schiemer 

Lester Hartman, MD, Ex Officio 



91 




MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to present to you our Annual 
Report for 2012. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is 

located at 30 Pound Street. MHA is 

authorized and operates under the provisions 

of Chapter 12 IB of the Massachusetts 

General Law and is responsible to the 

Department of Housing and Community 

Development for the management of 

Chapter 667 Elderly/Handicapped 

Housing. The complex called "Tilden Village" consists of six two-story 

brick buildings with ten apartments. In addition, there is a community 

building with laundry faculties, a Management Office and Maintenance 

Garage. The facilities are managed by Executive Director John W. Hurd 

and Maintenance Supervisor Paul Hinkley. 

The office is open Tuesdays & Wednesdays from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM 
and Thursdays from 8:00 AM to 1 :00 PM. The maintenance department is 
open Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. 

The Authority Policies are established by a five member board of which 
four are elected by the voters of Medfield and one is appointed by the 
Governor. The current Board Members are listed below. 

Commissioner Roberta Lynch, Chairperson 
Commissioner Eileen DeSorgher, 
Vice Chairperson (State Appointee) 
Commissioner Eldred Whyte 
Commissioner Lisa Donovan 
Commissioner Neil DuRoss 

The Housing Authority holds regular meetings on the second Wednesday 
of every month at 7:30 PM in the Community Room at 30 Pound 



92 



Street. The meetings are posted at the Town Clerk's Office and open to 
the public. 

It has been a very busy year at Tilden Village with many facilities and 
operational improvements including: 

/ Final completion of a new complex-wide fire alarm system 

S Replacement of sixteen exterior energy-star doors 

S Installation of sixty new low-flow water saving toilets 

S Newly painted cross-walk and parking lines 

S New web site Medfieldhousing.org 

S New furniture in the Community Room 

/ New flower garden installed by the local Girl Scouts 



In addition, there were many tenant activities and services that took place 
during the year including: 

S The blood pressure clinic provided by the Board of Health and 
hosted by the VNA nurses in our Community Room on the third 
Tuesday of each month at 11:30AM for our residents and visitors 
alike 

S The students from the Blake Middle School again outdid 
themselves with a holiday dinner for the Tenants. This event was 
coordinated by Ellen McConnell from Blake Middle School and 
many parents were also on hand assisting the students 

S Flag Day dinner and new flag raising ceremony 

S A make your own ice cream sundae social cooled off an otherwise 
very warm night 

S Our local Girl Scouts hosted an international Tea and Halloween 
cider and cookies social 

We very much appreciate the volunteer assistance of many groups, clubs 
and tenants at Tilden Village throughout the year. 

The Medfield Housing Authority would also like to thank Town 
Administrator Michael Sullivan and many town departments including: 



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Fire, Police, Public Works and Council on Aging for their continued 
support and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 

John W. Hurd, Executive Director 
Commissioner Roberta Lynch, Chairperson 
Commissioner Eileen DeSorgher, Vice Chairperson 
Commissioner Eldred Whyte 
Commissioner Lisa Donovan 
Commissioner Neil DuRoss 



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COUNCIL ON AGING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The CENTER continues to provide valuable services to our senior 
community by providing transportation, meals, counseling, and a variety 
of other benefits. The Council on Aging remains under the guidance of 
board members: Louis Fellini, Chairman, Virginia Whyte, Vice 
Chairman, Neil DuRoss, Patricia Shapiro and Michael Clancy. Each 
member has been instrumental in providing support and direction to the 
Council on Aging and the facility. The Council on Aging staff includes 
Roberta Lynch, R.N. as Director, Cheryl Lavallee, LICSW as Outreach 
Worker, and Susan Bernstein, MA as the Volunteer Coordinator and 
William Pardi as Transportation Coordinator. 

The CENTER will celebrate its 5 th birthday on January 7, 2013 and we 
have planned a combined Valentine's Dance and 5 th year Anniversary 
Party on Saturday February 16, 2013. The CENTER serves as a hub for 
the older adults in Medfield, with over 16,500 visits for programs in and 
out of the building, with 800 active in-house participants. Often the 
CENTER is referred to as "a home away from home". We continue to see 
growth in participation and recognize that our services are vital to the 
growing older adult population. As we start our 6 th year of operations at 
the CENTER we will continue to add innovative programming to meet the 
changing needs of the community. 

In 2011, we received funding from the Metro West Health Foundation to 
initiate an Adult Respite Care Program for the community. The ARCP 
began servicing clients in March 2012 with dedicated staff. Medfield 
resident, Grace Nunziato, Program Coordinator has developed the respite 
program and it is an important component of what the Council on Aging 
can offer. Another Medfield Resident, Kathy Powers, ARCP Activity 
Assistant brings ideas and activities that meet the individual needs of those 
requiring guided supervision. The program is open Tuesday and Thursday 
from 9am-3pm and information can be obtained by calling the CENTER 
at 508-359-3665. The COA is fortunate to have been awarded a second 
round of funding from Metrowest Health Foundation to sustain this 
program for one additional year while we continue to grow and increase 
our client base. 



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Building maintenance and improvements are always evaluated and 
fortunately through the rental income we are able to provide the financial 
resources to keep the building in good repair. Rug cleaning, windows 
washed, floors waxed and buffed, parking lot restriping, a new freezer, 
updated the respite room with cabinets and paint, landscaping around the 
flag pole are examples of improvements that have been made this past 
year. 

The Council on Aging coordinates and works with other human service 
agencies, voluntary organizations, citizen's associations, governmental 
agencies, area agencies on aging and others in the community to provide 
services to the older adults in the community. The Council on Aging 
mission is to foster an atmosphere of wellness by addressing the 
emotional, social, and physical and often, spiritual needs of individuals 
and their families during the aging process. Our focus is to enhance the 
quality of life and promote independence through the sharing of 
information, programming, services, and referrals to appropriate agencies. 

The following is a sampling of the services the CO A provides: fitness and 
exercise classes, educational and social programs, food shopping 
assistance, friendly visiting, individual and group support, health benefits 
counseling, health screenings, health services, assistance with fuel and 
food stamp applications, supporting home delivered meals, home repair 
referral, housing assistance, medical equipment loans, legal assistance, 
Ride applications, snow shoveling program, social day referrals, 
transportation, wellness checks, veteran's counseling, salon services, daily 
congregate meals, tax work-off program and a variety of unique trips. 

As always, the Council on Aging and the CENTER would like to thank 
the Board of Selectmen and the citizens of Medfield for their support. It is 
your interest and support that helps the Council on Aging meet so many 
needs of the older adults in our community. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Roberta Lynch, Director 
Louis Fellini, Chair-person 
Virginia Whyte, Vice Chair-person 
Patricia Shapiro 
Neil DuRoss 
Michael Clancy 

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PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Parks & Recreation Commission is a five member, elected 
board of volunteers charged with the responsibility of providing safe 
affordable programs to Medfield residents of all ages in well maintained 
facilities. The Parks & Recreation Department provided over 300 
programs in 2012, managed 12 acres of landscaping and 13 acres of 
athletic fields. The Parks & Recreation Department manages the Pfaff 
Community Center, Metacomet Park, McCarthy Park, Baxter Memorial 
Park, Meeting House Pond, Dale Street Court, Hinkley Park & Swim 
Pond. We also perform grounds keeping and landscaping for the Town 
Hall, Library, Fire Department and Police Department. Several historical 
buildings receive landscaping services from our department including the 
Dwight Derby House, Lowell-Mason House and the Historical Society at 
the Medfield Library Annex. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; 
creating policies; generating diversified recreational and educational 
opportunities; monitoring the maintenance schedule for the properties we 
maintain; and advising the Director to achieve the goals set forth in the 
Park & Recreation Comprehensive Master Plan. The department is 
comprised of a Director of Parks & Recreation, Program Coordinator and 
a Equipment Operator/Landscaper. Additional Independent Contractors 
are recruited to teach programs and summer employees are hired for our 
camp and Aquatics Programs. The department's responsibilities include: 
creating, implementing, evaluating and adjusting year round opportunities 
to recreate; establishing fiscal and personnel plans to complete the 
objectives for each program; monitoring public property usage; and 
implementing an ongoing maintenance plan for the properties we 
maintain. 

The department continues to seek alternative funding to reinstate services 
that have been cut during the recession. We are also making 
improvements to the Pfaff Center and teaching classes in an effort to 
increase the activity level in the Community Center. Local volunteers 
have assisted in fundraising for community activities such as the Medfield 
Day 5K. The Equipment Operator/Landscaper has taught classes and 

97 



assists other departments when available. The department has also 
reviewed all of our contracted services and restructured our operations to 
further reduce expenses. 

The Parks & Recreation Commission has been meeting with the 
Permanent Building Committee to discuss options for the properties on 
Dale Street. Options include repurposing the Dale Street School into a 
recreation center, rehabbing the Pfaff Center, and building a new 
community center at another location. All of the proposals will include 
gym space for additional programs. Until that day comes we will continue 
to make the Pfaff Community Center an inviting place to gather. Recently 
it has been painted, floors refinished, doors replaced and drafty windows 
replaced with energy efficient windows. We strive to make the Parks & 
Recreation Department a vibrant part of Medfield by building community 
through activities. 

The Park & Recreation Department is dedicated to providing affordable 
programs that enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents of all ages. 
We offered over three hundred affordable enrichment programs 
throughout the year. Thousands of individuals have enjoyed participating 
in a wide range of programs, competed on our athletic fields, reflected in 
our memorial park and utilized our recreational facilities. Parks & 
Recreation is a vital and affordable resource that brings our community 
together. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents 
who volunteer their time and energies in our recreation and sports 
programs. We could not accomplish all that we do without your 
assistance. Please contact the Parks & Recreation office if you would like 
to volunteer or teach a program for the community. 



Respectfully submitted, 

James Snyder, Director 
Mel Seibolt 
Tom Cararagliano 
Rob Tatro 
Nick Brown 
Kirsty Young 

98 



BAY COLONY RAIL TRAIL STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Overview 

The Bay Colony Rail Trail is a proposed multi-use path approximately 
seven miles in length that traverses through the towns of Needham, Dover 
and Medfield. There are future opportunities to extend the trail northeast 
from Needham into Newton, and southwest from Medfield into Millis and 
beyond.The proposed path will replace the abandoned railway corridor, 
most recently operated by the Bay Colony Railroad. 

The Bay Colony Rail Trail presents a compelling opportunity to create a 
natural community resource. The proposed path traverses three 
communities linking residential areas to business districts, public 
transportation, schools, and recreation areas. At least half the distance runs 
through conservation land such as the Needham Town Forest, Dover's 
Wylde Woods, and the Sawmill Brook Conservation land. 

Medfield' s section of the proposed trail is a roughly 1.2 mile stretch 
between Ice House Road and Hunt Drive (in Dover). 

The Board of Selectmen formed Medfield' s Bay Colony Rail Trail Study 
Committee in 201 1 to study the proposed trail, report our findings, and, if 
it was determined that the trail was feasible, formally recommend the best 
approach to building and maintaining the trail. 

2012 Accomplishments 

Public Forum 

Our committee held an informational meeting at the CENTER at Medfield 

last April to discuss plans for the trail, present our latest findings, and hold 

an open Q&A with interested parties. Several questions and issues were 

raised during this meeting that provided additional areas of focus for our 

committee. 

Town Vote 

Medfield voted to approve our warrant article at the 2012 Town Meeting. 

The article asked the Town to approve the continuation of our study, 

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appropriate $1,000 to cover costs associated with the study, and allow the 
Town to apply to the Brownfields Redevelopment Access to Capital 
Program to offset the cost of liability insurance. The Town's approval 
included an amendment with several additional questions to be addressed 
by the committee. We intend to research these questions and adequately 
address them in our completed report. 

Lease and Insurance Investigation 

A considerable effort was made to understand the details behind the 
MBTA's proposed lease. In addition, the committee evaluated Medfield's 
insurance options to protect the Town against pre-existing environmental 
conditions. Details of the lease, as well as these insurance options, will be 
included in our completed report. 

Parking Recommendations 

Parking options for trail users was raised as a key concern at our April 
public forum. As a result, the committee has prepared several parking 
options near the trail head. Each of these options considers the concerns 
of trail abutters and neighbors that could be negatively impacted by 
inadequate parking accommodations. We intend to discuss these parking 
options in an open forum, and address them in our completed report. 

Four-Town Collaboration 

Our committee has maintained close ties with peer committees in Dover, 
Needham, and Newton. Several members have attended joint, four-town, 
meetings to share ideas, plans, and learn from other town's findings. This 
level of collaboration has helped us attain a cohesive view of the entire 
trail, while focusing on issues and recommendations for Medfield's 
section of the trail. 

New Committee Members 

Our committee welcomed three new members in 2012: 

George Hinkley: George is a life-long Medfield resident and local 
business owner. His experience in landscape design and construction is of 
tremendous value to our research and ultimate recommendations to the 
town. 

Robert Horgan: Robert is a talented attorney and has been instrumental to 
our MBTA Lease and Insurance research. 



100 



Jeremy Marsette: Jeremy is employed as Framingham's Town Engineer 
and is the Chairman of Medfield's Board of Water and Sewer. In addition 
to his extensive engineering experience, Jeremy is actively involved in a 
project to build the proposed Cochituate Rail Trail. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Erik Holm, Chair 
Al Brenton 
Bob Horgan 
Christian Dormer 
Graham Plonski 
Jeremy Marsette 
Susan Lynch 
George Hinkley 



101 



TREE WARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 3 1, 2012. 

Hurricane Sandy did little damage. We had to clear about ten trees blocking the 
roads and powler lines. 

NSTAR has been clearing branches and trees that are interfering with the power 
lines. 

We are still on the alert for the Asian Long Horned Beetle in Medfield. We 
recommend that all firewood should be purchased locally due to the concerns of 
the beetle. 

This year tree damage was minimal due to Gypsy moth. 

The contract for Hartney Greymont Division, Davey Tree, ends this year. A new 
contract is up to bid. 

There are still new cases of Lyme disease reported due to the high volume of 
deer in the town. 

We should remember that the Tree Warden position is a part-time position. The 
Tree Department works on average of one day a week with three workers. The 
Tree Department is also called out by the Police Department due to fallen trees or 
branches. 

The Tree Department would like to thank Lueder Environmental Tree & 
Landscaping Company for their help and professional advice throughout the 
year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be sent to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later 
than March 1 st of that year. This notice must be given each year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest and Pest Control 



102 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (TRIC) 

The Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIC) is composed of thirteen 
communities southwest of Boston. The name comes from the Canoe, 
Charles, and Neponset Rivers. The monthly meetings are informal, 
informative, and facilitated to make the exchange of information and 
perspective across towns the primary objective. Stephanie Mercandetti, 
Walpole and Karen O'Connell, Dedham, are Chair and Vice Chair, 
respectively. Taber Keally, Milton, is immediate past Chair. Three Rivers 
meets monthly at the offices of long time MAPC partner, the Neponset 
Valley Chamber of Commerce. 

Timely completion of the Canton Interchanges Project remains a critical 
concern for Three Rivers communities; the stated timeline for completion 
of this project is unacceptable. 

The third annual Three Rivers Legislative Breakfast was held in April 13, 
2012, at the Norwood Police & Fire Public Safety Building. The 
Legislative Breakfast brings together municipal staff, members of 
Planning Boards, Conservation Commissions, Boards of Selectmen, Open 
Space and Recreation Committees, and many other citizens serving in 
elected or appointed positions, for informal contact with their 
Representatives and Senators serving in the Massachusetts State House. 
Lou Gitto, Stoughton, and Steve Olanoff, Westwood, both sit on the 
MAPC Legislative Committee and keep the group well-informed on 
legislative advocacy and the legislative process. MAPC Government 
Affairs staff attends the meetings on a regular basis to review and discuss 
proposed or pending legislation of impact to municipalities. 

The Neponset Valley Chamber of Commerce (NVCC) has roots going 
back to 1894 as the Norwood Board of Trade; in the 1980s the 
organization changed its name to Neponset Valley Chamber of Commerce 
becoming one of the first organizations to define the region that is 
connected by the Neponset River running from Foxboro to Dorchester 
Bay. The NVCC has over 550 small and large member businesses 
throughout the region including companies such as Mercer, Siemens, 
Analog Devices, Organogenesis and Norwood Hospital. The NVCC has a 
long history of supporting and promoting economic development in the 
region by developing close partnerships with regional organizations like 
MAPC, and by establishing direct communications with local municipal 

103 



leadership within the Chamber catchment area. The current Chamber 
President is the Town of Norwood's appointed TRIC's representative. 
Additionally, the Town of Norwood was elected from among the thirteen 
TRIC communities to represent local interests on the Boston Regional 
Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Chamber works closely with 
MAPC on regional issues such as transportation, the environment and 
identification of cultural, historic and recreational assets within the 
Neponset Valley. A close partnership with the Chamber brings private 
sector perspective to TRIC, and to MAPC. 

The towns have benefited from the Sustainable Communities Project, 
based at MAPC but sponsoring projects throughout the region, many 
through the MAPC sub regional network. More information on the 
Sustainable Communities project, as well as detailed notes from each 
TRIC meeting can be found on the MAPC web site. 
(www.mapc.org/three-rivers) 

The Massachusetts transportation system is struggling under the burden of 
billions of dollars of debt and deferred maintenance. TRIC was one of 
several sponsors of a regional forum held December 5, 2012 to discuss the 
realities of a sustainably funded regional transportation system. 

With close long-term cooperation from the Central Transportation 
Planning Staff , the staff arm of the Boston Region MPO, TRIC has 
developed high levels of content knowledge regarding the Unified 
Planning Work Program (UPWP) and the Transportation Improvement 
Program (TIP), two very complex planning documents that inform 
transportation spending in metropolitan Boston. 

At the Planner Roundtable discussion held monthly, communities have the 
opportunity to establish commonly-held knowledge of local planning 
issues and projects, requests information from peers, identify state and 
national issues of note, and hold informed discussions on what's ahead for 
cities and towns. 



104 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning 
agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns 
of Greater Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth and regional 
collaboration, MAPC's work is guided by our regional plan, 
"MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region." Founded in 1963, 
MAPC will celebrate its Golden Anniversary this year. 

As we approach our 50th anniversary in 2013, MAPC caps off a year of 
remarkable growth and transition in 2012. With more than 200 projects 
underway at the agency, we have extended our reach into areas once 
thought incongruent with traditional planning: public health, clean energy, 
interactive gaming, education, community engagement and more. 
Becoming a leader in these emerging areas while furthering our bread-and 
butter planning work under our guiding plan, MetroFuture, has brought 
MAPC recognition as a leader in smart growth and regional planning 
nationally. We have been privileged to continue this work with support 
from the federal Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant, while 
mindful that the Sustainable Communities Grant enters its final phase in 
2013, and that we must be strategic and deliberate in planning to sustain 
that work. 

Sustainable Communities projects have continued to showcase the very 
best of smart growth planning and policy throughout Greater Boston, with 
guidance from our Metro Boston Sustainable Communities 
Consortium, which governs the grant. The Consortium now numbers 170 
member organizations, including 66 municipalities representing more than 
80 percent of the region's 3 million residents. 

A sampling of the work funded through Sustainable Communities in 
2012: 

• Creation of Housing Production Plans in communities across the 
region, including Bellingham, Foxborough, Sharon, Lexington and 
Watertown. 

• Zoning updates at Nantasket Beach in Hull, to increase potential 
for commercial development along the beach while adding public 
amenities and preserving cultural attractions. 



105 



• Re-envisioning Wollaston, a project focused on bringing 
economic development and housing opportunities to the Wollaston 
Red Line Station area in Quincy. 

• The Lower Broadway Visioning Project in Everett, which seeks 
input from residents and businesses on the revitalization of the 
city's Lower Broadway neighborhood. 

• The Orange Line Opportunity Corridor study, which brings 
together developers and local leaders from Charlestown, 
Somerville, Medford, Maiden and Melrose for coordinated 
planning along a stretch of subway ripe for transit-oriented 
investment. 

In addition to our Sustainable Communities work, we also implement 
MetroFuture by helping cities and towns through the successful and 
popular District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) program, which is 
an essential vehicle for helping communities to achieve more sustainable 
land use and more effective local governance. DLTA funding is provided 
by the Legislature and Governor to help cities and towns to collaborate 
regionally on housing, economic development, and regional service 
delivery. During 2012, MAPC had a total of 18 DLTA projects, four of 
them related to energy. One project in Metro West investigated the idea of 
bringing communities together to establish a regional natural gas refueling 
system for municipal vehicles. Another on the North Shore investigated 
regionalizing affordable housing services. The remaining dozen DLTA 
projects related to land use, and many were regional in scope. We expect 
DLTA to increasingly focus on housing creation in the coming year, as a 
reflection of Governor Deval Patrick's new commitment to build 10,000 
new units of multi-family housing per year — a first-of its-kind production 
goal that MAPC was proud to support. 

Another critical component to MAPC's mission is helping municipalities 
to create jobs through economic development. This year, MAPC worked 
on the diversification of the maritime economy in Gloucester. Fishing has 
played a dominant role in Gloucester for hundreds of years, but to stay 
relevant and forward-thinking, the city must now look to areas such as 
marine science and technology to bring testing facilities, research 
institutes and business incubators to Gloucester. Working with Mayor 
Carolyn Kirk, MAPC helped the city to obtain funding sources to locate 
an academic institution on the Harbor, so Gloucester teens can train 
locally in postsecondary fields related to marine science. MAPC is also 
working with North Shore Innoventures, a clean tech firm in Beverly, the 

106 



UMass Venture Development Center, the Dorchester Bay Economic 
Development Corporation, and many others to bring diverse economic 
development opportunities to many parts of Greater Boston. 

A reliable and diverse transportation network for pedestrians, cyclists, 
transit riders and motorists is an important component of the region's 
economic viability. Last year, MAPC helped launch the Hubway Bike 
Share system in Boston, with more than 670,000 trips logged since the 
program's inception. In 2012, we worked to expand Hubway beyond 
Boston's borders and into Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, where 
34 new stations were collectively added and countless new riders joined 
the system. Additional Hubway stations were also added in more 
neighborhoods of Boston, filling gaps in the network and allowing more 
people to take advantage of Hubway's convenience. Thanks to continued 
support from MassDOT and the Federal Transit Administration, combined 
with local momentum for expanding bike infrastructure, cycling is 
growing in popularity in Greater Boston, increasingly connecting the dots 
between transit stations for commuters and tourists alike. We expect to 
continue facilitating Hubway's expansion across Boston and into 
additional cities and towns in coming years. 

Last year, MAPC published our Greater Boston Cycling and Walking 

Map. A first-in-the-region foldable pocket map showing both walking and 
bicycling facilities, the pamphlet and its companion website were so 
popular this past year that we re-published both with some enhanced 
features. The new version includes more landmarks and street names, 
walking routes, hiking trails, nearby transit, bike lanes and Hubway 
stations, and is available through the mail by contacting MAPC, or online 
at trailmap.mapc.org. 

A hallmark of MAPC's work this year has been cross-department 
collaboration on interactive tools to engage the public in planning, 
particularly in communities that aren't traditionally included in planning 
processes. An outgrowth of our internal focus on cultural competency, 
these public engagement efforts have increased the diversity of 
stakeholders attending our community meetings and participating in 
decision making at the local level. And by better reflecting the diversity of 
the region, these efforts help us to foster more sustainable, inclusive 
project outcomes. 

In Quincy, our "Community Planlt" gaming tool transforms community 
planning into something fun and interactive. Using a gaming environment 

107 



customized for the project area — Wollaston and North Quincy — residents 
compete with one another to generate and debate ideas for planning in 
their neighborhoods. Empathy-based challenges might help a teenager to 
walk the streets as an elderly resident, or might allow a native English 
speaker to take on the daily routine of a recent immigrant. This social 
media game helped MAPC, the Asian Community Development 
Corporation and the city of Quincy to engage youth and linguistically- 
isolated, low-income Asian residents in planning activities, and allowed 
residents to participate in an online conversation about the impact of their 
decisions on diverse groups in the area. The project culminated in a 200- 
person visioning meeting which used more than 1,000 comments gathered 
in the gaming tool as the basis for face-to-face conversations. 

Over the past year, MAPC has expanded its regional and local energy 
technical assistance programs to support clean energy efforts and 
greenhouse gas reductions throughout the region. Through our Local 
Energy Action Program (LEAP), MAPC works closely with individual 
communities to help them plan and implement clean energy work in their 
residential, commercial and municipal sectors. We led several regional 
energy procurements, including one that brought 1 7 communities together 
to procure professional solar installation services on municipal properties. 
Additional regional projects include the hiring of an Energy Services 
Company (ESCO) for performance contracting, the bulk purchasing of 
LED street and outdoor lights, and the hiring of shared energy mangers. 
These regional projects are effective in using economies-of-scale and peer 
learning to help cities and towns overcome the financial, logistic, and 
capacity barriers that often slow or prevent energy projects from moving 
forward. 

This year marked our inaugural partnership with the state Department of 
Public Health (DPH) for a five year, $1.6 million Community 
Transformation Grant funded by the federal Affordable Care Act. Our 
efforts tackle the root causes of chronic illness, such as smoking, poor 
diet, and physical inactivity. In October, our public health team worked 
with the MWRA to open a 1.1 -mile section of a formerly closed 40-mile 
aqueduct system for public hiking, biking and walking trails; we also 
worked with Somerville, Medford and Maiden to open 2.3 miles of signed 
walking routes along the Mystic River using existing sidewalks and 
infrastructure. Maiden, Melrose and Wakefield collaborated with MAPC's 
public health staff to enroll four new schools in the Safe Routes to School 
program, which encourages children to walk and bike to school. 

108 



To help combat obesity, our team launched a healthy dining program 
with 15 restaurants in Maiden, Somerville and Waltham; each 
participating location agreed to offer healthier menu options, such as side 
salads, vegetable substitutions, and more. Finally, MAPC's public health 
department worked with youth in Cambridge, Everett, and Somerville to 
document community safety risks and assets through digital 
photography, using cameras provided to teens by MAPC. Each 
community held a local summit to showcase these "photovoice" images 
and to engage local leaders in discussions about the public safety issues 
depicted through the eyes of area youth. 

In 2012, MAPC also continued to innovate new ways to use technology 
and interactive websites to engage residents and use data for advocacy 
across the region. We built a web-based "calculator" at 
www.fixthet.mapc.org that let members of the public make their own 
recommendations about how to plug the T's $161 million gap through an 
interactive budget sheet. The calculator received thousands of hits from 
web visitors who submitted multi-varied proposals to fix the MBTA's 
funding crisis. MAPC used the results in our media work and legislative 
advocacy regarding the T's finances. 

In October and November, MAPC built on the success of our MBTA 
Calculator to launch the first-ever Hubway Visualization Contest, which 
challenged amateur and professional data wizards and designers to 
visualize just-released data on every Hubway ride to date — more than half 
a million trips. We received 67 submissions from across the country (and 
the globe), with the ultimate prize going to Ta Chiraphadhanakul, a 
doctoral candidate at MIT. His submission merged Hubway and MBTA 
data to compare trip times, and to calculate the time saved by Hubway 
users 

versus T riders. He demonstrated that Hubway provides a fast, efficient 
transportation option for the region's residents and visitors, all with an 
elegantly designed visualization. (Read more about the contest in our 
April map). 

To help our growing network of stakeholders find and use data, MAPC 
proudly partnered with The Boston Foundation this year to release the 
newest version of our Metro Boston Data Common, built using the open 
source platform "WEAVE." WEAVE allows Data Common users to 
explore data, create charts and maps, and find locally-useful resources, 
with full support from MAPC staff who offer monthly trainings and on- 



109 



call expertise. For more information and to get started, visit 
www.metrobostondatacommon.org . 

In December 2011, MAPC published "The State of Equity in Metro 

Boston," an analysis of how inequity creates challenges for people in the 
region in all stages of life: childhood, young adulthood, adulthood, and the 
senior years. Although the region as a whole has become far more diverse 
over the past decade, this report showed that deep divisions and inequity 
remain. We explored these challenges in our 2011 report, which is 
available online at www.regionalindicators.org , and we are now following 
up with a policy- focused plan for 2013. After the release of the State of 
Equity Indicators Report in December 201 1, MAPC turned immediately to 
developing an action agenda for equity in the region, working with 
stakeholders from throughout Metro Boston. The report will be released, 
and we will begin working to advance the agenda, throughout the winter 
and spring of 2013, so stay tuned for ways to get involved. 

Implementing MetroFuture through every facet of our planning work is a 
core value at MAPC. The internal team devoted to building a stronger 
corps of MetroFuture supporters has done a remarkable job of reaching 
new constituents this year. Our "Friends of MetroFuture" database 
numbers more than 2,000 at the close of 2012, with a full roster of "Walks 
and Talks" activities in the works for 2013. Past Walks and Talks events 
have included an historical tour of Fields Corner in Dorchester; a walking 
tour of River's Edge, the rehabilitated brownfields site along the Maiden 
River; a lecture on sustainable food production with author Julian 
Agyeman from Tufts University; and the ever-popular tour of Deer 
Island's Sewage Treatment Plant in Boston Harbor. With something 
planned every month, it's easy to get involved with MAPC and connected 
to MetroFuture through Walks and Talks. For more information about 
events and to become a Friend of MetroFuture, visit the new home of 
MetroFuture on the web: www.mapc.org/metrofuture . 

As our work expands into new and innovative areas, a key mission of 
MAPC remains the drive to help municipalities collaborate across their 
borders, saving money and time by becoming more efficient, while 
improving the quality of service to residents. A prime example is our 
unique Fire Apparatus Collective Purchasing Program. Last year, six 
months after launching the state's first collective purchasing contracts for 
fire apparatus, MAPC and the Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts 
(FCAM) brought Boston into the partnership, giving the program 

110 



significant momentum. Now, with the program in its second year, our staff 
has worked with 17 chiefs across the state, all of whom have taken an 
active role in shaping the program and its contracts. To date, 45 units of 
fire apparatus (including pumpers and aerials) have been purchased since 
the program's inception in 2010, representing total sales of close $21.5 
million and a savings of nearly $900,000 for local fire departments. In 
addition to aerial apparatus and pumper apparatus, ambulances have just 
been added to the FCAM contract, and the first unit sold in November. 
This exciting new addition to our portfolio is expected to post strong sales 
in 2013 and beyond. 

In keeping with our mission to promote regional collaboration, MAPC 
continues to facilitate the operation of the Northeast Region Homeland 
Security Advisory Council (NERAC). Three NERAC cache sites located 
in Beverly, Framingham and Lexington contain equipment to help the 
region prepare for and respond to major events such as natural or man- 
made disasters, by providing resources that municipalities typically can't 
afford to purchase individually. NERAC assets were deployed in such 
major disasters as Super Storm Sandy this year, making 2012 a year of 
deep need in terms of emergency planning and preparedness. 

2012 marked a time of tremendous success for MAPC's legislative 
agenda. We were gratified to see several years of hard work and advocacy 
around the Community Preservation Act (CPA) come to fruition in 2012, 
when the Legislature increased the state matching fund and passed several 
reforms making it easier to adopt and use CPA. A total of 1 1 communities 
adopted CPA this year thanks to these reforms, including six 
municipalities in the MAPC region. MAPC also worked with SWAP 
subregion communities to support legislation that regulates the use of 
phosphorous fertilizers, as a way to reduce pollution and comply with 
challenging EPA regulations. 

Additionally, our Government Affairs team drafted language for a 
transportation bill that enables the MBTA and Regional Transit 
Authorities (RTAs) to receive additional funding and avoid even worse 
fare hikes and extreme service cuts. 

As the debate around transportation funding in Massachusetts heats up 
again in 2013, MAPC is once more taking a strong role in the debate 
through our Transportation Finance Campaign. With our allies in 
Transportation for Massachusetts (T4MA) and the Massachusetts 
Association of Planning Agencies (MARPA), we are committed to 

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creating a sustainable, long-term solution to our transit and roadway 
funding gaps, and generating more money for bike and pedestrian 
infrastructure. MAPC hosted several public forums throughout the year, 
including one major summit in South Station on June 11 that brought 
together more than 300 mayors, city managers, transit advocates and 
commuters to rally for a 21st-century transportation system for the entire 
state. A second forum took place in early December in Braintree. We will 
be continuing this campaign right into 2013. If you are interested in 
joining us, visit our website to get started. 

As we look toward 2013 and our 50th anniversary as Greater Boston's 
regional planning agency, MAPC remains committed to fostering a 
vibrant, more livable region by furthering the progressive goals of 
MetroFuture. Much about the region has changed during the last five 
decades, but our commitment to serving the people who live and work in 
our region remains steadfast. 

Interested in staying in touch with us throughout the year? Visit 
www.mapc.org for news, project updates and ways to connect with us 
in 2013, including information on our anniversary celebrations. We 
look forward to commemorating 50 years with you in 2013, and to 
planning for the next generation of our region's future together. 



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COUNTY OF NORFOLK 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

Incorporated in 1793, the County of Norfolk includes twenty-eight cities 
and towns, mostly located to the South and West of Boston. Norfolk 
County is known as the County of Presidents because it is the birthplace of 
four Presidents of the United States: John Adams, John Quincy Adams, 
John F. Kennedy and George Herbert Walker Bush. 

County government is responsible for regional services, among which are 
the Registry of Deeds, County Agricultural High School, County 
Engineering, Wollaston Recreational Facility, and Trial Court facilities 
maintenance. 

County revenues are directly impacted by conditions in the real estate and 
credit markets. In recent years, the County has met the challenges of the 
national recession. The County has minimized operating expenditures 
while seeking to maintain and improve services. 

Capital improvements have continued at County facilities, including our 
Courthouses and the Registry of Deeds. In cooperation with the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority, Norfolk County Agricultural 
High School this year began construction of a major renovation and 
expansion project at its Walpole campus. 

As in past years, we wish to take this opportunity to thank the County's 
department heads and employees, as well as elected officials, both state 
and local, for all their efforts on behalf of Norfolk County and its 
communities. 

As County Commissioners, we are privileged to serve you. 



Very truly yours, 

Francis W. O'Brien, Chairman 
John M. Gillis 
Peter H. Collins 



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NORFOLK COUNTY REGISTRY OF DEEDS 

William P. O'Donnell, Register 
649 High St., Dedham, MA 02026 

The Registry of Deeds is the principle office for real property records in 
Norfolk County. The Registry receives and records hundreds of thousands 
of documents each year, and is a basic resource for title examiners, 
mortgage lenders, municipalities, homeowners, and others with a need for 
land record information. 

The Registry operates under the supervision of the elected Register, 
William P. O'Donnell. In over two hundred years of continuous operation, 
the Registry's objectives have remained the same; accuracy, reliability and 
accessibility for the residents, businesses and communities of Norfolk 
County. 

• Register O'Donnell and his staff continue to visit town halls, 
senior centers and civic groups across Norfolk County. Register 
O'Donnell visited Medfield Town Hall on September 12th. 

• The full service telephone and walk-in Customer Service and Copy 
Center continues to provide residents and businesses of Norfolk 
County with quality customer assistance in all areas of Registry 
operations. 

• Multiple technological improvements were implemented in 2012 
including an upgrade of the Registry's server and the introduction 
of an improved Registry of Deeds website. The Registry's new 
website www.norfolkdeeds.org is regularly updated and enhanced 
to include recent news, resources for homeowners, real estate 
statistics and answers to frequently asked questions. 

• Our ongoing community programs; Suits for Success, the Annual 
Holiday Food Drive, Cradles to Crayons and Toys for Tots 
Collection were once again successful thanks to the generosity of 
Registry employees as well as many residents and businesses 
across Norfolk County. 

• Improvements to the physical and structural appearance of the 
historic Registry Building continued in 2012 with the installation 
of new energy efficient windows throughout the facility. 

114 



• Electronic recording which allows for documents to be sent for 
recording via the internet has attracted interest from the real estate 
business community. 

• The internet library of images accessible to the public through the 
Registry of Deeds online research system at 
www.norfolkdeeds.org continues to expand. All documents back to 
the first documents recorded in Norfolk County in 1793 are 
available for viewing online. 

Real estate activity in Medfield, MA during 2012 showed increases across 
all measurement categories with the exception of foreclosure deeds which 
remained even with 201 1 numbers. 

There was a 27% increase in documents recorded at the Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds for Medfield during 2012 at 4,341 which was 919 more 
documents than the 201 1 total of 3,422. 

The total volume of real estate sales in the Town of Medfield during 2012 
was $126,833,801.00 which showed a 45% increase over 2011. The 
average sale price of deeds over $ 1 ,000 (both residential and commercial 
properties) was up in Medfield by 11% in 2012 at $634,169.01 which 
showed a $65,354.59 increase over 2011. 

The number of mortgages recorded on Medfield properties in 2012 was up 
by 35% from 2011 at 1,253, while total mortgage indebtedness increased 
by 39% to $421,895,527.00 from the 201 1 total of $302,801,652.00. 

The number of foreclosure deeds filed in Medfield during 2012 remained 
even with the 2011 total at 3 filings, while the number of notice to 
foreclose mortgage filings increased by 7 with 13 filings during 2012 
compared to 6 filings in 201 1. 

Finally, homestead activity was on the rise in Medfield during 2012 with 
329 homesteads filed representing a 16% increase over the 2011 total of 

283. 

The modernization and business improvements that have enhanced our 
ability to provide first rate customer service to residents and businesses of 
Norfolk County will continue. I have been and always will be committed 



115 



to an efficient customer service oriented operation here at the Registry. It 
is a privilege to serve as your Register of Deeds. 

Respectfully submitted by, 



^/j/^f m 



William P. O'Donnell 

Norfolk County Register of Deeds 





116 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

The School Committee reorganized in July of 2012, and elected Jonathan 
Dowse from Sherborn as its Chair, Donald Seymour from Norfolk as its 
Vice Chair, and Christine Geering from North Attleborough as its 
Secretary. Monthly meetings continued to be held on the third Wednesday 
of each month at the school. Subcommittee meetings were held as needed. 

Tri-County's secondary program, postsecondary program and continuing 
education program experienced continued enrollment growth. The 
ongoing increase in numbers is recognition of our successful three-fold 
mission: high vocational standards to train the workforce; high academic 
standards to prepare students for college; and high community service 
standards to prepare good citizens. These standards are visible in the 
achievements of our students and in their services throughout our member 
towns. 

In these difficult economic times, the vocational and civic skills of our 
students are extremely helpful when plumbing, carpentry, electrical and 
other programs work on public sector buildings and projects to save our 
towns labor costs. The vocational skills of our students can also be 
witnessed by a visit to Tri-County to take advantage of services such as 
Culinary Arts, Cosmetology, Auto Collision and Auto Technology. 

The academic skills are visible in our students' achievements such as 
hosting the state-wide Vocational Mathematics Competition, participating 
with MIT in the NASA HUNCH (High School Students United with 
NASA to Create Hardware) program or scoring well in the High Schools 
That Work Assessment. Their academic skills are also evident when all 
students have passed MCAS since 2005 or when 68% of the graduating 
class continues on to further education. 

Their citizenship skills are also to be observed throughout the member 
towns as each one performs his/her annual mandatory community service. 
Look for them as they undertake projects to improve their local 
community oftentimes utilizing skills learned in their respective program 
majors here at Tri-County RVTHS. We were especially proud to be 
honored for excellence in energy and environmental education at the State 
House. Tri-County received a First Honors Certificate of Excellence 
award for clean energy initiatives which range from the installation of a 

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photovoltaic training structure and the formation of the TC Green Club to 
the creation of an organic vegetable garden by the Student Council. 

Recognition belongs not only to Tri-County's students and staff but to its 
School Committee as well. Through the ongoing efforts of various 
subcommittees, the Tri-County School Committee has been able to 
accomplish several significant milestones. Tri-County received 
preliminary approval for a Massachusetts State Building Authority science 
grant to renovate our science labs. In addition, and most impressively, 
with the guidance of the School Committee, Tri-County has been able to 
operate school on a required minimum contribution budget. In other 
words, for the last four years, Tri-County has not asked member towns to 
contribute anything more than what the State has determined each town 
must contribute for the education of its students at Tri-County. The 
Committee recognizes the economic stress prevalent in our member towns 
and works collaboratively for the betterment of all. 

Graduation 

Two hundred seven students graduated in a notable afternoon ceremony 
on Sunday, June 3, 2012. Superintendent-Director, Stephen Dockray, 
presided over the ceremony. School Committee members, Jonathan 
Dowse and Victor Knust Graichen, presented diplomas to the graduates. 
Adele Sands, Director of Student Services, presented scholarships and 
awards totaling $57,750 to deserving seniors. The grand total of 
scholarships and awards for the class of 2012 was $615,000. 

Guidance & Special Education Services 

In September, 2011, Tri-County welcomed 1006 students to the new 
school year. The respective number of students from member towns was 
as follows: Franklin - 210, Medfield - 12, Medway - 64, Millis - 38, 
Norfolk - 37, North Attleborough - 258, Plainville - 99, Seekonk - 64, 
Sherborn - 4, Walpole - 63, and Wrentham - 80. 

During the 2011-2012 school year, the Guidance department continued its 
programs to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and 
district communities. The Guidance department provided counseling for 
students in career pathways and postsecondary education. Tri-County 
continues to work with the Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education on its development of Your Plan For College, a no-cost, 
comprehensive college and career planning portal designed to help 
Massachusetts students manage their educational and career pathways. 

118 



Tri-County was again named 2012 Top of Class by Your Plan For College 
and was honored by membership into its 201 1-2012 Circle of Champions. 
Tri-County earned this distinction by performing in the top ten percent of 
Massachusetts high schools that engaged students and parents through 
Your Plan for College during the 2011-12 school year. Tri-County' s 
faculty and staff were recognized for helping students better prepare for 
college and careers. 

Tri-County hosted Career Days for over 2,000 Grade 8 students from the 
regional districts. The Guidance department, with assistance of personnel 
from the Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority (MEFA), 
presented programs on college preparation. 

The Special Education department has been working diligently to develop 
a more comprehensive service delivery structure. General education and 
special education faculty have met together for professional development 
in order to establish new methods of instruction, including co-teaching. 

The Special Education Parent Advisory Council met monthly and 
discussed topics such as college admissions. Dana Walsh, School Social 
Worker, also spoke on school anxiety and teen mental health during a well 
attended meeting. 

Academics 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School continues to earn 
wide-spread recognition for academic and vocational success by 
combining rigorous and challenging academic courses with modern 
vocational studies. The initiatives implemented through High Schools 
That Work allow Tri-County to be recognized as a forerunner in 
vocational education. Implementation of the newest technology as well as 
innovative vocational technical programs ensures student success. Their 
success is measured in the classroom and ultimately in a chosen career 
path whether it is higher education, entrance in their vocational trade or 
military careers. 

All students completed the Mass Core Curriculum requirement which is 
the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education recommended 
academic program for college and career readiness. 



119 



More than 60 seniors from the Class of 2012 were awarded John and 
Abigail Adams Scholarships. These scholarships are awarded to students 
who achieve two advanced scores or one advanced and one proficient 
score on the Grade 10 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Biology 
MCAS exams. 

In the spirit of continuous improvement, Tri-County held a Senior Project 
Summit designed to review and evaluate all aspects of the Senior Project 
initiative which has been recognized by HSTW as a promising practice for 
developing 21 st century skills that integrates academic learning with career 
technical education. The Senior Project allows students to discover how 
their academic knowledge and career technical skills can be integrated to 
create three components - a research paper on a topic in their assigned 
technical field, a related product or service, and a formal presentation. 

Another area of recognition was the local Voice of Democracy Contest. 
The Voice of Democracy Contest was created in 1947 to foster patriotism 
by allowing students in grades 9 through 12 to voice their opinions on an 
annual theme. Many of our local students participated by composing 
essays, stories, and scripts based on a theme. In November 2011, three 
Tri-County students were chosen as winners of the WW Post 3402 Voice 
of Democracy Contest based on recordings of their essay scripts 
addressing the theme, "Is There Pride in Serving in Our Military?" One 
student received additional recognition by winning the Norfolk County 
District 5 competition. 

Finally, Tri-County continued its leadership efforts within the vocational 
math community by hosting the Fifteenth Annual Vocational Mathematics 
Competition in the Kenneth Custy Gymnasium with thirteen vocational 
schools from throughout the State competing for top honors. Tri-County's 
Mathematics team placed third in the competition made up of 30 teams. 

Vocational Technical Programs 

Students in the Vocational Technical Programs experienced many 
successes, both school wide, and in their individual career areas. The 
grade 10 students from every vocational program completed the 10-hour 
OSHA training program in November. The training included interactive, 
specialized training in construction and general industry health and safety 
standards. All students passed the required exam and received a 10-hour 
OSHA card. 



120 



Tri-County students again achieved success at the State SkillsUSA 
Competition. The State SkillsUSA T-shirt was designed by a student in 
our Graphic Communications Program. Also, a senior student won the 
gold medal for extemporaneous speech in the State SkillsUSA 
Competition. Both of these students competed in Kansas City at the 
National SkillsUSA Conference this past June. 

Tri-County again received a grant from the U.S. Army to help fund the 
Robotics Team. J.C Penny and the EMC Corporation also sponsored our 
Robotics team. The Robotics team, named "Tri Force" was busy this year 
competing at the FIRST Robotics Competition in April at Boston 
University, at the Beantown Blitz Competition at Northeastern University, 
and at the WPI Robotics Competition. 

The CIS students competed at Bristol Community College and came away 
with many medals and awards in their respective computer literacy 
categories. 

Auto Collision Repair : Students in the Auto Collision Repair program 
continued to serve the needs of the community and the Tri-County District 
by repairing vehicles under the supervision of their instructors. Students 
participated in field trips to emphasize the diverse career opportunities for 
students pursuing a career in this field. In preparation for the school year 
2012-2013, the students prepared an estimate to repair a 1999 Jaguar for 
the Medway Senior Center. We are proud that the Auto Collision 
Program met all standards for continued NATEF Certification at the mid- 
cycle review. 

Auto Technology : Auto Technology, one of the most popular programs at 
Tri-County, continued to maintain school vehicles, and repaired and 
serviced cars, trucks and motorcycles owned by residents in the eleven- 
town district. Students participated in the AYES shadowing program by 
observing employees in local auto repair shops, to learn the many aspects 
of the career. 

Both Collision Repair and Auto Technology continue to be ASE Certified 
from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation. This 
nationally recognized certification is considered to be the highest 
achievement known in the Automotive Industry. 



121 



Carpentry : The Carpentry students were busy working at several outside 
community projects this past year. Some notable community based 
projects included constructing signposts for a third grade class in Medway. 
The signposts will be displayed at historical sites in the town adorned with 
artwork done by the children. The Carpentry students also built garden 
sheds for both the Franklin Community Gardens and the Sherborn 
Woodhaven Elder Housing Complex. Many seniors received their pre- 
apprenticeship cards through the Massachusetts Division of 
Apprenticeship Training. The cards were issued to students who 
successfully completed all requirements for graduation from a Chapter 74 
approved Carpentry program and achieved at least a 3.0 GPA. 

Computer Information Systems : Students in the CIS Program again 
successfully completed many certification exams, such as MOS, IC and 
A+. Tri-County continued as a Prometric Testing Center, giving our 
students the opportunity to take these exams on site. The CIS students 
also partnered with the Engineering students on the Robotics Team, 
developing the computer codes to allow the robot to function. Two notable 
projects completed by students in CIS were the development of websites 
for the Town of Norfolk and the Sons of Italy in Franklin. 

Construction Craft Laborer : Now in its third year at Tri-County, the 
Construction Craft Laborer students continued to participate in field trips 
at the NELTA Training Center in Hopkinton. Six grade eleven students 
received Hazard Communication Training and received a certificate of 
successful completion. Also, the junior class began construction of an 
outside classroom at the site of the former Tri-County tennis courts. 

Cosmetology : The Cosmetology Program continues to operate a full 
service hair and nail salon for members of the eleven towns in our district. 
Several Senior Citizen groups enjoyed hair and nail services by the grade 
1 1 and 12 Cosmetology students. The students traveled to Assisted Living 
Centers in district communities to provide services to the residents. They 
also participated in Teacher Appreciation Week at an elementary school in 
Plainville where they offered manicures to the teachers. The grade 9 and 
grade 10 students welcomed many guest speakers to promote various 
career opportunities for both men and women in the beauty industry. The 
grade 12 students once again were successful in passing the Massachusetts 
Board of Cosmetology exam and are gainfully employed in salons. 



122 



Culinary Arts : Gerry's Place Restaurant and Bake Shop continue to offer 
lunch and baked goods to the public, Tuesdays through Fridays, when 
school is in session. Culinary Arts continues to be one of the more 
popular programs in the school. Many senior citizen groups enjoy lunch at 
Gerry's Place Restaurant during the school year. Students attended field 
trips at a variety of venues to learn about the diverse career opportunities 
in the food and hospitality industry. Students in the Culinary Arts 
Program received their certification in Serve Safe, OSHA, as well as 
meeting all standards set forth by the American Culinary Foundation. 

Dental Assisting: Students in Dental Assisting took the DANB Infection 
Control Exam and the Radiography Exam this past year as a requirement 
of the curriculum. The students in the Dental Assisting Program also 
volunteered to assist at the Community Health Day in Walpole. Students 
in grades 11 and 12 participated in a required clinical practicum at local 
dental offices. Grade 9 and grade 1 1 students participated in professional 
development seminars at the Yankee Dental Conference in Boston January 
2012. 

Early Childhood Careers : The Preschool Program and the Toddler 
Program were again fully enrolled, serving children from our sending 
towns. The students participated in a required field placement at local 
child care centers and public kindergarten classrooms to expand their 
experiences working with young children. Along with certifications in 
CPR, First Aid and OSHA, students in Early Childhood Careers achieved 
certificates for successful completion of the Strengthening Families 
workshop. Graduates of the Early Childhood Careers Program continue to 
pursue careers in the field of education by becoming gainfully employed 
in private centers immediately upon graduation or attending a four year 
college in order to teach in public schools. 

Electrical : Students in the Electrical Program are learning all aspects of 
both residential and industrial application. The grade 9 and grade 10 
Electrical students practice their skills in the vocational shop. Juniors and 
seniors in the program work on live projects in the Tri-County school 
building and in outside projects. Students in the Electrical program 
worked with the Carpentry students on a project to renovate a farmhouse 
on the Medway Community Farm this past school year. Students also 
gain valuable training in renewable and sustainable technology by 
practicing installation and monitoring energy conservation at the 
photovoltaic PV system which was constructed on the Tri-County 

123 



grounds. Students prepare for the State Journeyman license examination 
as they successfully complete both the theoretical and shop aspects of the 
program. Students will accrue up to 300 hours of Electrical Code 
instruction and 1,500 hours of practical application toward their license 
requirements upon graduation. 

Engineering Technology : The Engineering Technology Program now 
incorporates Digital Electronics, Principles of Engineering, Computer 
Integrated Machining, and Architectural Design into their curriculum. 
With Project Lead the Way Certification, the students are able to transfer 
their skills from Tri-County to many PLTW affiliated colleges upon 
graduation. The Engineering Robotics team, known as the Tri-Force 
Robotics Team, competed once again in the FIRST Robotics Competition 
held at Boston University, in the Beantown Blitz Competition, held at 
Northeastern University, and at the WPI Robotics Competition. The Tri- 
County engineering students were also chosen as one of only twenty four 
high school teams to design research for the International Space Station. 
The competition included a simulation and ground contest where the 
teams tested algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks 
relevant to future space missions. 

Facilities Management : Students in the Facilities Management Program 
gained skills in the many aspects of managing and maintaining a large 
industrial complex. They are required to take a CAD course in order to 
read and interpret blueprints, and perform important maintenance here at 
the school. They gained experience in renovating classrooms, replacing 
ceiling tiles, and performing landscaping projects on Tri-County school 
grounds. 

Graphic Communications : The Graphic Communications students 
continued to provide design and print services for Tri-County as well as 
for in-district municipalities. Projects included the Town of Wrentham 
letterhead stationery and the Medfield Public Schools school forms. The 
Graphic Communications students also created artwork for the Norfolk 
Historical Society. They continued to provide services to other non-profit 
organizations in the eleven town district. Design, pre-press, and printing 
skills are honed by students enrolled in this program. State of the art 
technology is used to enable students to be competitive as they pursue 
careers in this high demand industry. 



124 



HVAC&R : Students are trained in all aspects of heating, cooling and 
ventilation of both residential and commercial buildings. This past year, 
students in the program repaired refrigeration units in the Culinary Arts 
program and installed split system air conditioning units in the Tri-County 
school building. Students took the EPA 608 certification exam as an 
integral part of the curriculum this past school year. With this 
certification, graduates from the HVAC&R program will be well prepared 
for high paying employment and further education. Students who 
complete 2,000 hours as a refrigeration apprentice and achieve a trade 
certificate upon graduation may sit for the Refrigeration Technician's 
license exam. 

Medical Careers : Once again, all students in the Medical Careers program 
passed the Certified Nursing Assistant state examination at the end of their 
junior year. They also received Home Health Aide certification at the end 
of their senior year. Students also successfully completed the Pharmacy 
Technician on-line course during their senior year. The grade 10 students 
received Epi-pen training leading to a certificate. All students in the 
program were trained in medical office technology skills as well as basic 
healthcare knowledge. Tri-County continued to enjoy a partnership with 
HMEA (Horace Mann Educational Associates) this past year, which 
allowed the students to gain experience working with developmentally 
delayed young adults. Students also participated in a clinical practicum at 
local skilled nursing centers and hospitals. The students who graduate 
from this program have many career opportunities in the highly 
competitive health field. 

Metal Fabrication : The Metal Fabrication Program is in its second year. 
Students in grade 10 have received many AWS certifications, including 
GMAW-V, GMAW-O, GTAW-ST and GTAW-SS. Students will also 
learn the fundamentals of metal fabrication and joining processes. State of 
the art welding equipment allows students to become adept at oxy- 
acetylene, shielded metal arc, gas metal arc, flux core arc, and gas 
tungsten welding processes. Students are also being trained in the 
fundamentals of forming metals, and performing cutting operations. 

Plumbing : The Plumbing students practiced their skills in residential and 
commercial plumbing in the shop. Plumbing students also participated in 
outside projects in Medway this past school year. Tri-County continues to 
have an articulation agreement with the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Local 
Union 4 that allows our students the opportunity for advanced placement 

125 



in the apprenticeship training program. The Plumbing students in grade 1 1 
completed the Tier I Plumbing course and the seniors completed Tier II. 
Five graduates have already attained their apprentice licenses. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Department at Tri-County offers both day and 
evening courses. The day program includes two Post-secondary 
programs, Cosmetology and Practical Nursing. The entire evening 
program consists of additional Cosmetology and Nursing programs as well 
as sixty to seventy other course offerings. The majority of adults served 
are from within the school district; however, students represent cities and 
towns from all over Central and Eastern Massachusetts, as well as Rhode 
Island. Tri-County has offered access to Federal Financial Aid in the form 
of Pell Grants to qualifying students in our Practical Nursing and Adult 
Cosmetology programs for the past two years with about one-third of our 
students taking advantage of the PELL grants. This offering continues to 
improve community access to these programs through this need based 
support. 

Adult Day Cosmetology : There were fourteen graduates from the Adult 
Day Cosmetology program in 2012. Tri-County students once again were 
successful competing in SkillsUSA sending 2 students to the national 
competition. The Adult Day Cosmetology program is a full-time program 
that follows the high school calendar and runs from September to June. 
All phases of cosmetology are introduced the first half of the year. The 
student learns hairstyling, cutting, permanent waves, coloring, manicuring 
and skin care. This program provides students with the mandated 1,000 
hours of schooling and prepares them to pass the State Board of 
Cosmetology's licensing exam. Registration for the program begins in the 
spring and details are available by contacting the Continuing Education 
office at Tri-County. 

Evening Cosmetology : In June 2012, ten students from the Evening 
Cosmetology program participated in the postsecondary graduation 
exercises held on Friday evening June 22. The program's curriculum 
mirrors the day program in content but is spread out in more sessions due 
to the limited hours at night. This program also provides its students with 
the 1000 mandated hours and prepares the students to pass the licensing 
exam. This is still a one-year program that begins in September and runs 
until the end of June. Classes are held Monday thru Friday evenings from 
5:00 to 10:30 p.m. 

126 



Adult Day Practical Nursing : Graduating twenty-eight students in 2012 
the Practical Nursing program continues to flourish. The Nursing 
program also had a very successful year competing in SkillsUSA, sending 
several students to the national competition in Kansas City. This is a full- 
time day program which follows the high school calendar as classes are 
held from September through June. The Practical Nursing program at Tri- 
County is designed to prepare graduates for the National Council 
Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN), which tests for 
entry-level competency. Successful completion of this examination 
permits practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Registration for this 
program requires that prospective students take the TEAS (Test of 
Essential Academic Skills) exam. The pre-admission tests are 
administered from October to January. Details are available by contacting 
the Practical Nursing office at Tri-County. 

Adult Evening Practical Nursing : Tri-County 's Evening class is entering 
the second year of the two year program and expects to graduate as many 
as 15 students from the class in June of 2013. The evening Practical 
Nursing program is a part-time, two-year program that is held on 
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4:00-9:30 p.m. After successful 
completion of the course, the students are eligible to sit for the NCLEX- 
PN examination for licensure. Successful completion of this examination 
permits practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse. 

Evening Adult Program : The evening Adult Education program at Tri- 
County consists of approximately sixty to seventy courses which are 
offered in the fall and spring semesters. Registration for fall courses takes 
place during August and September. Registration for spring courses takes 
place in January and February. Continuing Education course information 
can be found in brochures available to the public via direct mail and local 
newspapers. The evening program information is also included on the Tri- 
County RVTHS website at http://www.tri-county.tc , or by calling the 
Continuing Education office. 

Student Activities 

National Honor Society : The Peter H. Rickard Chapter of Tri-County 
inducted 12 new members on October 26, 2011, raising the number of 
members to 24 for the 2011-2012 school year. These students 
participated in many fund-raising and community service activities during 
the 2011-2012 school year. Among these activities were campaigns for 



127 



Pennies for Patients and Cradles to Crayons. NHS members organized 
these drives, which the entire student body participated, raising money for 
the Leukemia Society and collecting school supplies for local 
disadvantaged children. 

On April 24, the National Honor Society hosted the annual "Leadership 
Breakfast" honoring Tri-County students who have served in various 
leadership roles, both elected and appointed during the school year. On 
May 30, NHS activities culminated with the organization and presentation 
of Tri-County' s twentieth Honors Night held in the Kenneth Custy 
Gymnasium. 

Student Government 

Student Advisory Committee : The student body elected seven students to 
membership on the Student Advisory Committee. The principal appointed 
one of these elected members to attend the monthly school committee 
meetings, where she reported on student concerns and activities. Students 
from this group also served on the Tri-County School Council. Three 
others served on the High Schools That Work Site Committee. These 
seven students also served as ex officio members of the Student Council. 
The student body elected two students to represent Tri-County on the 
Regional State Student Advisory Committee. These students met once a 
month at Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School with students 
from other schools in the Central Massachusetts region. One of these 
students was elected to the State Student Advisory Committee, which met 
once a month at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education in Maiden. 

Class Officers : The sophomore, junior and senior classes elected a 
President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer for their respective 
classes for the 201 1-2012 school year. The freshman class elected officers 
in January after their last exploratory. Under the supervision of the Class 
Advisors, officers scheduled, organized and conducted monthly after- 
school meetings to plan activities which included the Freshman class trip, 
Freshman/Sophomore Semi-Formal, the Junior/Senior Prom and the 
Senior Week activities. The class officers heard and communicated 
students' ideas to the Student Advisory Committee, and also served as ex- 
officio members of the Student Council. 

Student Council : Each class elected four representatives to the Student 
Council. These students, along with the class officers and Student 

128 



Advisory Committee members, served as the overall student governing 
body committed to the principle of student government. The group met 
weekly after school, and discussed issues and activities affecting the 
student body. The Student Council served as a liaison between the student 
body and the school administration and provided a means for student 
statement in school affairs. Under the supervision of the Student Council 
Advisors, this group was also accountable for conducting and ensuring fair 
elections for Class Officers, the Student Advisory Committee, and the at- 
large Student Council membership. The Student Council served as leaders 
for the student body, sponsoring and organizing social activities which 
included Freshman Orientation in August, followed by the Friday night 
activities for the September school Kick-Off Weekend. Student Council 
students assisted the Athletic Director in planning Homecoming in 
November and sponsored the many Spirit Week activities and the addition 
of the Tri-County vegetable garden. In addition, the Student Council 
planned and coordinated civic, social, fundraising, and community service 
activities, provided input to the administration on student handbook 
revisions and acknowledged administrators and teachers throughout the 
school year. 

Extra Curricular Activities 

There are nine extra-curricular activities at Tri-County. These clubs 
provided students with after school opportunities to explore and enjoy. 
Tri-County worked to provide a myriad of opportunities for all students 
during the extended week day and many weekends. The Drama Club 
performed "Afraid of the Dark", allowing students to showcase their 
acting talents; and the Music Club offered students who play instruments a 
chance to share their abilities. Additionally, the Math Club and Robotics 
Club participated in interscholastic competitions where students put both 
their academic and vocational experience to the test. 

Summary 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School is proud to 
provide a quality career education to the residents of its eleven member 
towns. Tri-County students are highly visible in our sending districts in a 
variety of roles. They serve as interns, summer employees, and 
cooperative education students and have completed a number of outside 
projects within our member communities. Each of these experiences 
assists our students in demonstrating what they have learned in their 
vocational programs. 



129 



Vocational training is only part of our success. Academic preparation is 
noted through the growing number of scholarships acquired from local 
associations and organizations, as well as the increased number of students 
now attending college upon graduation. Tri-County continues to prepare 
students as good citizens and this is witnessed through the actions of 
individual accomplishment of students through the mandated community 
service graduation requirement, as well as community service projects 
organized through a number of extra-curricular organizations. Two major 
school-wide projects this year were the annual Holiday Gift Drive and 
selling energy-efficient light bulbs. 

Tri-County is your town's vocational technical school. Our goal is to 
prepare our students to be good citizens who serve their community. 
Many of the programs offered at Tri-County are available to the public 
and service programs are open to residents. Our facilities continue to be 
available to town administrators for meeting use. 

Projects for member towns which were completed by Tri-County students 
included: Franklin, Carpentry students built a shed for the Franklin 
Community Gardens; Plumbing students completed plumbing for the 
Beaver Pond Bath House; Medway, Carpentry and Electrical students have 
been working on the rehabilitation of an old farmhouse for the Medway 
Community Farm. Norfolk, Computer Information Systems students 
designed a website for the town; Graphics students completed design work 
for Norfolk Historical Society. Sherborn, Carpentry students built a shed 
for Woodhaven Senior Housing and cabinets for the Fire Department. The 
Medway Farms project will continue in the fall as well as our Graphics 
Program providing printing services for several towns. 

Tri-County students also completed many projects located here at the 
school: Plumbing students replaced a backflow protector in the HVAC 
shop. Electrical students installed GFCI outlets in the Metal Fabrication 
shop and installed lighting in various areas of the school. Facilities 
Management students completed demolition in a vocational classroom - 
removed all built-in cabinets and ceiling tiles, installed new ceiling tiles 
and painted the walls. These students also installed a balance beam in the 
outdoor play area of the Early Childhood Careers program and installed 
shelving in Cosmetology. Construction Craft Laborer students repaired 
manholes on school premises and removed and replaced the sidewalk in 
front of school. Carpentry students built and installed shelving in the 



130 



newly renovated Medical Careers shop, business office and Dental 
Assisting shop storage area. 

Tri-County lives by its mission statement, specifically in the charge to 
prepare tomorrow's workforce; to provide a solid academic foundation for 
further education; and to prepare good citizens. Over the past year, this 
mission statement continued to move from words on a page, to action. 



131 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2012 



132 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The School Committee is extremely grateful for the outstanding staffs of 
administrators, teachers and support personnel who work in the district. Due to 
their hard work and dedication, the Medfield Public School System remains one 
of the top school districts in Massachusetts. 

Superintendent Maguire, we recognize that you have consistently provided 
outstanding leadership and have worked tirelessly with administrators and staff to 
deliver an excellent education at a low per pupil expenditure - an 
accomplishment that is admired by other school districts in Massachusetts. Last 
Fall, we sadly accepted your resignation for purposes of retirement and words 
cannot express the impact your departure will have on our district. We have 
come to regard you not only as an extremely successful superintendent that we 
trust and rely upon, but as a friend to the School Committee, parent groups, 
students and other Town departments. Your presence will be truly missed 
throughout the Medfield community. 

Simply stated, 2012 was a year of change and advancement. The operating 
budget, technology advancements and foreign language curriculum expansion 
were the focus of many discussions. We conducted and concluded a search for 
the Dale Street School Principal and welcomed Louise Snyder. At Wheelock, 
Donna Olson joined us as principal. We also interviewed and hired Future 
Management Systems to conduct a search for the position of Superintendent. 

Budget: 

Based on a revenue estimate from the Town Administrator, all Town 
Departments were requested to limit budgets to increases of no more than 1%. 
The School Committee presented a final budget of $27,398,849 to the Warrant 
Committee and town officials. The budget represented a 0.87% increase over 
last year and the Warrant Committee approved this recommendation without 
objection. 

It is important to note that Medfield is in the midst of a slight enrollment decline. 
Changes in the housing market and potential developments on West Street or the 
State Hospital property could dramatically and suddenly reverse this trend and 
cause a significant uptick in enrollment. The School Committee will keep up to 
date on these projects and will plan for it in future budgets. 



133 



Highlights: 

U.S. News and World Report, in collaboration with School Evaluation Services, 
(an affiliate of Standard and Poor's), awarded Medfield High School a Gold 
medal in its America's Best High Schools project, placing the school as #293 out 
of more than 22,000 high schools analyzed. 

(usnews.com/sections/education/high-schools) 

Medfield was awarded a three-year Confucius Classroom Grant by the New York 
based Asia Society. As one of sixty nationally-recognized programs to be so 
awarded, this grant will enable us to sustain and expand the Mandarin language 
program to the lower grades. Earlier in the year Ms. Hong Li, a teacher from our 
sister school in Bengbu China joined the High School teaching staff and helped 
develop the Mandarin program. In addition 8 Chinese students and 2 teachers 
came to Medfield for 3 weeks and attended classes and activities. This past Fall 
3 Chinese students came to Medfield for the school year to attend school. 

We made great advances in technology with the introduction of iPads in lieu of 
textbooks and as a teaching tool at Blake Middle School. A pilot was started 
with 80 students in the 8 th Grade Stars Cluster. Nat Vaughan, Principal 
spearheaded this project with a group of teachers, IT staff and the students and 
rolled out the program in a thoughtful and effective manner. The goal of the pilot 
was to test the use of a BYOD model that is sustainable in hopes of expanding 
the use of electronic personal devices in the classrooms. Teachers embraced the 
technology and have shared their new found expertise in Professional 
Development sessions with other teachers and staff. In addition to better student 
engagement and learning, the backpack weight load has been significantly 
decreased. 

The Medfield High School Jazz Band was chosen as a finalist for both the 
Charles Mingus Competition and the Essentially Ellington Jazz Competition. 
This is a very high honor that few high school jazz bands have accomplished. 

The Girls Varsity Lacrosse (Jason Heim, Head Coach) and Soccer (Michael 
LaFrancesca, Head Coach) teams won Division 2 State Championships. It was 
the first time a Medfield Girls Lacrosse team won the state championship and 
they were proud to bring one home for the history books. It was the second state 
championship win in three years for the Girls Soccer team. Both teams were 
given a heroes' welcome as our Police and Fire Departments met the buses at the 
town line and escorted them to the High School along with sirens and fanfare. 
We also saw the resignation of long time Athletic Director Jon Kirby and 
welcomed Eric Scott as the new Director. 



134 



The community continues to provide outstanding support to the district for which 
we are very grateful. From fulfilling teacher requests, to funding grants for 
teachers, to volunteering in classrooms and school events, this support plays an 
integral part in the success of our district. We also recognize the efforts and 
dedication of the Medfield Coalition for Public Education, the CSA's, the 
Boosters, The Medfield Foundation, the parents and students, all who make 
education a top priority and a community that makes Medfield a special place to 
live. 

In closing, I want to thank my colleagues on the School Committee - Tim 
Bonfatti, Vice Chairperson; Chris Morrison, Secretary; Maryanne Sullivan, 
Treasurer; and Eileen DeSisto, Member; Evan Berry and TJ Gianci, Student 
members. I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the many years of service 
and dedication by Susan Ruzzo who retired from the committee in 2012. Each 
member brings special talents and expertise to our committee which helps 
balance the workload and makes for great team work. They are dedicated, hard- 
working and committed to assuring Medfield' s school children receive an 
excellent education. It is truly a pleasure to work with this committee and to 
represent this wonderful school district and community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Debra M. Noschese 

Chairperson 

Medfield School Committee 



135 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2012 

Memorial School 

Kindergarten: 146 

Grade 1: 183 

Ralph Wheelock School 



Grade 2: 




186 


Grade 3: 


Dale Street School 


205 


Grade 4: 




199 


Grade 5: 




222 



Thomas A. Blake Middle School 

Grade 6: 225 

Grade 7 233 

Grade 8: 237 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 

Grade 9: 237 

Grade 10: 195 

Grade 11: 231 

Grade 12: 240 

TOTAL: 2739 



136 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Medfield Public Schools 
for the year 2012. 

The appropriated budget for FY2013 was $27,398,849. This figure 
represents an increase of 0.87% over the FY2012 appropriation. 

The October 1, 2012 enrollment was 2739 students. The enrollment by 
school was: Memorial School 329, Wheelock School 391, Dale Street 
School 421, Blake Middle School 695 and High School 903. 

During 2011 we continued to focus on the improvement of our use of 
educational technologies. At the Blake Middle School we initiated an Ipad 
pilot program. A group of 80 students taught by a team of middle school 
teachers were able to use these wireless devices in an experimental 
program. The teachers committed to a professional development training 
program as part of the pilot program. During the year we have been able to 
see the increase in organization of the students and the ease in which the 
devices can be used to engage the students in their study. As we are 
developing the FY2014 budget we will be exploring creative ways to 
sustainably fund expansion of this educational concept. 

We continue to find that students are progressing well academically based 
on performance data. The MCAS scores for our students continue to far 
exceed the average scores of communities in Massachusetts. The Boston 
Globe published a rating of schools based on the number of students who 
had been designated as advanced on their individual MCAS result. 
Medfield High School was the only school ranked in the top five 
communities in the Commonwealth in all three subject areas tested. 

On a personal note I reached the decision with my family to announce my 
resignation for the purpose of retirement from the position of 
superintendent of schools at the conclusion of the present school year. 
This was a very difficult decision for me after 22 years of employment in 
Medfield. During my time in Medfield I have had the opportunity to lead 
one of the most outstanding school systems in our nation. I have 
developed many meaningful relationships with public officials and 
members of the community that I will cherish for a lifetime. Despite many 

137 



issues and challenges I have appreciated the respectful nature of debates 
on issues that have occurred in Medfield. I have been truly blessed to have 
the opportunity to work in such a wonderful community. Over the past 
years there have been many important tasks which we have accomplished 
together. We have managed great enrollment growth and the resulting 
need for renovations and additions to three of our five school buildings. 
We have succeeded in providing our students with a world class education 
despite continual fiscal challenges including the worst financial conditions 
since the Great Depression. I am pleased that we have been able to 
maintain and grow our quality educational system over these many years 
due to your unwavering support. I am most proud of the outstanding 
teachers, administrators and support staff who I have had the experience of 
working alongside of during my tenure as a high school principal and 
superintendent. They have established a culture of high student 
expectations which has achieved outstanding results. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all of the citizens of 
Medfield for their strong support of our educational programs. I would 
also like to extend my appreciation to all of the teachers, parents, support 
staff, administrators, school committee members and volunteers who 
continue to actively support our educational mission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent of Schools 



138 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



Je * * * it 



Year Ending 12/31/12 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Maguire, Robert, BA,MEd 
Kellner, Charles,BA,MBA 
Leader, Kathleen 
Kelly, Francine 
Davidson, Sandra 
Montillo, Phyllis 
Kavanaugh, Mary 
Cave, Kim, BS 
Quinlan, Mary 
Sullivan, Colleen 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 

Payroll Administrator 
Director, Curriculum & Assessment 
Secretary, Director, Curriculum & Assessment 
Mail Transfer 



139 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



Name 


Position 


Parga, Robert 


Principal 


Sperling, Jeffrey 


Dean/Students 


Nunes, Kathleen 


Dean/ 
Academics 


Ingram, Maryjean 
Boyer, Laura 
Sleboda, Lisa 
Alden, Susan 


Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Chem. Teacher 


Alland, Emily 


Social Studies 


Ballou, Katherine 


Science 


Beardsley, Marianne 
Berry, Orla 
Blessington, Patricia 


Library Asst. 
Science 
Business 


Blum, Cynthia 


Science 


Broks, Ksenija 


English 


Brown, Philip 
Brown, Sarah 


Physics/Chem. 
English 


Bruemmer, Paul 


Foreign Lang. 


Burr, Wendy 
Cambridge, Jeff 


Mathematics 
Wellness 


Chamberlain, 
Madeline 
Cousens, James 


English 
Art 


Coutinho, Paul 


Wellness 


Cowell, Susan 
Coyle, Adam 


Consumer & 
Family 
Science 

Social Studies 



Education 

BA, California State University 
MEd, Azusa Pacific University 
CAGS, Salem State College 
BS, Bridgewater State College 
MA, Lesley University 
MEd, Endicott College 
BA, Framingham State College 
MA, Boston College 
MEdAdmin, UMass Boston 



MEd, UMass Boston 

BS, Bridgewater State College 

BA, Western New England College 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Stonehill College 

MEd, Boston College 

MEd, Endicott College 

BS,USG,MEd, UMass Boston 
BS, California State, Long Beach 
MS, MEd,Cambridge College 
AA, Hartford College 
BS, MAT, Simmons College 
BA, Smith College 
MAT, Simmons College 
BS, Univ. of Aberdeen, UK 
BA, Syracuse University 
MAT, Simmons College 
BA, St. Mary's Univ. of MN 
MA, Univ. of St. Thomas 
BS, UMass Amherst 
BS, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Endicott College 
BA, McGill University 
MAT, Tufts University 
BFA, UMass Dartmouth 
MEd, Fitchburg State College 
BS, So. Conn. State University 
MS, Northeastern University 
BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, George Washington Univ. 



Medfield 
Appointment 

2007 



2005 



2001 



1999 
2000 
2011 
2012 

2007 

2004 



2010 
2004 
1998 

2008 

2011 

2011 
2009 

2001 

2007 
2007 

2008 

2006 

2002 

1984 



2006 



140 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Curran, Jane 


Libr./TEC 

Asst. 




2004 


Drew, Meghan 


Art 


BA, Sacred Heart University 
MFA, Boston University 


2003 


Duffy, Gail 


English 


BA, Stonehill College 
MAT, Bridgewater State Coll. 
MSPC, Clark University 


2001 


Dunn, Jonathan 


Mathematics 


BA, James Madison University 


2004 


Emerson, Kathleen 


Social Studies 


BA, Providence College 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Farrahar, Anne 


English 


BA, MA, Boston College 


2010 


Flanagan, Jacqueline 


Mathematics 


BS, Boston University 
MS, Suffolk University 


1997 


Gait, Luanne 


Mathematics 


BA, Boston College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1999 


Garcia-Rangel, Mary 


English 


BA, UMass Boston 
MAT, Tufts University 


2000 


Goodrow-Trach, 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, SUNY/Binghamton 


2004 


Monique 




MST, SUNY/Plattsburgh 




Hamilton, Paula 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Framingham State College 
MA, University of Chicago 


2012 


Hardy, Adele 


Consumer & 
Family 
Science 


BS, Framingham State College 


1981 


Hughes, Brendan 


Mathematics 


BS, UMass Amherst 


2011 


Hutsick, Maria 


Wellness, 


BS, Ithaca College 


2007 




Athletic 


MS, Indiana University 






Trainer 






Irwin, Ross 


Mathematics 


BEd, Leeds University, UK 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Ivas, Nancy 


Wellness 


BS, Lesley University 


2012 


Jones, Katherine 


Art 


BFA, Mass. College of Art 
MEd, Framingham State College 


2003 


Karr, Bailey 


Science 


BA, Stonehill College 


2011 


Kincaid, Garland 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Colorado 
MST, SUNY/Potsdam 


2007 


Kinch, Terry 


Science Tech/ 
Computers 


BS, SUNY/Brockport 


1994 


Kraemer, Michael 


Mathematics 


BA, College of the Holy Cross 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 


1993 






MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


Letteiri, Colleen 


English 


BS, Assumption College 


2010 


Lohan, Melinda 


Social Studies 


BA, MA,UMass 


2006 


Lynch, Kerry 


Biology 


BA, Wellesley College 
MA, Emmanuel College 


2012 


Lyon, Diane 


Mathematics 


BS, UMass 


2006 



141 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Mandosa, Frank 


English 


BA, St. Anselm's College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2002 


McCrossan, Kathleen 


Library Asst. 




2005 


Morin, Donna 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, College of New Rochelle 


2003 


Morin, Thomas 


Social Studies 


BA, Colgate University 


2005 


Motley, Nancy 


Library Asst. 




2006 


Murphy, Kevin 


Social Studies 


BA, UMass Amherst 

MA, American University, DC 


2011 


Nothnagel, Margo 


Choral 


BA, Providence College 

MM, Westminster Choir College 


2010 


Noble, Judith 


Science 


BS, Univ. of New Hampshire 
MEd, Worcester State College 


1974 


Olsen, Douglas 


Dir. Of Music 


BA Music, UMass 
Masters, N.E. Conservatory 


1993 


Panciocco, John 


Soc. 


BS, University of Maine 


1998 




Studies/TV 


MEd, Cambridge College 




Penn, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Mt. Ida College 
MEd, Harvard Univeristy 


2001 


Pratt, Suzanne 


Science 


BS, UMass 

MS, Central Conn. State College 


1971 


Renaud, Karen 


Wellness 


BS, Rhode Island State College 
MEd, Fitchburg State College 


2008 


Rodenhi, Sarah 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Bowdoin College 
Masters, Middlebury College 


2000 


Sabra, Ann Marie 


English 


BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1995 


Safer, Jessica 


Mathematics 


BA, Assumption College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2002 


Salka, Martin 


Perm. Sub./ 
Lunchroom 

Asst. 




2002 


Sancher, Bethan 


English 


BA, Brigham Young University 


2007 


Sawtelle, Gwynne 


English 


BA, Dickinson College 
MAT, Simmons College 


2007 


Schmidt, Joanne 


Librarian 


BS, Framingham State College 
MLS, Simmons College 
MA, Emerson College 


2000 


Schultheis, Steve 


Science 


BA, Williams College 
MS, Long Island University 


2008 


Scott, Eric 


Athletic 


BS, Bridgewater State College 


2012 




Director 


Athletic Admin., Endicott Coll. 




Seri, Leora 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Bates College 
MA, Middleboro College 


2006 


Shapiro, Richard 


Science 


BS, Worcester Polytechnic Inst. 
MS, Northeastern University 


1981 


Shiff, Mary 


Art 


BFA, Mass. College of Art 


1996 


Sonnenberg, Neal 


Inst. Tech. 


BS, UMass Amherst 


2012 




Spec. 


MBA, Boston University 





142 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Tasi, Tracy 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Boston College 


2002 


Tevis-Finn, Julie 


Soc. Studies/ 


BA, Boston College 


2011 




Psychology 


MA, American University, DC 




Toubman, Ellen 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2002 


Walsh, Jeannie 


Library Asst. 




2008 


Wiese, Elizabeth 


English 


BA, University of Kentucky 
MAT, Boston University 


2006 


Woods, Jane 


Mathematics 


BA, MAT, Bridgewater State College 1996 


Woods, Thomas 


Soc. 
Studies/Art 


BA, Stonehill College 


2009 


Woodworm, Sharon 


Orchestra 


BME, University of Missouri 
MM, Boston University 


2010 


Wren-Burgess, 


English 


BA, Boston University 


2003 


Bonnie 




MAT, Simmons College 




Wu, Joyce 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Soochow University 


2012 



MA, Emerson College 



143 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Name 


Position 


Vaughn, Nathaniel 


Principal 


Campbell, Kelly 


Dean of Students 


McHugh, Elizabeth 
Skerry, Sharon 
O'Shaughnessy, Andrea 
Adams, Kathryn 
Batts, Maura 

Bradley, Laura 


Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Library Assistant 

Foreign 

Language 

Reading 


Boulos, Susan 
Bowles, Sean 


Foreign 

Language 

Science 


Buckham, Eileen 
Bycoff, Susan 


Foreign 

Language 

Mathematics 


Callahan, Sara 


English 


Caprio, Kathleen 


English 


Cincotta, Jeffrey 
Cole, Veronique 

Dalpe, Cynthia 

Delaney, Christina 


Wellness MS/HS 

Foreign 

Language 

Foreign 

Language 

Art 


Dengos, Kelly 
Dexter, Ryan 
Doolan, Constance 


Science 

Music/Band 

Mathematics 


Farrell, Kara 


Mathematics 


Gagne, Ian 


English 


Gantos, Alex 


Science 


Gavaghan, Brian 


English 



Education 

BA, Trinity 
MEd, Lesley College 
MOM, Endicott College 
BA, Narragansett College 
MA, Univ. at Buffalo, NY 



Medfieldl 
Appointment! 

1998 



2011 



BA, Middlebury College 
MEd, Univ. of MA 
BS, Bridgewater State 
MEd, Salem State College 
BS, Brown University 
MEd, Boston College 
BA, University of New Mexico 
MEd, Univ. of MA, Boston 
BA, MAT, Boston University 

BA, Stonehill College 

MAT, Briedgewater State 

College 

BA, Union College, NY 

MAT, Sacred Heart Univ., CT 

BS, MS, Southern Connecticut 

State University 

BS, Bridgewater State College 

BA, Univ. of MA, Amherst 

BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BFA, Massachusetts College of 
Art 

MEd, Lesley University 
BA, MA, Marist College 
BMus, Univ. of MA 
BS, Bradley University 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Univ. of MA 
BS, Boston University 
MFA, National University 
BFA, Tufts University 
MAT, Simmons College 
BA, St. Anselm College 



1998 
2001 
2006 
2008 
1993 

2007 

2001 

2011 

2006 

2011 



2011 

2007 

2011 
2004 

1986 

2005 

2005 
2000 
2004 

2010 

2000 

2006 

2007 



144 



Name 


Position 


Gibbs, Michael 


Science 


Gonzalez, Heather 


Foreign 




Language 


Gow, Michael 


Social Studies 


Gumas, Marissa 


Mathematics 


Haycock, Jonathan 


Librarian 


Heim, Jason 


Science 


Heim, Marjorie 


Science 


Hellerstein, Seth 


Social Studies 


Hurley, Eileen 


English 


Jalkut, Maryann 


Reading/Social 




Studies 


Kearney, Erin 


Mathematics 


Kirby, Ann 


Mathematics 


Kirby, Kristen 


English 


Malone, Elise 


English 


Manning, Deborah 


Social Studies 


Manning, Kristin 


Foreign 




Language 


McConnell, Ellen 


English 


McCulloch, Kathleen 


Wellness/Health 


McLaughlin, Nancy 


Mathematics 


Meaney, Donna 


Technology 




Assistant 


McClelland, Cynthia 


Social Studies 


Millard, Matthew 


Mathematics 


Moran, Jill 


Music 


Muscatell, Gina 


Science 


Nickerson, Mark 


Wellness/Health 


O'Corcora, Eoin 


Information 




Technology 




Administrator 


Perachi, Brenda 


Mathematics 


Porter-Fahey, Loretta 


Health Education 



Medfield 
Education Appointment 

BS, Worcester Polytechnic 2007 

Institute 

BA, Oberlin College 2004 

MA, Framingham State College 

BS, University of Wisconsin 2001 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

B A, Arcadia College 2001 

MEd, Lesley University 

MA, Ashland University 

BS, MEd, Boston University 1 998 

BS, SUNY, Albany 2002 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, MEd, Univ. of MA 2006 

B A, Beloit College 1999 

MA, University of Vermont 

CAS, Trinity College, VT 

BA, Simmons College 20 1 1 

BS, Framingham State College 1 987 

BS, Northeastern University 2007 

BA, MEd, Boston College 2003 

BA, James Madison University 2009 
MEd, Lesley University 

BS, Lesley College 2008 

BA, Hamilton College 2002 
MEd, Lesley University 

BA, University of Vermont 2003 
MAT, Quinnipiac College 

BA, Marymount College 1992 
MA, Northeastern University 

BA, Univ. of MA, Amherst 20 1 1 

BS, Valparaiso University 2009 

1993 

B A, Bridgewater State College 2010 

BS, Gordon College 2005 

BS, University of Connecticut 2007 

BS, Worcester State College 2007 

BA, Gettysburg College 1 995 
MEd, Framingham State College 

2008 



B A, Stonehill College 2012 

MSped, Lesley University 

BS, University of Maine 1980 

MS, Cambridge College 

MA, Simmons College 



145 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education Appointment 


Pratt, Sarah 


English 


BA, University of New 

Hampshire 

MA, Emerson College 


2012 


Russell, Ellen 


Technology 
Assistant 




2001 


Silva, Judith 


Science 


BA, University of Rhode Island 


2006 


Sperling, Keri 


Mathematics 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2000 


Spierdowis, Sandra 


Wellness/Health 


BS, Univ. of MA, Amherst 


2007 


Stephenson, Michelle 


Library Assistant 




2011 


Sullivan, John 


Social Studies 


BS, MA, Northeastern 
University 


2004 


Sullivan, Wendy 


Technology 
Assistant 




2002 


Taliaferro, Travis 


Social Studies 


BA, MEd, Plymouth State 
College 


2001 


Tasker, Geraldine 


Social Studies 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms 

College 

MEd, Lesley College 


1986 


Winter, Erin 


English 


BA, Framingham State College 


2007 


Zaia, Diane 


Science 


AS, Westbrook College 
BS, Northeastern University 
MS, University of Rhode Island 


1995 



146 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Snyder, Louise 


Principal 


BA, Southampton College 
MA, Stony Brook Univ., NY 


2012 


Moon, Martha 


Secretary 




1992 


Englehardt, Nancy 


Secretary 




1997 


Burnham, Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


BA, Univ. of Maine 
MAT, Simmons College 


1999 


Callahan, Christina 


Reading 


BA, Stonehill College 


2008 




Specialist 


MEd, Bridgewater State College 




Carey, Pauline 


Health 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Cowell, Kerry 


Grade 4 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


2002 


Crable, Heidi 


Grade 4 


BS, University of Maine 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1994 


Curran, Kathleen 


Grade 5 


BS, University of Mass/ Amherst 
MBA, Northeastern University 


2000 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


BSAE, Mass. College of Art 
MSAE, Mass. College of Art 


1993 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


BS, Stonehill College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Flynn, Suzanne 


Grade 4 


BA, Merrimack College 

MEd, Framingham State College 


2006 


Fromen, Deborah 


Technology 
Assist. 




2001 


Hayes, Margot 


Grade 4 


BA, Bridgewater State College 


2007 


Kristof, Ann 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 


1974 


LeBlanc, Sophilia 


Foreign 


BA, English 


2012 




Language 


College of New Rochelle, NY 




Lowerre, Julie 


Grade 5 


BS, Indiana State University 


2004 


Marchesi, Amanda 


Grade 4 


BS, MAT, Sacred Heart University 


2010 


Mason, Michael 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, Bridgewater State University 


1989 


Miller, Denise 


Grade 5 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Lesley University 


2008 


Nawrocki, Mairi 


Physical 


BS, Boston University 


2001 




Education 


MS, Bridgewater State College 




Nethercote, 


Grade 4 


BA, Rhode Island College 


2011 


AnneMarie 




MEd, Lesley University 




O'Brien, Terry 


Grade 5 


BA, National College of the Sacred Heart 1 984 






MEd, Northeastern University 








MEEdS, Simmons College 




Olson, Janice 


Grade 4 


BS, Boston State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
147 


1973 



Name 


Position 


Education 


O'Rourke, Jo Ann 


Lunchroom 
Assistant 




Oxholm, Barbara 


Music 


BM, University of Lowell 

MM, New England Conservatory 


Pastore, Marissa 


Grade 5 


BA, Emmanuel College 
MEd, Northeastern University 


Pendleton, Anne 


Reading 


MA, University of Southern Maine 
MEd, University of Lowell 


Rudnick, Barbara 


Lunchroom 
Asst. 




Sager, Bethany 


Grade 5 


BA, Mount Holyoke College 
Med, Framingham State College 


Scharlacken, Darla 


Librarian 


BA, Texas A & M University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 
MLS, University of Rhode Island 


Thornton, Maria 


Library 
Assistant 




Walunas, Kathy 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


White, Joseph 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, University of Massachusetts 


Woodman, Susan 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston University 



Medfield 
Appointment! 

2OO5I 



148 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 







] 


Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education Appointment 


Edward Quigley 


Interim Principal 


BA, Stonehill College 
MEd.,UMass Boston 
Doc. Boston College 


2011 


Naughton, Karen 


Secretary 




1985 


Monahan,Luann 


Secretary 




2002 


Appleyard,Cynthia 


Grade 2 


B A, University of Vermont 
MA,Lesley University 


2005 


Balardini,Stacey 


Grade 2 


BA, Providence College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2006 


Bassettjennifer 


Grade 2 


BA, Roger Williams University 
MEd, Framingham State College 


2007 


Callahan,Emily 


Grade 3 


BS, Plymouth State University 
MEd, Framingham State College 


2006 


Callahanjamee 


K-5 ELA/SS 
ConSpec 


BS, MEd, Framingham State 


2008 


Carey,Ann 


Grade 2 


BSEd, Framingham State College 


1971 


Donahue,Sarah 


Grade 3 


BA, UMass, Amherst 
MAT, Simmons College 


2010 


DiPesa,Leanne 


Grade 2 


BA University of New Hampshire 
MEd., Lesley University 


2011 


Duffyjean 


Reading 


BS, Boston College 

MEd, Rutgers University 

CAGS, Bridgewater State University 


2006 


Feig,Maureen 


Grade 2 


BA, Fairfield University 
MAT, Regis College 


2008 


Fine,Madeline 


Art 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MSAE, Mass College of Art & 
Design 


2001 


Frewald,Dorothy 


Technology 
Assistant 




1993 


Hevey, Sarah 


Grade 3 


BA, Merrimack College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2007 


Imbrogna,Ann 


Grade 2 


BS North Adams State University 
MA, Spec Ed., Bridgewater State 


2006 


Kuehl,James 


Grade 3 


BA, University of Arizona 
MA, Simmons College 


1997 


Laliberte,Kayla 


Grade 2 


BA, University of Amherst 
MEd Lesley University 


2011 


Landfield, Nance 


Mathematics 
Assistant 




2010 


Leonard, Joan 


Grade 2 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2002 



149 



Name 

Lynn, Rachel 


Position 

Grade 3 


McElhenny, Caren 
Murphy, Marcia 


Lib/Mathematics 
Assistant 
Grade 2 


Murphy, Sarah 


Grade 2 


Myers, Judith 


Reading 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3 


Nunziato, Grace 
Parmenter, Dorothy 


Lunchroom 

Assistant 

Music 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Slason, Michael 


Physical Ed. 


Steinhardt, Alana 


Librarian 


Stevens, Nicholas 


Physical Ed. 


Trikoulis, Deborah 


Grade 3 


Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 



Medfield 
Education Appointment 

BS, North Adams State College 1997 

MA, SpecEd, Framingham State 

College 

2006 

BS, Westfield State 

MEd, Framingham State 

BS, MS, Framingham State 

College 

BA, Clark University 

MS, Long Island University 

BA, MEd, University of 

New Hampshire 



BA, Marymount College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BSEd, Bridgewater State 
College MSEd, Wheelock 
College 

BA New Mexico Highlands 

University 

BS,Boston University College 

Of Communication, MLS, 

Simmons College 

BS, Springfield College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, MAT, Quinnipiac 

University 

BA, University of 

New Hampshire 

MEd, Lesley University 



150 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



Name 


Position 


Trasher, Andrea 


Principal 


Moores, Andrea 


Secretary 


Policella, Lynn 


Secretary 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


Cooney, Susan 


Reading 


Crowell, Deirdre 


Teacher 




Assistant 


Elrick, Stefanie 


Grade 1 


Gelinas, Ellen 


Wellness 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical 




Education 


Grace, Paula 


Grade 1 


Groden, Randie 


Librarian 


Guilbert, Alison 


Grade 1 


Hedberg, Heather 


Kindergarten 


Herring, Heather 


Grade 1 


Horvath, Diane 


Tech 




Integration 




Specialist 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher 




Assistant 


Kirk, Laura 


Teacher 




Assistant 


Knaus, Joseph 


Art Teacher 


Knott, Donna 


Library 




Assistant 


Maalouf, Raymonde 


Teacher 




Assistant 


Mahoney, Kelli 


Long Term 




Sub 




Kindergarten 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 



Medfield 
Education Appointment 

BS Bus Admin, Northeastern University 1994 

Med, Bridgewater State College 

Administrator Certification Northeastern 

University 

2011 
1998 

BS, Wheelock College 1991 

Med, Lesley University 

BA, Tufts University 200 1 

MBA, Simmons College 

MS, Wheelock 

2004 



BA, Assumption College 

MA, Simmons College 

BS, University of New Hampshire 

Med, Boston University 

BS, Keene State College 

MA, Cambridge College 

BS, Westfield State College 

Med, Lesley University 

BA, University of Maryland 

MLS, Rutgers University 

BS, University of Vermont 

Med, Lesley University 

BA, Boston College 

MA, Lesley University 

BA, Assumption College 

MA, Lesley University 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

Med, Lesley University 



BFA Massachusetts College of Art 



BS, MS, Framingham State College 



2003 
2011 
1992 
2007 
2001 
2001 
2001 

2012 
1999 

2012 
2009 

2011 

2011 

2000 



151 



Name 

McNiholas, Maura 

Mulock, Louise 
Nicholson, Margaret 
Nickerson, Jeninne 

O'Connor-Fischer 
Oppel, Heidi 
Paget, Christine 
Pendergast, Marie 

Pollock, Allison 
Ravinski, Kathleen 
Reardon, Suzanne 
Ruggiero, David 
Singer, Laura 
Teany, Meredith 



Position 

Teacher 
Assistant 
Teacher 
Assistant 
Grade 1 

Kindergarten 



Teacher 
Assistant 
Teacher 
Assistant 
Grade 1 

Grade 1 



Grade 1 

Grade 1 

Reading 

Assistant 

Music 

Reading 

Math Aide 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 

1998 



BA, Newton College of the Sacred Heart 

Med, Lesley University 

BS, Bridgewater State 

Sacred Heart 

Med, Northeastern University 

MEEdS, Simmons College 



BS, Framingham State College 

MEd, Lesley University 

BA, University of Massachusetts Boston 

Med, University of Massachusetts Boston 

MSpEd, Framingham State College 

BA, University of Vermont 

MEd, Lesley University 

BA, Wheaton College 

MEd, Lesley University 



BS, Bryant College 

MEd, Lesley University 

BS, Saint Bonaventure University 

MS, University of Bridgeport 



2000 
1978 
1998 

2003 
1998 
1990 
1998 

1992 
2001 
2002 
2002 
1990 
2012 



152 



PUPIL SERVICES 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education Appo 


intment 


LaCava, Matthew 


Director 


BA, Providence College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


2010 


Lowd, Diane 


Secretary 




1998 


Mitchell, Kim 


Secretary 




2000 


Birkett, Janet 


Secretary 




2000 


Avery, Deborah 


Secretary 




2011 


Alberts, Karen 


S & L Pathologist 


BS, Worcester State College 
MS, Boston University 


2012 


Allen, June 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Allen, Tracy 


Guidance 


BA, Vassar College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Armstrong, Kayla 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


Bennett, Linda 


Learning Specialist 


B A, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2007 


Bernard, Michele 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Berry, Andrea 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


Biedrzycki, 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Kathleen 








Birney, Edith 


Teacher, Special Ed 


BA, William Smith College 


2010 


Bockhorst, Kathleen 


Guidance 


BA, Bates College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Bonner, Chantel 


English Language 


BA, New Hampshire College 


2012 




Learner 


MS, New Hampshire College 




Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 


1998 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational 


BA, Oberlin College 


1994 




Therapist 


MA, Boston University 




Chlebda, Kanee 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Cohen, Barbara 


Learning Specialist 


AS, BS Fashion Institute of 
Technology 


2008 


Collins, Kate 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Connelly, Janet 


Nurse 


BSN, St. Anselm College 


2006 


Corey, Suzanne 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Crawford, Lisa 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


D'Amore, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


Dardia, Christine 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Boston College 
Med, Boston College 


2011 


DeGeorge, Sally 


Integrated Preschool 


BS, SUNY/Genesco 
MSEd, Boston College 


2004 



153 



Name 

Devine, Melissa 

Diamandis, Leslie 

Dolan, Gina 

Dondero, Jennifer 

Estes, Ashley 
Estes, Kimberly 
Farrell, Aimee 

Foley, Marie 



Frankel, Leslie 
Frazier, Kimberly 
Fuglestad, Joanne 
Giammarco, Nancy 

Gordon, Beverly 

Graham, Patricia 
Guglietta, Maureen 
Hagan, Samantha 
Hamilton, Susan 

Hauptman, Karen 
Heafitz, Michael 



Jacomme, Cori 



Position 

Behavior Therapist 

School Psychologist 

Out of District 

Coordinator 

Guidance 

Inclusion Facilitator 
Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 

Guidance 



Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Inclusion 
Coordinator 
Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 



Psychology 



Education 

BS, Emmanuel College 
MSEd, Simmons College 
BA Bates College 
Med & CAGS Umass Boston 
BE, Stonehill College 
Med, Wheelock College 
BS, Boston College 
MA, Boston College 
BA, Clemson University 



BA, Assumption College 

Med, Framingham State 

BS, Curry College 

Med, University of Massachusetts, 

Endicott College 

CAGS, University of 

Massachusetts Boston 



BA, Med, CAGS, University of 
Massachusetts Boston 
BA, Pottsdam State University 
MSEd, The College of St Rose 



BA, Colgate University 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Boston College 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 
BS, University of Washington 
MS, University of Rhode Island 



Medfield| 
Appointment 

2012 

2012 

2012 

2011 

2012 
2012 
2011 

2005 



2012 
2007 
1999 
2009 

1993 

2008 
1987 
2011 
2003 

2012 
2007 



2005 



Johnson, Janet 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


Johnson, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Northwestern University 
MEd, Boston University 
JD, Suffolk University 


2002 


Karg, Cynthia 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Kendall, John 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Kevorkian, Eric 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Krah, Kerrie 


Speech/Language 


BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 


2000 


Landry, Alison 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


Lassoff, Anna 


Inclusion 


BA, Clark University 


2010 




Coordinator 


MA, EdD, George Washington 
University 





154 







Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education Appointment 


Lodge, Anne 


Guidance 


BA, College of The Holy Cross 
MEd, Boston University 


2007 


Lowney, Tara 


Teacher Assistant 




2011 


Lucash, Seth 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


Mandosa, Heather 


Guidance 


BA, St. Anslem College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Marie, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




2012 


Marenghi, Matthew 


Guidance 


BA, University of Massachusetts 

Lowell 

MEd, Boston University 


2002 


Martlin, Jean 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


Mileszko, Diana 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


Moon, Evan 


Teacher Assistant 




2012 


Muir, Connie 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Mullen, Patricia 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Stonehill College 


2001 




Inclusion 


MEd, Framingham State College 






Coordinator 


CAGS, Bridgewater State College 




O'Donnell, Megan 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Ormbeg, Erik 


Guidance 


BS, Ithaca College 
MEd, Suffolk University 


1998 


0' Sullivan, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


0' Sullivan, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Providence College 

MA, Framingham State College 


2002 


Patch, Mary 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Wisconsin 


1995 


Preikszas, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Frostburg Sate College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1996 


Read, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Riccio, Julia 


Speech/Language 


BA, Bates College 

MS, Teachers College, Columbia 

University 


2000 


Rull, Renee 


Teacher Assistant 




2012 


Salamone, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
EdS, Simmons College 


1995 


Scheld, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




1997 


Schiemer, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Bridgeport 
MA, New York University 


2003 


Singer, Margaret 


Occupational 


BA, SUNY/Oneonta 


1998 




Therapist 


MA, Adelphi University 
MS, Boston University 




Snyder, Trinka 


Psychologist 


BA, MEd, University of 

Pennsylvania 

MBA, George Washington 

University 

CAGS, University of Massachusetts 


2002 



Speroni, Richard Teacher Assistant 



2000 



155 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education Appointment 


Strekalovsky, Elisabeth 


Psychologist 


BA, Middlebury College 
MEd, Lesley University 
MEd, CAGS, University of 
Massachusetts 


1998 


Sullivan, Barbara 


Learning 


BS, Framingham State College 


1995 




Specialist 


MEd, Boston State College 




Sullivan, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2012 


Thomas, Annie 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Thompson, Kathleen 


Nurse 


BS, Salem State College 
MS, Boston College 


1997 


Tilden, Susan 


Speech/Language 


BA, Boston College 

MA, Michigan State 


2005 


Triest, Sherry 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Typadis, Angela 


Integrated 


BA, Stonehill College 


1989 




Preschool 


MEd, Bridgewater State College 




Vancura, Dorothy 


Speech/Language 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MS, Southern Connecticut State 
College 


2007 


Villone, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


West, Nina 


Teacher Assistant 




2009 


Williams, Patricia 


Nurse 


BSN, Boston College 
MBA, Virginia Polytech 


2006 


Worthley, Stephanie 


Guidance 


BS, MEd, Springfield College 
MEd, Endicott College 


2006 


Zappula, MaryEllen 


Nurse 


BSN, Salve Regina University 


2005 


Zrike, Sara 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 



156 



FOOD SERVICES 



Mintzer, Richard 

Miller, Terry 

Anderson, Ruth 

Bickel, Catherine 

Brown, Angela 

Clark, Heather 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Evans, Sandra (Manager) 

Hart, Tina 

Heidke, Darlene 

Hill, Mary 

Hogan, Michelle 

Hoyt, Maria 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Lynch, Terry 

Lyons, Jaclyn 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 



Food Services Director 

Food Services Secretary 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Blake Middle School 

Memorial School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 



157 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Peterson, Alan 

Annese, Sandro 

Bond, Robert 

Bonfilio, Alfred 

Burke, Stephen 

Burton, Linda 

Butler, Shawn 

Frazier, Matthew 

Hayes, Ronald (Head Custodian) 

Heine, Scott 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Jackson, Michael 

Johnson, Michael (Head Custodian) 

Kadehjian, Robert (Head Custodian) 

Lawson, Charles 

Mulkern, Thomas 

Murphy, Brian 

Murray, Jeffrey 

Nicolazzo, Anthony 

Norian, Paul (Head Custodian) 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Vogel, Keith 



Plant Manager 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Blake Middle School 

Dale Street 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Central Office 

Memorial School 

Maintenance 

Dale Street School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Maintenance 

Memorial School 

High School 



158 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 



I am pleased to submit to you and the citizens of Medfield the 2012 Annual 
Report of the Director of Finance and Operations. Despite the continuing 
national and international financial problems from which we have not been 
immune, I remain confident that the fiscal and operational components of the 
Medfield Public Schools are well-positioned to continue to contribute to the 
ongoing excellence of the system. 

In the area of building maintenance, the School Committee and District 
Administration continued to address the capital improvement and maintenance 
needs of our facilities. Funds are budgeted and expended annually to continue 
the process of replacing flooring, classroom furniture and repainting interior 
spaces as needed. Amongst the projects completed in 2012 were corridor floor 
tile replacement and abatement and exterior door replacement at the Wheelock 
School, repairs to the language laboratory carrels at the Middle School, updating 
classroom electric power in a majority of the classrooms at the Wheelock School, 
restriping the outdoor track at the High School and updating intrusion alarm 
systems at all facilities. 

With cooperation from individuals throughout the District and utilizing the 
efforts and expertise of the Medfield Energy Committee and its members, we 
maintained our focus on energy usage in all of our facilities. We continue to 
experience success in mitigating the impact of the dramatic spike in energy cost. 
To quantify the results we have attained through our efforts, we enter our energy 
consumption data into an on-line tool made available through the U.S. 
Department of Energy each month. Amongst the statistics made available 
through this site, we are able to track our energy usage, adjusting for the impact 
of the local weather on this statistic. The Overall Adjusted Energy use in our 
schools is 24.2% less in 2012 as compared with 2008. This significant savings 
would not have been possible without the cost containment efforts we have 
focused on this area which have enabled us to reallocate scarce financial 
resources to areas more aligned with the mission of the School Department. 

The five-year capital budget is updated annually. This planning and management 
tool provides a systematic analysis of the capital needs of the system and its 
facilities. The capital plan attempts to provide a realistic assessment of our 
building and maintenance requirements within the context of fiscal realities. In 
the area of energy-related projects, we were able to obtain capital budget 
appropriations to complete the classroom window replacement project in the 
original section of the Dale Street School. In addition, we received funding to 

159 



replace the outdoor lighting at the parking lots, walkways and on the exterior of 
the facilities at the Memorial, Middle and High Schools, as well as to install 
automated boiler controls at the Wheelock School. Each of these projects was 
completed during 2012. In addition we were able to replace the original 
gymnasium floor at the Dale Street School, install blinds in the Middle School 
gymnasium and replace the side backboard systems in the High School 
gymnasium. Finally, the capital budget provided the necessary funding to enable 
us to initiate an archive project to ensure the integrity of school department 
records and update the district's records management area located in the 
basement of the Dale Street School. 

Our school lunch program continues to provide appropriate and healthy meals to 
our students. Director of Food Services Rich Mintzer continues to take the 
initiative in determining our customers' preferences in menu options while 
continuing to provide nutritionally-balanced meals. Rich remains actively 
involved with the District's Wellness Committee which was established to 
undertake a comprehensive examination of the nutritional quality of school 
meals, promotion of physical activity, nutrition education and staff wellness. We 
strive to continue to enhance our successful program while maintaining its 
financial viability. In an effort to improve our customer focus, we continue to 
plan for the implementation of a cashless payment system for our cafeterias. 
This project is expected to be brought to fruition in calendar year 2013 with 
funding provided within the 2013 budget. 

The budget process in 2012 culminated in the adoption of a FY 2013 budget for 
the Medfield Public Schools of $27,398,849. This represents an increase of 
$236,491 or 0.87% over the sum provided the previous year. The budget had 
increased by less than l A of 1 percent in two of the preceding three years, thus the 
total budget increase over the most recent four year period is an annualized 
1.19%. We were able to accomplish this by prudently managing the school 
department budgets of the prior fiscal years and through the School Committee's 
decision to minimize dramatic swings in funding availability by budgeting for 
one-time technology improvements in FY 2012 as personnel spending was offset 
by one-time EduJobs funding. 

In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my co-workers and 
staff for their continued exemplary assistance. I look forward with confidence to 
addressing the opportunities and meeting the challenges which lie ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles L. Kellner 

Director of Finance and Operations 



160 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of Medfield High School, it is my pleasure to submit this Annual 
Report for the calendar year ending December 31, 2012. The following 
paragraphs highlight the many accomplishments that took place at MHS 
over the past 12 months. 

The official enrollment at MHS on October 1, 2012 was 903. There were 226 
graduates in the Class of 2012. Ninety-five percent of this graduating class 
went on to college. These colleges included: 

• Columbia University 

• Cornell University 

• Georgetown University 

• Harvard University 

• McGill University 

• United States Air Force Academy 

• University of Pennsylvania 

• Vanderbilt University 

• Villanova University 

In addition, 89 members of the graduating class of 2012 were inducted into 
the National Honor Society. 

During our graduation ceremonies, three members of the senior class shared 
their thoughts and experiences as students in Medfield. Honor Essayist 
Anne Scotti spoke of the circularity of life. She stated that "success is a 
continuous journey, not a destination," and she told the audience that she 
was excited to think about her future and those of her classmates. Fellow 
Honor Essayist Evan Berry challenged his classmates to find their "purpose" 
in life. He also thanked the teachers of Medfield who have taught the 
students the importance of support and encouragement. Senior speaker 
Kelsey Sipple told her classmates that they are about to embark on a journey 
that will give them an opportunity to make an impact outside of Medfield. 
She encouraged her classmates to prepare to "climb mountains" and that 
there was nowhere to go but up. 

During our Class Day ceremonies, Phillip Burr, Class of 1947, was inducted 
into the Medfield High School Hall of Excellence. Mr. Burr is a decorated 
Korean War veteran and recipient of the Purple Heart and Navy Cross for 
heroic actions during that conflict. Mr. Burr is a devoted and active citizen of 
the Town of Medfield, was the founding member of the Home Committee, 
served on the Medfield School Committee and was a curator for the Medfield 
Historical Society. Also on class day, Medfield High School English teacher 

161 



AnneMarie Sabra was presented with the student- elected "Inspiration 
Award." 

In 2012, senior Kyle Andrulonis was a National Merit Scholarship recipient. 
Also, the following students were named National Merit Scholar 
Commended Students: Jared Barbaresi, John Bissell, Emma Comery, Joseph 
Festa, Mackenzie Garrity, Joseph Lanzilla, Jay Latimer, Eleanor Pope, Shelby 
Scola, Anne Scotti, Kelsey Sipple, and Kevin Wang. These students received a 
certificate of achievement from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 

This past year, 248 students took 395 AP exams in 16 subjects. Our SAT and 
ACT scores were well above the national average. The MHS MCAS results 
were once again exemplary: 

• ELA - 100% passing score (100% Advanced/Proficient). 

• Math - 100% passing score (98% Advanced/Proficient) 

• Science - 100% passing score (97% Advanced/Proficient) 

Last year, MHS Librarian Joanne Schmidt received the 2012 Goldin 
Foundation award. The Goldin Foundation is a non-profit organization 
dedicated to recognizing educators for their outstanding achievements and 
contributions in classrooms, schools, and communities. 

In 2012, we continued our partnership with our sister school in Bengbu, 
China. In November, 10 students and two teachers from the Bengbu Middle 
School spent 2 Y2 weeks living with host families in Medfield. The students 
attended school at MHS and the Blake Middle School during their stay. Also 
in November, Principal Robert Parga was invited to a conference in 
Shanghai, and also visited the schools in Bengbu during the trip. Finally, 
three seniors from the Bengbu #2 High School are spending their entire 12 th 
grade year as students at MHS. 



The following highlights many other departmental accomplishments: 

MHS submitted 40 student artworks to the Boston Globe Scholastic Art 
Awards. Two students, Abigail Michelson and Anne Scotti received Gold Key 
recognition signifying a high level of artistic technique & expression. Several 
MHS students also received recognition at the 25 th Annual Worcester Art 
Museum Allstate competition. Student artwork was displayed at the Artists 
Gallery at Patriot Place, the Medfield Garden Club, the Zullo Gallery in 
Medfield, the MHS Art Show, the Art Exhibit at the Medfield Public Library, 
and the MCPE Spring Fling. Two teachers, Meg Drew and Kate Jones 
exhibited their work at the Hunakai Studio's Art of the Educator Exhibit this 



162 



past October. The art curriculum was once again reviewed and one new 
course, Clay Art Studio was offered to students. 

The Boston Globe ranked MHS #1 in the state based on the percentage of 
Advanced/Proficient scores on the 2012 English MCAS. Also, ten English 
teachers were selected to present at the New England Association of English 
(NEATE) Conference. The workshops were titled, "Using Technology to 
Leverage Core Curriculum Skills" and "Generating Student Success Through 
MCAS Prep: A Team Approach." 

Once again, the MHS Math Team participated in the annual Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Math meet. MHS placed 11 th out of 87 teams, 
which marks the third highest placement in MHS' 17-year participation. 
Senior Greg Lyons was awarded a $1,000 WPI scholarship for his high score. 
From a curriculum standpoint, the math department offered one new 
course, Honors Statistics. 

MHS's award-winning music department once again received several 
prestigious awards. The Jazz Band was awarded "Top 15 in the Country" 
and was invited to perform at the Lincoln Center's (New York City) 
Essentially Ellington Festival hosted by Wynton Marsalis. The Jazz Band was 
also one of three groups nationwide to be a finalist in the Mingus High 
School Jazz Band competition. The MHS Concert Band performed at 
Symphony Hall and also received the Gold rating at the MICCA Festival. The 
MHS Flute Ensemble received the Gold rating at the MICCA Festival. In 
addition to a number of performances for the Medfield community, MHS 
music students hosted several clinics for younger students. 

In Science, MHS saw an increase in AP enrollment in 2012 and students 
scored well on the end of the year exams. The Boston Globe ranked MHS #3 
in the state based on the percentage of Advanced/Proficient scores on the 
2012 Science MCAS. Science teachers began incorporating more technology 
into their instruction, including new Biology software and the use of Apple 
TV's. 

On the subject of technology, the Social Studies Department continued it's 
excellent use of integrating technology into their daily instruction. Wireless 
laptop carts are used regularly for research, the Epson Brightlink projectors 
are used to present material and open source programs such as Animoto, 
Glogster, VoiceThread, Wikispaces, and Prezi, are used by students to share 
their work. Teachers Melinda Lohan and Julie Tevis-Finn introduced a new 
model for instruction, the flipped classroom. 



163 



The Wellness program at MHS continued to offer new activities for students. 
This past year, the first ballroom dance class held a showcase for family and 
friends and also welcomed performers from the WPI Ballroom Dance Team. 
Through an MCPE and PTO grant, many Wellness students participated in a 
simulation experience to demonstrate competency in the skills learned in 
their Personal Safety course. Also, over 100 sophomores became certified in 
CPR through an American Heart Association sponsored training. 

MHS continues to be committed to providing our students with real life 
experiences away from school and our World Language and Cultures 
Department has taken that lead. Last year, MHS sent 27 students to Madrid, 
Spain as part of the Spanish program. These students experienced life in 
Spain and had a great opportunity to develop their language skills in the 
context of the Spanish culture. Also, the MHS National Spanish and French 
Honor Societies continued to be active with over 100 new inductees this 
past year. 

Our success can be attributed to the continued support of the Medfield 
School Committee, and the Medfield community at large. We are grateful for 
the many resources made available to us and we will continue to work hard 
to provide our students with exciting and engaging learning experiences. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Parga 
Principal 



164 



Commencement 
Exercises of 

MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL 




The Amos Clark 

Kingsbury High School 

Class of 20 12 

Sunday, June 3, 2012 

2:00 P.M. 
Medfield High School 



165 



Medfield 
High 
School 



CLASS OF 2012 OFFICERS 

Warren Lent, President 

Christopher Fennell, Vice President 

Clare Crowell, Secretary 

Paige Peckham, Treasurer 

Andrew Velichansky, Representative to the School Committee 

Maura Batts 
Bethan Sancher 
Class Advisors 



ADMINISTRATION 

Robert C. Maguire, Superintendent 

Matthew J. LaCava, Director of Pupil Services 

Robert Parga, Principal 

Kathleen Nunes, Dean of Academics 

Jeffrey D. Sperling, Dean of Students 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Debra M. Noschese, Chairperson 

Timothy J. Bonfatti 

Eileen S. DeSisto 

Christopher M. Morrison 

Maryanne K. Sullivan 



166 



High ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^= 

school GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Medfield High School Band & Orchestra 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Abigail Michelson 

WELCOME Warren Lent 

President, Class of 2012 

OPENING REMARKS Robert C. Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYISTS Anne Scotti, Evan Berry 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2012 Christopher M. Morrison 

Medfield School Commitee 

SENIOR SPEAKER Kelsey Sipple 

MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL Robert Parga 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Paige Peckham 

Treasurer, Class of 2012 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Christopher M. Morrison Medfield School Committee 

Robert C. Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Robert Parga Principal 

Kathleen Nunes Dean of Academics 

RECESSIONAL Medfield High School Band & Orchestra 

*PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL 
GRADUATES HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS 



167 



^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ High 

AWARDS SchoGl 

PRESENTED AT SENIOR RECOGNITION NIGHT 
May 31, 2012 

Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award Evan Mayer 

National Merit Commended Scholars Jared Barbaresi, 

John Bissell, Emma Comery, Joseph Festa, Mackenzie Garrity, 

Joseph Lanzilla, Jay Latimer, Eleanor Pope, Shelby Scola, 

Anne Scotti, Kelsey Sipple, Kevin Wang 

National Merit Scholarship Recipient Kyle Andrulonis 

Academic Excellence Awards Courtney Beckwith, Evan Berry, 

John Bissell, Ashley Bryant, Emma Comery, Joseph Festa, 

Mackenzie Garrity, Natalie Gill, Felix Goldmann, Christine Grech, 

Gabrielle Jaques, Joseph Lanzilla, Jared Lichtenstein, Jack Moses, Shelby Scola, 

Anne Scotti, Kelsey Sipple, Austin Stahl, Samuel Tawa, 

Michelle Thomas, Megan Tschirch, Andrew Velichansky, Kevin Wang 

Stanley Z. Koplik Certificate of Mastery. . Jared Lichtenstein, Zachary Lichtenstein 

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

Medfield High School Scholar/Athlete Awards Evan Berry, Megan Tschirch 

Medfield Sportsmen Club's 

Harry S. Sonnenberg Scholarship Christopher Johanson 

Lamp of Learning Awards Jared Barbaresi, Courtney Beckwith, Austin Stahl 

National Honor Society Scholarships Clare Crowell, 

Joseph Festa, Mackenzie Garrity, Joseph Lanzilla, Jared Lichtenstein, 
Shelby Scola, Megan Tschirch, Andrew Velichansky 

National Honor Society Book Awards John Bissell, Christine Grech, 

Natalie Gill, Jack Moses, Anne Scotti 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Hannah Blanco, 

Kimberly Knowles, Eleanor Pope 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarships Gabrielle Jaques, Kevin Wang 

Margaret T. Jenkins Memorial Scholarship Emma Comery 

Medfield School Boosters Community Service Award Chelsea Robertson 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Scholarships Evan Berry, Paige Peckham 



168 



High ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^= 
School SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (Continued) 

Medfield School Boosters Excellence Award Megan Tschirch 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarships Matthew Shea, Samuel Tawa 

Medfield Youth Basketball Association 

Bob Porack Memorial Scholarship Robert Hunter 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship in Memory of Roger C. Rao. . . . Bradford Terry 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Brianna Cusanno, Jamie Weldon 

Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization Scholarships Amanda Amoruso, 

Hunter Doolity, Lauren Yancich 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Scholarship Conor Davis 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 1 10 Scholarship Melissa Newell 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Andrew Morahan, Aaron Thole 

Sons of the Legion Scholarships Phaedra Ghazi, Daniel Pucci 

Medfield Youth Baseball/Softball Scholarships Lucille Allen, Kristin Foster, 

Andrew Ludwig 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Scholarships Bridget Carey, 

Charlotte Chapin, Annette Curbow, Gabrielle Jaques, 
Ryan Maloney, Meghan McNeil, Rebecca Tauscher 

Daniel C. Palermo Spirit of Drama Scholarship Sean Lively 

David E. Medeiros Theatre Society Memorial Scholarship Christopher Fennell 

Medfield Soccer, Inc. Scholarships Joseph Festa, Samuel Horan, 

Sara Isaacson, Meghan Keleher 

Student Council Award Scholarships Chelsea Robertson, Robert Zappulla 

Student Council Unsung Leadership Awards IfeoluwaAdebayo,JeanetteBarone 

Medfield High School Community Teens Scholarships Kimberly Knowles, 

Megan Tschirch 

Friends of the Library Amy Fiske Creative Writing Scholarships Kelsey Sipple, 

Madeline Stephenson 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship Chris Landfield 

Medfield Music Association Scholarships Jennifer Orswell, Paul Wagenseller 

Lowell Mason Music Education Scholarship Nicholas Cruickshank 

Jeanne M. McCormick Music Award Grace Murray 

Music Pillar Award Andrea Murray 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Luke Rosenfeld 

Medfield Police Daniel McCarthy Memorial Scholarship Randy Krupnick 



169 



SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (Continued) 



Medfield 
High 
School 



Medfield Police Detective Robert E. Naughton 

Memorial Scholarship Elizabeth Driscoll 

Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation Scholarship David Landy 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Madeline Stephenson, 

Kabir Thatte 

Medfield Permanent Firefighters 

Association Scholarships Kimberly Knowles, Brian McCloud, 

Nicholas Murray, Mary O'Driscoll 

Medfield Firefighters Mutual Relief Association Scholarship James McMahon 

Eric Michael Perkins Football Scholarship Conor Davis 

Medfield Youth Hockey Doug Woodruff Scholarship Brian McCloud 

Peter Panciocco Youth Hockey Scholarship Caroline Sloan 

Don Brown Youth Hockey Scholarships Brian McCloud, Jamie Weldon 

The Thomas Award Jamie Weldon 

Larry Dunn Memorial Scholarship Chris Landfield 

David Gibbs Scholarship Andrew Callaghan 

Medfield High School Reunion Committee Scholarship, 

In Memory of Elaine Rawding Taylor. Kristin Foster 

Medfield Historical Society Scholarship Kabir Thatte 

Medfield High School Alumni Association Scholarships. . . Evan Berry, Megan Tschirch 

Medfield Youth Lacrosse Scholarships Conor Davis, Natalie Gill, 

Abigail McQuillan, Conor Roddy, Emily Zlevor 

Medfield Coalition for Public Education Scholarship Ashley Bryant 

Ken Brackett Memorial Basketball Scholarships Thomas Conlon, Robert Hunter 

Medfield Veterinary & Clinic Science Scholarships Lucille Allen, Kelsey Hern 

Peter Kenny Award Felix Goldmann 

Norfolk County Teachers Association -Future Educator Book Award Haley Yoke 

Nobscot Valley Softball Umpire Scholarship Lucille Allen 

Natasha Domeshek Kindness Scholarship Winners Chelsea Robertson, 

Joseph Shebertes 

Natasha Domeshek Kindness Scholarship Finalists Samuel Horan, 

Kimberly Knowles, Andrew Ludwig, 
Georgia Lundberg, Brian McCloud, Michelle Thomas 

Lowell Mason Foundation Scholarship Kabir Thatte 



170 



High ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^= 
School 

CLASS OF 2012 SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Sons of Italy Scholarship Jared Barbaresi 

University of Rhode Island University Scholarship Hannah Blanco 

Saint Anselm Fr. Daniel Dempski, O.S.B. Scholarship Amanda Borosavage 

Franklin Pierce Merit Scholarship Cameron Colella 

University of Vermont Out of State Trustees Grant & Scholarship Conor Davis 

American University Dean's Scholarship Alden Daybre 

Denison University Founders Scholarship Clare Dealy 

St. Lawrence University Presidential Achievement Award Christopher Diana 

Northeastern University Excellence Scholarship Connor GafTney 

Eric R. Cohn Education Foundation Scholarship Christine Grech 

St. Lawrence University Presidential Achievement Award Samuel Horan 

John Carroll University Arrupe Scholars Award Robert Hunter 

Stonehill College Moreau Honors 

and the Thomas & Mary Shields Scholarship Gabrielle Jaques 

MetLife Foundation Pathways Scholarship Gabrielle Jaques 

Suffolk University Academic Award Bernice Kinyanjui 

University of New Haven Distinguished Scholar Award Sean Lively 

Hamilton College Scholarship & the Siuda Scholarship Jack Moses 

University of South Carolina Sims Scholars Award Michael Mulrey 

University of Miami Trustee Scholarship and Miami Grant Douglas Nelson II 

Rochester Institute of Technology Presidential Scholarship Paige Peckham 

Medway Federation of Teachers Scholarship Jennifer Orswell 

University of Massachusetts Scholarship Austin Petrie 

Drew University Dean's Scholarship Valerie Savage 

Providence College St. Thomas Aquinas Scholarship Shelby Scola 

Simmons College Presidential Scholarship Courtney Swedeen 

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Mades Award Courtney Swedeen 

N.Y. Conservatory for Dramatic Arts Sanford Meisner 

Merit Award & Achievement and Academic Award Rebecca Tauscher 

Pace University Trustee Recognition Award Bradford Terry 

Southern New Hampshire University Go-Getter Grant Jessica Tsebetzis 

University of Delaware Scholar Scholarship Jamie Weldon 

George Washington University Alumni Scholarship & Grant Jesse Zapata 



171 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^— ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^— Medfield 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ High 

CLASS DAY AWARDS • PRESENTED ON JUNE 1, 2012 School 

ART: 

Excellence in Visual Arts Awards Abigail Michelson, Paige Peckham, Michelle Thomas 

Scholastic Art Awards Amanda Borosavage, Rachel Bozadjian, Ryan Maloney, Abigail McQuillan, 

Abigail Michelson, Paige Peckham, Kara Pelosi, Anne Scotti, Kelsey Sipple, Michelle Thomas 

Susan A. Parker Photography Award Annette Curbow 

Visual Legacy Award Courtney Beckwith, Ryan Maloney 

BUSINESS: 

Business Awards Alberico Musto, Austin Stahl 

ENGLISH: 

English Award Emma Comery 

Journalism Caroline Richard 

Yearbook Amanda Kane, Kimberly Knowles, Caroline Sloan 

AWS Award Evan Berry 

Creative Writing Awards Andrea Murray, Laura Petrucci 

Shakespeare Award Christopher Fennell 

Literary Magazine Emma Comery, Andrea Murray, Grace Murray, Shelby Scola, Michelle Thomas 

WORLD LANGUAGES AND CULTURES: 

French Felix Goldmann, Eleanor Pope, Kelsey Sipple 

Spanish Rachel Bozadjian 

National Latin Exam: 

Latin I, Magna Cum Laude Robert Hooke III 

Latin III, Summa Cum Laude-gold Jared Barbaresi, Samuel Tawa 

Latin IV, Maxima Cum Laude-silver Emma Comery 

Latin IV, Cum Laude. . Audrey Bigham, Natalie Gill, Meghan Norton, David Parsons, Rebecca Tauscher 
Excellence in Language Jared Barbaresi, Evan Berry 

MATHEMATICS: 

American Math Competition Robert Hooke III, Joseph Lanzilla, Kevin Wang 

Excellence in Math Felix Goldmann, Megan Tschirch, Kevin Wang 

New England Math League Robert Hooke III, Megan Tschirch, Kevin Wang 

MUSIC: 

John Philip Sousa Band Award Andrea Murray, Grace Murray, Paul Wagenseller 

Louis Armstrong Award Nicholas Cruickshank, Christopher Davis, Luke Rosenfeld 

National Choral Award Kelsey Hern, Gabrielle Jaques 

National Orchestra Award Ashley Bryant, Rebecca Tauscher 

SCIENCE: 

Biology. Rachel Bozadjian, Shelby Scola 

Chemistry. Shelby Scola, Austin Stahl 

Physics Robert Hooke III, Megan Tschirch 

Environmental Science Kelsey Hern 

Anatomy & Physiology. Olivia O'Connell, Kelsey Sipple 

Society of Women Engineers Christine Grech, Shelby Scola, Megan Tschrich 

SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award Jesse Zapata 

Gary Stockbridge Global Citizenship Award Robert Zappulla 

Richard DeSorgher Active Citizen Award Alden Daybre 

WELLNESS: 

Outstanding Participation Cameron Donnelly, Emily Zlevor 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT Evan Berry, Emma Comery, Clare Crowell, Annette Curbow, 

Christopher Fennell, Mackenzie Garrity, Natalie Gill, Joseph Lanzilla, Warren Lent, 
Ryan Maloney, Abigail McQuillan, Mary O'Driscoll, Paige Peckham, Chelsea Robertson, 

Kabir Thatte, Andrew Velichansky, Robert Zappulla 

8 



172 



Medfield 
High 
School 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2012 



IFEOLUWA BABATUNDE ADEBAYO 

LUCILLE BAISLEY ALLEN 
AMANDA CLARK AMORUSO 
KYLE SEBASTIAN ANDRULONIS 
ALEXA FAYE ANGELUS 
ALEXANDRA CHRISTINA ANTON 
JOHN FRANKLIN AVERILL, JR. 
CASSIDY DREW BAIRD 
JARED SCOTT BARBARESI 
JEANETTE PAULA MARY BARONE 
COURTNEY ELIZABETH BECKWITH 
GABRIELLA MARIE BERGONZI 
TIMOTHY EDWARD BERNARD 
KAILA ROSE BERNHARDT 
EVAN VALENTINE BERRY 
ALYSSA MARIE BETHONEY 
AUDREY BURACKER BIGHAM 
JOHN CUSHMAN BISSELL 
HANNAH ANN BLANCO 
AMANDA COULTER BOROSAVAGE 
RYAN CHARLES BOUDREAU 
CONNOR PATRICK BOWEN 
RACHEL VIRGINIA BOZADJIAN 
JESSICA ROSE BRAVERMAN 
MARY-MARGARET BROWN 
ASHLEY ANNE BRYANT 
JOHN MACMILLAN BUCHANAN 
ANDREW PETER CALLAGHAN 
RYAN MICHAEL CAPRIO 
BRIDGET CLARE CAREY 
KAYLA ANNE HOPE CAREY 
ALEXA LENA CARRIERI 
KERIANN CENTOLA 
JAMES VINCENT CERULLE 
CONOR ALAN CHAMBERS 
CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH CHAPIN 
COREY MICHAEL CHUNG 
LAURA BRENNAN CIANCIOLO 
HAYDEN MORSE COHEN 
CAMERON GENNARO COLELLA 
EMMA ELIZABETH COLLINS 
EMMA TABER COMERY 
THOMAS JAMES CONLON 
MEGHAN CHRISTINE CONNERS 
CAMERON NICHOLE CORRIGAN 
EMMA VETRI COTE 
WILLIAM GARRETT COUSINS 
CAROLINE ANN CRABTREE 
AARON DANIEL CRAM 
RYAN MATTHEWS CROMARTY 
CLARE ELIZABETH CROWELL 
NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER CRUICKSHANK 
ANDREW WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM 
ANNETTE EILEEN CURBOW 
CHRISTOPHER CAPRA DAVIS 
CONOR MILEY DAVIS 
ALDEN GIORDANI DAYBRE 
CLARE ELIZABETH DEALY 
NICOLE MARIE DEMELLO 
CHRISTOPHER JAMES DIANA 
CAMERON RONALD DONNELLY 



HUNTER MICHAEL DOOLITY 

* ELIZABETH AUDREY DRISCOLL 
DYLAN JOHN DUGAS 

JENNA ELISE ELLISON 
JAMES STANLEY ENSOR 
KARINA FRANCESCA ERICKSON 
CAROLINE NEWMAN ESTES 
NICHOLAS NORTON FEINBERG 
CHRISTOPHER JEFFREY FENNELL 
MICHAEL JAMES FERRIER 
+* JOSEPH ANTHONY FESTA 

CATHERINE ROSE CASIMERA FILIP 

* ANN GRACE FITZGERALD 
MACKENZIE ANNE FITZPATRICK 
KRISTIN MARIE FOSTER 

* CONNOR JOHN GAFFNEY 
+* MACKENZIE ANN GARRITY 

* PATRICK RYAN GERAGHTY 

* PHAEDRA CONSTANTINA GHAZI 
+* NATALIE REYNOLDS GILL 

* CALVIN JAMES GIVEN 

+* FELIX KONRAD GOLDMANN 
+* CHRISTINE MICHELLE GRECH 
EAMON THOMAS GRINNELL 
ABIGAIL DANIELLE GURSHA 
TYLER ANTHONY VASTA GUSTAFSON 
CONNOR JAMES HEANEY 

* KELSEY ELIZABETH HERN 

* ROBERT LOWE HOOKE III 

* SAMUEL THOMAS HORAN 
ROBERT PAUL HUNTER 
AMY RUTH HURWITZ 
CIERRA LYNNE IPPOLITI 

* SARA FRANCES ISAACSON 
+* GABRIELLEROSEJAQUES 

CHRISTOPHER EDWARD JOHANSON 

* AMANDA TAYLOR KANE 
FARZAAN KARIMI 
MEGHAN FRANCES KELEHER 
DYLAN MICHAEL KIEL 
BERNICE WABARI KINYANJUI 

* KIMBERLY ANN KNOWLES 
RANDY STEVEN KRUPNICK 
CHRIS ALAN LANDFIELD 

* DAVID KOSES LANDY 
GENEVIEVE CHRISTINA LANE 

* KELLY KATHERINE LANGE 
+* JOSEPH FRANCIS LANZILLA 

* JAY VINETTE LATIMER 
SANG HUN LEE 
WARREN ROBERT LENT 

+* JARED HARRIS LICHTENSTEIN 

* ZACHARY AARON LICHTENSTEIN 
SEAN CHRISTOPHER LIVELY 

* WALKER HEYL LOEFFLER 
ANDREW DANE LUDWIG 
GEORGIA GIFFORD LUNDBERG 
MICHAELA FINLAY LUTTMAN 

* ANDREW MARTIN LYDON 

* KEVIN TYLER LYNCH 

* RYAN PATRICK MALONEY 



173 



Medfield 
High 
School 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2012 



* LAURA ELISA MANDELL 

* NICHOLAS PRESTON MAO 
EVAN ROSS MAYER 

DANIEL STEPHEN MCANDREWS 
BRIAN PATRICK MCCLOUD 

* ERICA DRAKE MCLAUGHLIN 

* JAMES EDWARD MCMAHON 
MEGHAN ELIZABETH MCNEIL 

* ABIGAIL MARDEN MCQUILLAN 
CHLOE ELIZABETH MESSINA 
ABIGAIL STEWART MICHELSON 
JOHN HENRY MINER 

JACOB ALAN MINTZ 

LEANNE MEAGHAN MITCHELL 

ANDREW PATRICK MORAHAN 

* JACK JORDAN MOSES 

* MICHAEL LAWRENCE MULREY 
NICHOLAS RAMIREZ MULVOY 

* ANDREA KAY MURRAY 

* GRACE O'LEARY MURRAY 
NICHOLAS ROBERT MURRAY 
ALBERICO BENJAMIN MUSTO 
ALAY PARUL NANAVATI 

* DOUGLAS MICHAEL NELSON II 
MELISSA AMIE NEWELL 

JANE KATHERINE NISBET 
MACKENZIE CECILE NOONAN 

* MEGHAN ELIZABETH NORTON 
ALLISON MARIE OCKERBLOOM 

* OLIVIA MAUREEN O'CONNELL 
MARY ANNE O'DRISCOLL 
ALEX JOSEPH OPIELA 

* PATRICK JOHN O'REILLY 

* JENNIFER NICOLE ORSWELL 

* CAITRIA MARY PARSLOE 
DAVID THAYER PARSONS 

* PAIGE MAYBERRY PECKHAM 

* KARA MARIE PELOSI 
AUSTIN ROGER PETRIE 
LAURA EVERETT PETRUCCI 

* ELEANOR MARSH POPE 

* DANIEL ALEXANDER PUCCI 
MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER RAY 
JULIA ANNE REDDEN 
CAMPBELL JENNA REIFF 
CAROLINE MARIE RICHARD 
CLAY AUSTIN RICHARD 
CHELSEA TAYLOR ROBERTSON 
CONOR BENJAMIN RODDY 
GREGORY WYATT ROSE 

* LUKE ALAN ROSENFELD 
CAROLINE FRANCES RUSSELL 



RYAN DANIEL SAAD 
VALERIE PEARL SAVAGE 
HEIDI JOHANNA SCANLON 
SHELBY ECKEL SCOLA 
ANNE ELIZABETH SCOTTI 
MATTHEW ROBERT SHEA 
JOSEPH STEPHEN SHEBERTES 
CAROLYN ANNE SHEINGOLD 
KELSEY ELIZABETH SIPPLE 
KYLE WILLIAM SLACHTA 
CAROLINE ELIZABETH SLOAN 
JOSHUA JACOB SPENCER 
AUSTIN MICHAEL STAHL 
JOSEPH REECE STEEVER 
MADELINE HOPE STEPHENSON 
SAMANTHA CARROLL STURCHIO 
CHRISTINA ASHLEY SUN 
CORI ELIZABETH SUTTON 
DAVID PETER SWANSON 
COURTNEY LAUREN SWEDEEN 
MARK RYAN TAPLEY 
REBECCA SUMMER TAUSCHER 
SAMUEL NICHOLAS TAWA 
DEIRDRE MARYTEEHAN 
BRADFORD HENRY TERRY 
MATTHEW ANSELME TESTA 
KABIR PRABHU THATTE 
AARON PAUL THOLE 
MICHELLE BRIDGET THOMAS 
CLAUDIA MAEVE TISHLER 
SHANNON RAETOUHEY 
DANIEL JACOB TRIGG 
MEGAN MCCLOSKEYTSCHIRCH 
JESSICA MARIE TSEBETZIS 
THOMAS J. VALENTE 
NICHOLAS DANTE VARA 
ELIZABETH ROSE VARNER 
ANDREW JACOB VELICHANSKY 
MICHELLE JEAN VIEIRA 
ALEXANDER COMSTOCK VILLA 
LAUREN ASHLEY VOSS 
PAUL EMMETT WAGENSELLER 
KEVIN WANG 

JAMIE SAMANTHA WELDON 
BENJAMIN REITTER WILLIS 
RACHEL PAULINE WYMAN 
LAUREN ELAINE YANCICH 
FIALEY MARIE YOKE 
JESSE RUBIN ZAPATA 
ROBERT JOHN ZAPPULLA 
JULIA ASHLEY ZIMMER 
EMILY ANNE ZLEVOR 



MARSHALLS AARON COHEN, President & MATTHEW MURBY, Vice-President 

CLASS OF 2013 



'NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 



-RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 



10 



174 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CIRCA 1887 




AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 1961 - 2005 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
2005-Present 



175 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit 
this Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 2012. The following 
paragraphs highlight the many accomplishments that took place at Blake during 
the past year: 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHTS 

At Blake, our staff worked on developing engaging units of study to provide an 
enriching learning environment to both challenge and nurture our students. 
Curriculum was reviewed to ensure that the scope and sequence of the delivery 
of content was consistent and aligned, both vertically and horizontally. A focus 
area for all teachers, at Blake and across the district, has been the development of 
common assessments and establishment of common practices at both the 
department and grade levels. Technology has been both a school and district- 
wide goal for our staff at Blake. With the addition of two new technology 
integration specialists to our staff, we have been able to work to find meaningful 
and purposeful ways to enhance the learning experience for our students. 

A significant element of our recent work has been the exploration of a uniform, 
school-wide platform for the implementation of mobile devices in the 
classrooms. In many school districts, the iPad has become a preferred 
educational tool for a wide variety of reasons: flexibility, portability, and 
engagement, to name a few. Many possibilities exist for integration with Web 
2.0 tools such as slideshows, podcasts, whiteboards, videos, and e-books. The 
iPad's multi-media functionality provides the forum for students to interface with 
text, images, and videos, as well as the vehicle for teachers to differentiate their 
instruction for all learners while also utilizing cross-disciplinary tools for 
executive functioning support. This year at Blake Middle School, we have had 
the opportunity to explore the potential benefit of these devices by having the 
Stars cluster in 8th grade participate in a yearlong pilot program. The pilot study 
was implemented to allow our teachers and staff to thoughtfully implement and 
review the effectiveness of the iPads, while assessing their feasibility and impact 
on a smaller scale before any full-scale changes are put in place. The feedback 
we have gained from this pilot program has been a critical factor for both the 
school and district's future implementation and direction we will take with 
technology. Through classroom observations, professional development, 
informal and formal feedback from parents and students, and staff input, we have 
been pleased with the efficacy of the pilot and have determined that it is worth 
expanding the pilot for the 2013-2014 academic year. In an effort to expand 
upon our current iPad Pilot, we are working towards a 1 : 1 iPad initiative for the 
entire 8th grade for the upcoming academic year. 

176 



The alignment of the schedules at the secondary level has allowed an increased 
amount of communication and coordination amongst the administration, staff, 
and students. This alignment has been of particular benefit in our World 
Language department, as we look to expand our programming to the elementary 
level. 

Our English teachers in grades 6-8 have developed common unit tests including 
an open response question to help students gain writing skill practice. The 8 th 
grade English teaches revised and reworked the summer reading program for the 
8 th grade students, 7 th grade English teachers have been working on revising all 
quizzes and unit tests to create common assessments, and the 6 th grade English 
teachers led the R&D work on our MARS program to solidify a shared vision 
and goals for all students and teachers. Our mathematics department has been 
working to align the curriculum with the Common Core standards. With the new 
ELMO Document cameras in the math department, our instructional practices for 
providing demonstrations have been modified to make the visuals more 
accessible to the whole class. In an effort to meet the varying needs of our 
students, our Adapted Physical Education course for Blake students has provided 
a creative learning environment where students with special needs have their 
physical education goals met through a structured curriculum. This program has 
also allowed for increased social opportunities for students through the lunch 
group that follows this period. We have revised and updated our Building 
Curriculum Accommodation Plan (BCAP) and have established our Student 
Support Team (SST), a cross-section of staff with different expertise, grade level 
familiarity, and content backgrounds to provide support and strategies to help 
meet the needs of our students. 

Our partnership with the schools in Bengbu continued and expanded this year, as 
a cohort of eight students and three teachers visited Medfield from November 1- 
21. The students and teachers stayed with host families, attended classes at 
Blake and Medfield High School, and were able to see and experience many 
sights in the Boston area. The exchange was a positive experience for both 
schools and we are looking forward to the prospect of future exchanges in the 
coming year(s). In addition, we hosted a team of visiting administrators in June, 
sharing our programming at the middle school with government officials. Our 
Mandarin program has expanded along with the World Language program 
adjustments, with the development of programming at the elementary schools. 

Throughout the year, our staff provided opportunities to enhance the educational 
experience for our students, as we welcomed several speakers and presenters in 
2012. The Blake Summer Reading program culminated in September with 
grade-level presentations by former Blake and High School social studies 
teacher, Richard DeSorgher. Richard spoke of his student days at Medfield High 
in the late 1960's where a strict dress code was enforced - no blue jeans for 



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anyone and girls having to wear a dress or skirt at all times, even on cold winter 
days. Meanwhile, In Des Moines Iowa, three high school students had filed a 
lawsuit against their school for refusing to allow them to wear black armbands 
protesting the war in Viet Nam. The suit went all the way to the Supreme Court, 
who ruled in favor of the students. They were free to wear what they wanted to 
school as long as it didn't interfere with teaching. Richard then had all students 
in the audience who were wearing jeans or shorts stand up and said they could 
thank those Iowa students for enabling them to do so. Richard said that Hope, 
the protagonist of our summer reading book, Hope Was Here, performed a 
similar task by supporting the candidacy of her diner boss, G.T. Stoop against a 
corrupt incumbent. Despite being threatened, Hope rallied her friends to support 
G.T., eventually paving his way to victory. Richard stressed the importance of 
doing the right thing as opposed to the popular thing - especially when you risk 
being teased or perceived as not being "cool". A special thank you to Richard 
DeSorgher for his continuing service to the youth of Medfield! Our 8 th grade 
career day activities were highlighted by a keynote address by Michael Pratt, the 
Director of Content Marketing and Integration for the Lego Corporation. 

Our 6 th grade students were treated to Shakespeare Now's performance of A 
Midsummer Night 's Dream as part of the MARS curriculum, as well as a visit 
from the Boston Museum of Science's mobile unit. Other highlights included 
Grupo Fantasia and La Pinata, two performances hosted by our World Language 
and Cultures department. 

Our staff scheduled a number of off-site experiences to provide our students with 
opportunities to learn outside of the traditional classroom environment. Our 6 th 
grade students took their science learning outside of the classroom on a 
geological tour of Medfield. They also took a trip to the Peabody Essex Museum 
as part of their Social Studies curriculum. Our 7 th grade students spent a week at 
the Nature's Classroom facility in Silver Bay, New York and took their annual 
trip to the North Shore Theater in the Round to watch the Charles Dickens 
classic, A Christmas Carol. The 7 th grade also had a visit from an expert on 
Egyptian mummification. The 8 th grade Reading Workshop students took an 
annual field trip to the Memorial school to read to our younger students. Our 8 th 
grade students ventured down the Charles River as a culmination of their study of 
water samples, and they will be visiting the historical sites in Medfield on the 
annual bike tour this spring. In October, our 8 th graders visited historic Salem, 
Massachusetts, providing a historical perspective on The Crucible. The 8 th grade 
students also took part in the Russian Icon Museum field trip and a visit from the 
Higgins Armory. They ended their year with an engaging trip to Washington, 
D.C. 

We have continued our efforts to recognize students at the cluster level, for both 
academic and effort-based achievements. A goal as we look ahead is to examine 
our programming in an effort to assure that we are honoring and celebrating the 

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emerging adolescent. Some of our efforts in this regard include our drama 
productions, annual lip sync contest, student/staff volleyball tournament, 
student/staff basketball game, Greek Week, intramural programming, and our 
enhanced Advisory program. With the 2012 presidential election, our teachers 
worked closely with the AP U.S. Government and Politics teachers at Medfield 
High School to have students come teach our students about the electoral 
process. 

MCAS 

Our students continue to excel on the MCAS tests, scoring in the top 5% of all 
middle schools in the state. The following table includes scores for Blake 
compared to the state. These are the percentages of students in the 
Advanced/Proficient categories: 



Grade 


Blake EL A 


MAELA 


Blake 
Math 


MA Math 


Blake 
Sci/Tech 


MA Sci/Tech 


6 


92% 


66% 


85% 


60% 






7 


93% 


71% 


71% 


51% 






8 


95% 


81% 


73% 


52% 


68% 


43% 



As part of our continued effort to raise achievement for all students, we piloted a 
math intervention program this year for our 7 th and 8 th grade students who needed 
more support to attain mastery of the standards. This pilot was a success and we 
have now established this system of support as part of our programming at Blake. 

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 

We continue to be proud of the hard work and dedication to learning and 
community that our students demonstrate throughout the year. 6 th Grader Gideon 
Lung won Blake's Geography Bee competition and competed at the state level. 
Andrea Nevins, one of our eighth grade students, was selected as Medfield' s 
ambassador for Project 351, a statewide community service project that brings an 
eighth grader from all 351 cities and towns in the commonwealth together on one 
single day to perform a service project. This project celebrates and encourages 
students' civic leadership and commitment to others. Our 8 th grade students 
competed in the Mathematical Association of America Competition, and Colten 
Dilanni was our school winner. Jane Pan placed second, and Cameron Young, 
Lori Barney, and Christian Newton tied for third place. Our 8 th grade students 
also placed 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd in the Boston Society of Civil Engineers West Point 
Bridge Competition. 



In the arts, a selected group of student artists had their work displayed in a 
professional gallery setting, as part of the 17 th Annual Student-Faculty Art 
Exhibit at the Zullo Gallery. This exhibit is an event designed to give special 
attention to the artistic accomplishments of our students from all grades, within 

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the context of our K-12 Visual Arts curriculum. In January of 2012, the Blake 
Visual Arts submitted works by 7 th graders Emily O' Grady and Zak Tauscher to 
the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards. Their work was recognized as 
representing among the best in the state, with Zak receiving a Silver Key Award 
and receiving Honorable Mention for their Observational Self-Portrait drawings. 
Brigitte Cronin won this year's Lion's Club Peace Poster contest with her image 
on the theme, "Imagine Peace". 

In music, our students received recognition at the Music in the Parks competition, 
with both our 7 th and 8 th grade band, 7 th and 8 th grade Orchestra, and Jazz 
Ensemble placing first and winning Best Overall. At the same festival, our 7 th 
grade Chorus earned an excellent rating and first place, and our 8 th grade Chorus 
earned an excellent rating and second place. At the MAJE Junior Jazz Festival, 
our Jazz Ensemble earned a gold medal. Individual students also were 
recognized, as Ryan MacLean earned the Outstanding Soloist award at the Music 
in the Parks festival, and Rebecca Ju, Jack Bourdon, and Dana Cruickshank were 
accepted to Junior Districts. 



PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

During the 2012 year, the district funded in-house professional development 
'embedded days', used to develop, review, and assess various units of study. The 
construct of the middle school schedule fosters a professional learning 
environment for our teachers, as they meet on a weekly basis with their content 
partners to align the curriculum and address student needs. Regular department 
meetings and professional days provided our staff additional opportunities to 
share ideas, review student data, and develop curricula to best meet the needs of 
our students. Through district funds, a team of Blake teachers are involved in a 
yearlong course as part of a 'Technology Leadership Cohort - T21', in an effort 
to discover and introduce purposeful initiatives into our curriculum via the tools 
of technology. 

Our World Language and Cultures department sent representatives to the annual 
MAFLA conference, and a team of special educators attended an autism 
conference, led by Temple Grandin. Eight staff members attended the NEASCD 
conference in Boston, attending workshops on differentiated instruction and 
teacher evaluation. 

The Blake Physical Education department attended the AAHPERD convention in 
Boston and two of our staff members attended the MIAA Wellness Summit in 
October. Our PE staff has also expanded their knowledge base, attending Yoga 
Education training. 



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We continue to stay current in regards to addressing the social/emotional needs 
of our students, providing the necessary training for all staff on bullying and 
harassment. Professional development initiatives at Blake during the 2012 year 
have included: technology in-service, developing intrinsic motivation, ethics 
training, safety/lockdown procedures, discussions on diversity and acceptance, 
and a presentation from Christi Barney entitled 'Barriers and Bridges to 
Perseverance: Psychiatric Diagnosis in the School', with the primary focus on 
depression and anxiety. 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Blake's community service program, Students Involved in Public Service (SIPS), 
continued to make significant contributions to Medfield, under the leadership of 
Tracy Allen, Seth Hellerstein, and Mike Gow. The proceeds of our annual Lip 
Sync competition were distributed to charity, books were collected for the annual 
Blake Middle School Book Swap, and contributions were made to Pennies for 
Patients (Leukemia and Lymphoma Society). Our 7 th grade students continued 
the partnership with Cradles to Crayons, a non-profit organization that helps 
children in need. Our 8 th grade students delivered dinners to Tilden Village and 
ended the calendar year by volunteering time to help set up the city of Boston's 
'Christmas in the City' event before the holidays. As part of this initiative, our 
8 th graders sponsored a student- staff basketball game, raising the funds to buy 40 
gifts for families in need. 

As a community we took significant time the week before Veterans Day learning 
about, recognizing, and thanking veterans in student advisories. Students were 
reminded how we came to celebrate Veterans Day in the United States, and a 
particular focus was paid to the veterans of Vietnam, with the culminating 
activity involving the dedication and unveiling of a Vietnam Memorial plaque at 
Blake. These activities emphasized the importance of taking the time as a 
community to make connections - as a school, in smaller groups, as individuals, 
with students, and with the community outside of the walls of Blake. 

Our annual Coats for Kids drive collected 43 coats, and money was raised for the 
Ken Brackett scholarship through the student/staff softball game in the spring. 
Our 8 th grade students continued the annual tradition of the 'Turkey Bowl', a four 
on four football tournament to collect food for the Medfield Food Cupboard. 
Over 125 food items were donated. Other community-based initiatives included: 
collections for the Medway homeless shelter, donations for an orphanage in 
Ethiopia, snowflake project for the Newtown, CT schools, eyeglass and costume 
drive during Halloween, and students working on signs and participating in the 
Walk for Hunger. This year, under the direction and lead of Cynthia McClelland, 
our students participated in the MLK, Jr. Day of Service as they provided 
community service at Blake. 

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The 2012 calendar year at Blake Middle School was full of accomplishments, 
and we will continue to strive to provide the optimum learning experiences for all 
of our students. Looking ahead to 2013, we will build off of our successes and 
continue to strive to make progress towards our goals of educational technology, 
community, and the establishment and provisioning for equitable learning 
experiences for both students and staff. 

A shared community goal has been to engage students both in and out of the 
classroom and to provide a 'balanced' approach to education. In this vein, we 
have expanded our systems of support to foster connections and to nurture their 
growth: enhancing our intramural program, instituting a school newspaper - 
Medfield Chronicle, incorporating recess into our advisory program, examining 
our mission statement, examining student stress, and engaging the community in 
dialogue about our programs. We have enhanced our parent information 
outreach and dialogue, holding parent coffees to discuss Student Recognition, 
providing an Internet Safety Night in conjunction with the Norfolk County DA's 
office, and holding an MCAS Information session for parents. 
The town of Medfield is a student-centered educational environment and it is a 
true honor and pleasure to lead the Blake Middle School. I want to acknowledge 
the work that our entire staff has done to support the students and community of 
Medfield - their support and commitment to student achievement is 
commendable. I would also like to recognize and thank our Dean of Students, 
Kelly Campbell, who has worked tirelessly with the students and staff to enrich 
the learning environment here at Blake. Finally, the continued support of the 
Community School Association and Medfield Coalition for Public Education has 
helped to provide a nurturing and supportive school for our students. It is an 
honor and a privilege to serve the community of Medfield and I look forward to 
both the successes and challenges that lie ahead for us over the next 12 months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Nathaniel A. Vaughn 
Principal 



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REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Ralph Wheelock School, it is my pleasure to 
submit the Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 
2012. The following summary highlights many accomplishments 
that took place at Wheelock School during the past year. 

Enrollment 

The Ralph Wheelock School serves children in grades two and 
three. Wheelock's enrollment as of October 1, 2012 totaled 391 
students. The total was comprised of 186 second graders and 
205 third graders. There are nine grade 2 classrooms with a class 
size average of 21 students. There are ten grade 3 classrooms 
with a class average of 2 1 students per classroom. In addition, 
Wheelock School hosts two collaborative programs ACCEPT 
and TEC. 

Staffing and In-Service Training 

All Wheelock teachers are highly qualified and possess extensive 
experience in their chosen fields. 

Presently six teachers are participating in the T21 technology 
class and share their knowledge regularly with colleagues. 

While differentiating instruction for all learners has been a 
practice in Medfield for many years, teachers at Wheelock 
benefitted from a workshop in Differentiated Instruction in 
October, 2012. 

For a second year our literacy content specialist, Jamee Callahan, 
has offered a Struggling Readers course through Framingham 
State University. To date, seventeen Wheelock teachers have 
taken this most effective course. 

I would like to recognize grade 3 teachers, Erin Watson, for her 
leadership and initiative at Wheelock School. Mrs. Watson 
recently participated as a visiting member of a NEASC (New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges) Team in the fall. 



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Curriculum and Instructional Highlights 

Wheelock School offers a variety of programs designed to meet 
the needs of all learners. In addition to special education 
services, we offer reading and mathematics support programs 
and counseling services. 

To fulfill the goals of the School Improvement Plan, Wheelock 
implemented a new mathematics curriculum aligned with the 
Massachusetts Framework/Common Core Standards. MCAS 
data has been analyzed and results are used to inform instruction. 
Released MCAS assessment items have been embedded into 
classroom instruction. 

Additionally this year, Ralph Wheelock School qualified as a 
Title 1 school and has received funding to support a Title 1 
Mathematics Intervention Program. A Family Math Night was 
held on December 3 rd to inform parents about the program. 
Parents and students enjoyed this interactive event. 

A new report card, closely aligned with the Common Core 
Standards, was introduced this year at Memorial School and 
Wheelock School. This reporting system better reflects student 
learning and achievement. An Information Night was held in 
November to share the new format of the reporting system with 
parents. 

The literacy coordinator continues to oversee the implementation 
of reading curriculum maps which have been aligned to the 
Common Core Standards. The curriculum map for written 
language is being aligned with the Common Core Standards and 
the 6-Traits of Writing have been added to enhance the 
curriculum for grades 2 and 3. 

Time has been spent researching and designing an elementary 
world language program for grades 2 and 3 which proposes 
offering Mandarin and Spanish to students beginning the 2013- 
2014 school year. The implementation of this program fosters 
the creation of a language/ intervention block, which provides 
for language instruction twice per week for each classroom. The 
instructional block also will provide the opportunity for other 
academic interventions on alternate days to meet the needs of all 
learners. 



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Another initiative, which complements differentiated instruction 
and intervention blocks, is Response to Intervention. Wheelock 
School has begun to implement many components of this 
process which seeks to meet the needs of all students and to 
provide early intervening services to those in need. 

Students at Wheelock School benefit from learning social skills 
through the Open Circle Program and the Wheelock Good 
Character Program. Teachers have participated in Open Circle 
training at Wellesley College and work to implement this 
program in the regular classroom while supported by the 
principal, guidance counselor and school psychologist. 

Integrating technology has been a goal throughout Medfield 
Public Schools. Wheelock School has been proud to receive 
Medfield Coalition and Community School Association grants to 
support technology. As a result, additional laptops, projectors, 
and ELMO document cameras are present in classrooms and 
allow teachers to integrate technology into instruction on a daily 
basis. 

Two additional grants were realized through our Community 
School Association. One grant funded five new walkie-talkies 
and a second grant funded playground items for the children to 
use at recess. The Medfield Coalition and Wheelock CSA are 
tremendous supports to our school. 

Parent Involvement 

Our Community School Association provides numerous 
opportunities for parental involvement throughout the year. 
Special events include the Family Math Night, the Winter 
Carnival, and the Book Fair. The support for Rocky Woods and 
the CSA's generous funding of grant requests, field trips and 
culturally diverse presentations for our students support 
Wheelock in its goal of creating a warm, nurturing supportive 
environment in which learning can take place. We sincerely 
appreciate all of their dedication to Wheelock School. 

Community Service 

Ralph Wheelock School values its community connection with 
the Medfield. Wheelock supports many programs such as 
Pennies for Patients, Jump Rope for Heart, Juvenile Diabetes, 
Globe Santa, the Medfield Home Committee, and the Medfield 

185 



Food Pantry. Each month teachers donate funds on Casual Day 
Fridays and donations have been made to these organizations in 
2012. 

Future Trends 

The 2013-2014 school year brings the implementation of the 
world language program to Wheelock School. We will continue 
our work with Response to Intervention to meet the needs of all 
learners. We also hope to work toward common assessments in 
all content areas, as we continue to implement the Common Core 
Standards. 

The area of mathematics has taken center stage and we endeavor 
to refine best practices in mathematics as we proceed with our 
work next year. 

As we strive to maintain and improve facilities, we will continue 
to increase technology opportunities for our students and provide 
teachers with necessary training. 

We will continue our efforts to insure smooth transitions among 
the three elementary schools as we work together for the children 
of Medfield. 

The Town of Medfield is a child-centered environment. It has 
been my privilege to lead Ralph Wheelock School in my first 
year as its principal. I would like to recognize the talented staff 
for their hard work and dedication which has allowed for a 
seamless transition in leadership. I would like to acknowledge 
the Medfield School Committee, the CSA and the Medfield 
Coalition for their support of the Wheelock School, as we 
collaborate to insure a successful 21 st century learning 
experience for our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donna M. Olson 
Principal 



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REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 2012. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFFING 

The Memorial School services students in our integrated preschool, kindergarten 
and first grade programs. Memorial's enrollment as of October 1, 2012 totaled 
378 students. This total was comprised of 49 preschoolers enrolled in morning, 
afternoon and extended day session, 146 kindergartners who attend morning, 
afternoon or full day sessions, and 1 83 first grade students. There are currently 2 
preschool classrooms that provide several scheduling options based on student 
need. There are eight kindergarten classrooms comprised of seven half day 
sessions and one full day session. Average class size for kindergarten is between 
18 and 21. Memorial has nine first grade classrooms with an average class size 
of 20. 

We also welcome the TEC preschool to our building as of July 2012. There 
professional staff supports the needs of several children from neighboring 
communities. 

All our classroom teachers and specialists are highly qualified and have lengthy 
experience in working with young children. The ability to understand and work 
with a very young population has created a child friendly atmosphere that offers 
patience and warmth while providing the vital instruction for success in early 
math, literacy and social development. 

It is a pleasure to include in this report that our Music teacher, Dave Ruggiero 
was honored for Excellence in Music Education by the Society for General 
Music in Massachusetts. David instructs Memorial students in weekly general 
music classes. He also teaches stringed instruments at the Dale Street School. 
David has developed an after school program that has resulted in a marimba 
band. The band has played in school concerts and at fundraisers. Dave has also 
authored several books and presented at music educator conferences. 



INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS 

The Memorial School staff continually strives to expand their knowledge of 
instructional techniques and current best practices to provide excellence in 
learning for our students. To achieve this goal, teachers have participated in a 

187 



variety of training opportunities through district sponsored workshops that have 
focused on techniques of intervention in the regular education classroom. 
Professional development is the key to remaining current and effective in the 
classroom. Over the year, Memorial staff members have participated in a variety 
of professional development opportunities. All kindergarten and first grade 
teachers have received training on the integration of interactive white boards in 
the classroom. Memorial received generous funding from the Memorial School 
CSA and The Medfield Coalition for Public Education to purchase iRovers for 
each classroom. An iRover is a SMARTboard that is designed to be at the right 
level and angle for young children. The purchase of the SMARTboards includes 
a vast number of programs that can be used to enhance instruction in the 
classroom. 

Jamee Callahan, K-5 Literacy Coordinator, offered a second round of a graduate 
level course on reading intervention strategies. Many of our classroom teachers 
attended the class. This graduate level course is specifically designed to address 
techniques for improving results for struggling readers. The teachers involved in 
this course have quickly made improvements to their current practices and have 
seen results in students' fluency and reading engagement. 

Numerical literacy is vitally important to our students. The Memorial staff 
completed the work to align instructional goals with the new Common Core 
Standards in Math. By grade level, teams have updated pacing charts that 
include areas of instruction now required by the Common Core Standards. Grade 
level teams are currently engaged in enhancing or developing unit assessments. 
We also hired a paraprofessional to support math intervention. The addition of 
this position has been vitally helpful in improving the delivery of intervention to 
children identified as needing support. 

Our Preschool staff has developed a curriculum map based on the Common Core 
Standards in all areas. They have created a new progress report that reflects the 
expected learning outcomes for our youngest students. 

Although data and finely tuned curriculum are the operatives in professionals' 
minds, the Memorial teaching staff continues to offer developmentally 
appropriate lessons that grow our language and numerical literacy. Children grow 
to be joyful readers, problem solvers, inquisitive young scientists, and socially 
competent members of our school. An adult observing a classroom will see 
children learning letters and sounds through song, puzzles, pencil and paper, 
mystery boxes and small group instruction. Math class consists of paper pencil 
tasks that have been preceded by the use of manipulative blocks, measuring tools, 
and group brainstorming sessions. Writing Workshop provides children the 
opportunity to write about themselves which is often previewed by student to 
student interviewing or friendly conversation with writing partners. Our curious 



188 



youngsters engage in many hands-on science activities throughout the year that 
are supported by up to date reading and video materials from our library. 



Memorial School is committed to providing guidance and instruction on the 
importance of social competency, the importance of kindness, and building 
resiliency. Using the Open Circle curriculum as our primary guide, the Memorial 
staff continues to instruct using our social competency curriculum. Kindergarten 
teachers have a collection of mandatory read aloud and Open Circle lessons. 
First graders meet regularly for Open Circle discussions that range from 
respectful behavior to beginning problem solving techniques that require calm 
communication and support of adults. Our web site contains our policy and 
incident reporting forms to help parents understand the process used to assist 
children through a difficult time. In addition to the lessons taught in the 
classroom, we hold a monthly assembly called the Get Along Gathering. During 
this time, students sing songs that have been taught by our music teacher, Dave 
Ruggiero, about respect, kindness, cooperation, friendship, honesty and 
responsibility. They are treated to a short skit performed by Duck and Moose, 
(Randie Groden and Herb Grace). The skits are simple and humorous and help 
the children understand how friends problem solve. Each month, a first grade 
class creates an illustrated and narrated theme based slide show. These slide 
shows have been well received by parents who visit our web page. The CSA 
funded two performing arts events that also provided lessons in kindness and 
anti-bullying. 

Memorial School prides itself on designing and delivering curriculum that is 
developmentally appropriate for young children. Touching manipulative and 3-D 
objects, exploring through their senses, learning to handle and read printed 
materials are all modalities our students use and are highly valued teaching tools 
utilized by the staff. However, the presence of technology in our students' lives is 
undeniable. Even at their young ages, most are familiar with web sites that bring 
them visuals of places and things not seen in their own backyard. They play 
software games for fun and learning. Smart phones connect them to relatives and 
friends and help mom and dad find their way in strange places. Digital cameras 
and tiny video recorders capture and document events that can be reviewed and 
saved in seconds. Technology enhances and broadens their view and access to 
the world. 

The addition of interactive technology in the classroom has been a successful mix 
if developmentally appropriate practices and twenty first century skills. The 
iRovers support instruction in the classroom. Our students follow teacher 
direction to engage in learning through a touch screen viewed by the entire class. 
With supportive adult guidance, children navigate specific web sites that bring to 
life science, math and history lessons. Children have begun to see the 
organizational power of technology as they check in and keep their class calendar 

189 



and lunch orders current by pointing and dragging their names on the 
SMARTboard, 

With a grant funded by the MCPE, we purchased a building license for 
"Startwrite" software. "Startwrite allows easy access for teachers to create 
differentiated handwriting activities for students from preschool through grade 1 . 
In house training was provided to staff so that they could quickly utilize this tool. 



COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Memorial School is most fortunate to have the remarkable involvement of 
parents and community members in our building at all times. Volunteers assist in 
our library and classrooms. The Memorial Community School Association 
(CSA) has raised funds for our visiting performers and authors. They have 
purchased library and classroom books and unit materials. The volunteers work 
closely with the Memorial staff members to bring in authors, poets and 
performers who enhance our curriculum. 

Our Literacy Lab continues to be a vital part of our instruction. The operation of 
the lab is fully supported by volunteer parents who arrive daily and assist 
children while they learn using Lexia and SuperPhonics software. 

The students of Memorial School often benefit from the interest shown them by 
students in the upper grades. A group of math students from Blake Middle 
School created "Creatures" to teach math concepts. They arrived in first grade 
classrooms with posters and 3-D sculptures and presented to our eager students. 
Many of our first grade classrooms develop pen pal and reading buddy 
relationships with classes from Dale Street School. We are so appreciative of the 
interest the upper schools share in nurturing the learning of our youngsters. 

Memorial School was the recipient of a grant from Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. 
The grant funded twenty-six panels that were painted by members of the 
Medfield High School Art Club. Each panel has a letter of the alphabet and a 
corresponding picture of healthy food(s). These two by three foot panels are 
stimulating visuals that decorate the cafeteria reminding children of good 
nutritional choices. 

From the day a child begins his/her educational journey at Memorial School, the 
process of understanding how he/she fits as a member of a community begins. 
Our goal is to help our young students begin to develop an understanding of the 
world around them. In conjunction with our Social Competency program and 
Social Studies curriculum, several drives were held. The children participate in 
"Gifts for Kids," bring in food donations for the Medfield Food Cupboard, and 
collect gently used books for needy schools and libraries. 

190 



FUTURE TRENDS 

In this busy world, we notice that children are challenged by the many stimuli 
around them. We will explore methods for helping all children self-calm and 
manage stress in their daily lives. The ability to self-calm, develop self-respect 
and problem solving skills are all steps to avoiding difficulties with bullying. Our 
efforts in this area will continue. 

Investment in creating a broad and deep Rtl program will continue. In past years 
we have focused on literacy interventions. With many techniques and systems 
underway in that area of the curriculum, we will begin to focus on math skills. 
Components of this effort will be to further identify appropriate and effective 
methods of intervention, teacher training, and communication to families. 

We will continue to collaborate with the Wheelock and Dale Street staff to insure 
parity and continuity of math instruction and standards based assessment. The K- 
3 grades will finalize and release an improved progress report. 

As my seventh year as principal of the Memorial School progresses, I feel most 
fortunate to work with a highly qualified and motivated staff. The community of 
Medfield continues to uphold its commitment to the education of its children. 
The collaborative efforts of parents, teachers, support staff and community 
members are reflected in the successes of our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrea Trasher, Principal 



191 



Students 


Dec. 


1,2011 


ages 3-5 




33 


ages 6-17 




315 


ages 18-21 




10 

358 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department Report for the year ending 
December 31, 2012. 

Special Education: 

The student enrollment in the special education program has seen a decrease in 
students ages 3-5 and 6-17 and a slight increase in students ages 18-21. Overall 
student special education enrollment has decreased. 



Dec. 1,2012 

21 
309 
_H 
341 

Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated 
below: 

Special Education Figures Only Dec. 1, 2012 

Grades PreK-5 143 

Grades 6-8 83 

Grades 9-12 94 

Collaborative 6 

Private Day 1 5 

This year the Pupil Service Department focused on many areas of professional 
development as well as development of services to meet the needs of a diverse 
set of learners. The department continues to solidify the service delivery model to 
ensure that all students are receiving instruction that they need. This includes the 
addition of a full time Behavior Specialist to work with our students who have 
more challenges in the areas of social/emotional and behavioral functioning. 
The Behavior Specialist works will students in the district ranging from 
preschool through high school. Also, the focus on social thinking curriculum 
utilized by the School Psychologists and Speech and Language Pathologist 
further enhances instructions for these students. Assistive technology has also 
been a main focus area within the department and is aligned with the overall 
district move toward the utilization of technology during instruction. The 
department now has access to multiple book share organizations, allowing 
students to use their devices to access all of their reading materials and have it 

192 



read aloud to them. These services also provide note taking abilities and the 
ability interact with the books electronically and in a meaningful way. 

Preschool: 

The integrated preschool providers have 6 half-day early childhood sessions 
servicing 21 four year old and 24 three year old children. The preschool 
continues as a voting member of the Charles River Community Partnership 
Council and is accredited through NEAYC. 

School Health Services: 

Four full time and two half time nurses provide services to students in preschool 
through grade 12, including the TEC classroom housed at the Ralph Wheelock 
Elementary School. The role of the school nurse continues to expand as the 
student population faces a broad spectrum of complex health issues. The nurses 
provide: health assessments (including blood pressure, cardiac, peak flow, pulse 
oximetry, pulmonary and blood sugar monitoring), injury assessment and first 
aid, medication administration, field trip preparations, psychosocial support and 
referrals, as well as assist in maintaining a safe and healthy school environment. 
The school nurses continue to be key personnel in each building supporting the 
Wellness Policy, and are in the process of updating the policy, which was 
initially adopted by the School Committee in August 2006. 

The diverse role of the school nurse also includes: coordinating the care for 
children with special health care needs, writing and supporting individualized 
health care plans, participation at special education team meetings, conducting 
home visits as needed, monitoring state requirements including physical 
examination and immunization records, and providing education on health issues 
for students, staff, and parents 

The nurses continue to broaden their knowledge base and skills to maintain 
clinical licensure and keep updated on new clinical advancements. Over the 
course of the year, the nurses attended or were provided training in several 
relevant areas including several workshops on concussions to support a new 
concussion policy, which includes extensive return to academics and activities 
follow up, as well as training on a new web based nursing software program. The 
nurses are also represented on many committees and groups throughout the 
school system and community. Several of the nurses are involved with the 
Regional Lyme Disease Committee which recently instituted a program to help 
raise awareness concerning prevention strategies. 



193 



Guidance: 

The guidance program in the Medfield Public Schools works to meet the needs of 
all students and is based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for 
guidance. Children have access to a guidance counselor beginning in the second 
grade. This guidance counselor works part time in both the Wheelock School 
and the Dale Street School. Three full time guidance counselors work at the 
Blake Middle School. Medfield High School has three traditional guidance 
counselors who work with students through alphabetically divided caseloads. 
There is a caseload that is shared among the guidance content specialist and 
another guidance counselor in the guidance office. In addition to working as a 
traditional guidance counselor, this counselor works as an adjustment counselor. 
The guidance content specialist works to oversee the guidance programming for 
all students within the district. 

The Blake guidance department is a critical piece of the daily operations of the 
middle school. The goal of the office is to assist all students achieve academic 
success, healthy self-esteem, time management, sensitivity to the needs of others 
and the ability to cope with change. Each of the three guidance counselors 
teaches group guidance classes for students in grades six through eight, which is 
specific to the developmental needs of the students. Through the group guidance 
classes, individual counseling, and interactions with colleagues and parents, the 
counselor work to foster the personal growth of each student. 

The Medfield High School Guidance program focuses on the academic, social, 
and emotional well-being of each student. The counselors develop relationships 
with their students beginning with the transition from eighth grade through high 
school graduation. The office works collaboratively in their curriculum planning 
to ensure that all students receive the appropriate curriculum based on their 
developmental needs. 

A solid transition from the middle school to the high school can be critical in the 
success of each student. There are a number of activities that help to create this 
successful transition. The high school counselors meet with the eighth graders 
during their advisories to open their Naviance accounts. The web based accounts 
house the cumulative temporary guidance folder for students at the high school 
and are the vehicle for course recommendations and selection. The students meet 
by cluster with the guidance department to discuss course selection, participate in 
a transitional program in June, and begin their freshmen year with an orientation 
program. The guidance counselors meet with the students to discuss the 
transition, four year planning, goals setting, transcripts and making the most of 
high school. In addition, there is a check-in conducted at the mid-year point of 
freshmen year to ensure the connections that students have within the building. 
Within the sophomore curriculum there is time spent on career exploration, 
interest inventories, money management, resumes, and interviews. During a 

194 



student's junior year the focus becomes future planning for post-graduation. 
Senior year is individualized based on the specific post-secondary goals of the 
student. Additional topics for seniors include scholarships and the transition 
from high school. 

The guidance program is continually refining the services to students and 
families. Improved communication with parents, students, and teachers is a 
constant goal within the office. There is a standing Guidance Advisory that 
meets regularly at the high school level. It is comprised of parents, students and 
the guidance counselors and meets to discuss current concerns or issues within 
the office. The guidance office uses Edline, e-mails, newsletters, and the website 
to communicate effectively with parents and students. Parent coffees and 
evening programs are conducted for each of the four grades to support the 
guidance curriculum. 

Personnel: 

This year the department welcomed Gina Dalan, Out of District Coordinator, 
Melissa Devine, Behavior Specialist, Leslie Diamandis, School Psychologist and 
Karen Alberts, Speech and Language Pathologist. Each new member of the 
department brings a tremendous amount of experience and expertise in their 
chose area. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Matthew LaCava 



195 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield 
Public Schools for the year ending December 31, 2012. It is my pleasure to report 
that for the seventeenth year in a row over seventy-five percent of the student 
body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the integral part athletics 
play in our school and the education of our children. My goal will be to continue 
the tradition of sportsmanship, which has been our history here in Medfield. Fair 
play, competition, goal setting, teamwork, are just a few of the life lessons that 
athletics can teach. Athletics truly is the other half of education. We offer 25 
varsity interscholastic sports to our students. This year we won twelve Tri Valley 
Championships, and 78% of all our varsity contests. This has been a very special 
year for our athletic programs in that we finished in second place for the Earnest 
Dalton Award for overall athletic success. We are proud to announce that 
Medfield High School had the second highest winning percentage of all public 
schools in the state. Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three 
levels during the past year. The following is the entire athletic coaching staff by 
season: 





WINTER 




Basketball (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 
Freshman 


Herb Grace 
Mike Mason 
Al Necchi 
Evan Moon 


Basketball (Girls) 


Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 
Freshman 


Mark Nickerson 
Ellen Gelinas 
Paul Coutinho 
Jess Safer 


Ice Hockey (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 


Toby Carlow 
Tony lafolla 
Rob Lynch 


Ice Hockey (Girls) 


Varsity 

Assistant 

Assistant 


Molly Norton 
Melissa Belmonte 
Lauren Duran 


Indoor Track (Boys) 


Head 


Tom Woods 
Mairi Nawrocki 



196 



Indoor Track (Girls) 

Gymnastics 
Swimming 



Baseball 



Softball 

Tennis (Boys) 
Tennis (Girls) 
Track and Field (Boys) 

Track and Field (Girls) 

Volleyball (Boys) 
Lacrosse (Boys) 



Lacrosse (Girls) 



Head 


Melinda Lohan 
Nick Stevens 
Cindy Appleyard 


Head 


Michelle Hopping 


Head 
Assistant 


Sara Callahan 
Marjorie Heim 


SPRING 




Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 
Freshman 


Matt Marenghi 
Gary Stockbridge 
Mike Mason 
Jeff Cambridge 


Varsity 

Assistant 

JV 


Travis Taliaferro 
Suzanne Frasca 
Jeff Cincotta 


Head 
Assistant 


Vin Joseph 
Gerry Cushing 


Head 
Assistant 


Chris DuBose 
Kristen Kirby 


Varsity 


Tom Woods 
Kevin Murphy 
Mike Kraemer 


Varsity 


Melinda Lohan 
Nick Stevens 
Mairi Nawrocki 


Varsity 


Jack Hastings 


Varsity 
Varsity 
J.V. 
Freshman 


John Isaf 
Mike Douglas 
Will Whitingsley 
Brian Cahill 


Varsity 

Assistant 

Assistant 


Jason Heim 

Leora Seri 

Kathleen McCullough 



197 



FALL 



Golf 


Varsity 
J.V. " 


George Callahan 
Frank Oliverio 


Cross Country (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Mike Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 


Cross Country (Girls) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Diane Lyon 
Cindy Appleyard 


Field Hockey 


Varsity 
J.V. " 
Freshman 


Mike Mason 
Sue Pratt 
Heather Quadir 


Football 


Varsity 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 

J.V. 

Freshman 


Erik Ormberg 
Matt Marenghi 
Brian Gavaghan 
Todd Collins 

Kevin Gavaghan 

Mike Lane 


Soccer (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 
Freshman 


Jason Heim 
Travis Taliaferro 
Paul Coutinho 
Shawn Clebda 


Soccer (Girls) 


Varsity 
Assistant 
J.V. 
Freshman 


Michael LaFrancesca 
Melinda Lohan 
Kelly Dengos 
John Kendall 


Volleyball (Girls) 


Varsity 

J.V. 

Freshman 


Jack Hastings 
Amanda Altimar 
Caitlin Kirby 



Our 201 1-2012 winter seasons started and ended with the same tradition of 
success. Notable achievements should be recognized with the boys' ice hockey 
team winning the TVL Championship and Conor Roddy being elected the 
league's goalie of the year. Girls' ice hockey made the MIAA tournament and 
finished fourth place in the SEMGHL. The boys' and girls' indoor track teams 
had stand out performances by junior Taylor Worthy, who was voted League 
MVP and set three school records in the 1000m, mile, and SMR. Melinda Lohan 
won Coach of the Year for the winter season. Boys' and Girl's swimming placed 
second at the TVL Championship Meet ending another positive season. The 



198 



most notable performances came from the boys' and girls' basketball program. 
The girls qualified for the state tournament for the twenty-second time in a row 
and ended their season 22-2 as TVL Champions. The boys' team also qualified 
for tournament and placed third in the league. 

The spring season of 2012 left no doubt of the warriors' ability to dominate on 
the athletic fields. Senior, Joey Shebertes pitched a no hitter and the girls' 
softball team made their first appearance in the MIAA tournament since 2006. 
Girls' tennis won the TVL Title and won the South Sectional tournament. Boys' 
volleyball continued the growth of their program and finished over .500. The 
track program continued their success as top contenders for the league title, but 
fell short to Hopkinton and Norton. The most distinguished success of the spring 
season is no surprise attributed to our lacrosse teams. The boys' won the league 
title and went far in tournament while the girl's team placed second in the league, 
but won their first State Title in program history. The warriors ended the 201 1- 
2012 school year with a great loss, but an equivalent gain. The retirement of long 
time AD, Jon Kirby is a difficult way to end the year, but his highly qualified 
successor was named on August 1 st , Eric Scott, the former AD of Ashland High 
School. 

The fall of 2012 has been most impressive with another girls' state championship 
and many TVL titles. Almost all of our fall sports made tournament with the 
exception of football, but the football team improved their overall record to 4-7. 
They were led this fall with outstanding performances, superb leadership from 
the senior class, and a Thanksgiving victory over Dover Sherborn. It was no 
surprise that the girls' volleyball team went undefeated in the TVL and won 
another TVL title. Boys' and girls' cross country placed well in the league and 
had three runners advance to the state championship meet including Greg Lyons, 
Ashley Campisano, and Taylor Worthy. Girls' field hockey had an effective 
season as well as the boys' 16-2 golf team. Boys' and girls' soccer traveled 
together to the south sectional finals this year promoting a strong bond among the 
programs. The boys' team unfortunately lost, but the girls team won their third 
state championship and third straight TVL title. 

Team: Girl's Tennis 

Record : 16-2 

Team Awards : League Title, South Sectional Championships 
Team MVP : Lexi Nasraway 
Sportsmanship : Megan Tschirch 
All League : Lexi Nasraway, Gabi Bergonzi, Hunter Stahl, Michelle Donnelly 



199 



Team: Girls Lacrosse 

Record : 18-5 

Team Awards : State Champions 



Team: Girls Spring Track 

Record : 8-1 

Team Awards : Sportsmanship 

All League : Taylor Worthy, Kristina Gustafson, Kate Letai, Mekenzie Smith, 
Megan McCordic, Payton Ouimette, Melissa Newell, Kaela McKenzie, Sally 
Todd, Cassidy Baird, Chrissy Grech 

MVP : Taylor Worthy 



Team: Boys Spring Track 

Record : 7-2 

Team: Boys Baseball 

Record : 12-9 

All League : Will cousins, T.J. Valente, Brian McCloud, Joe Shebertes, Matt 
Casieri 



Team: Softball 

Record : 12-10 

Team Awards : First playoff appearance since 2006; lost in first round to #1 seed 
Abington, Sportsmanship 

All League : Jackie Flint, Danielle Vaclavik, Ali Lucchesi, Lucy Allen 

Team: Boys Volleyball 

Record : 9-8 

200 



MVP : John Averill 
Sportsmanship : Robbie Hooke 

Team: Girls Ice Hockey 

Record : 10-6-5 

MVP : Mimi Borkan 

Sportsmanship : Caroline Sloan 

All League : Mimi Borkan, Jeanette Barone, Allie Ockerbloom 

Team: Girls Winter Track 

Record : 6-2 

Team Award : Sportsmanship 
TVL Meet Award: Taylor Worthy 
Coach of the Year: Melinda Lohan 

Team: Girls & Boys Swimming 

Record: Boys- 5-6 Girls- 4-7 

MVP: Connor Davis, Jen Alban 

Sportsmanship: Katie Nickerson 

All League: Jen Alban, Natascha Borgstein, Kira stonkevitch, Katya Stonkevitch, 
Sarah Mahoney, Hlay Dolan, Alec Haley, Connor Haley, Connor Davis, Alex 
Carpino 



Team: Boys Winter track 

Record : 4-4 

201 



Team: Football 

Record: 4-7 

All-League: Ryan Spillane, Arthur D'Angelo, Jack Papadinoff, John Pendergast, 
and D J Holman 



Team: Boy's Cross Country: 

Record: 7-1 

All-League: Greg Lyons, Ian Robertson, and Sean Robertson (1 st Team TVL 
All-Stars) 



Team: Girl's Cross Country: 

Record: 5-3 

All-League: Taylor Worthy and Ashley Campisano (1 st Team TVL All-Stars) 

Second Place - TVL Sportsmanship Award 

Team: Boy's Soccer 

Record: 9-5-4 (Lost in Sectional Final of MIAA Tournament) 

All-League: Bikash Bandari (1 st Team TVL All-Star) 

Team: Girl's Soccer 

Record: 15-0-3 (Won State Championship) 

All-League: Katelyn Murray, Jen Narlee, and Ali Gold (1 st Team TVL All-Stars) 

Nicole Busa and Lauren Petit (2 nd Team TVL All-Star) 

Mimi Borkan (1 st Team All-Star, TVL MVP, Boston Herald and 
Globe All-Scholastic) 



202 



Team: Field Hockey 

Record: 8-6-4 (Lost in 1 st of Sectionals in MIAA Tournament) 
All-League: Tori Brown and Carrie Cook (1 st Team TVL All-Stars) 

Team: Girl's Volleyball 

Record: 16-3 (Lost in State Semi-final) 

All-League: Kristin Fechtelkotter, Anna Krah, and Mekenzie Smith (1 st Team 
TVL All-Stars) 

Georgia Zimmerman (2 nd Team TVL All-Star) 

Alex McDevitt (1 st Team TVL All-Star, TVL MVP, MA Coaches 
Div. 2 All-Star, and Boston Herald and Globe All-Scholastic) 



Team: Golf 

Record: 16-2 

All-League: Brett Thomas and Mike DiFiore (1 st Team TVL All-Stars) 

Dan Neidermire and John Monahan (TVL Honorable Mention) 



Most of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri- Valley League. This 
league consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover- Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Millis, Medway, Norton, and Westwood. Medfield is the third largest 
school in terms of enrollment. Our girls' hockey team competes in the South 
East Mass Girls Hockey League (SEMGHL). Boys' volleyball competes in the 
Western Alliance League, and our gymnastics team competes as an independent 
team as there are no leagues available to them. 

This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration and the 
community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eric A. Scott 

Director of Athletics 

203 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Community Education Program continued its tradition of offering a wide 
variety of classes designed to meet the needs of our students and adult learners. 
This year the scope of the adult education program grew significantly. The 
programs now offered in the community education program include: 

Teacher Wellness Programs 

These courses were designed to relieve stress and improve the mental and 
emotional health of our faculty. Trips were planned, professional golf instruction 
was offered, exercise classes including yoga, spinning, and Pilates was scheduled 
to meet the needs of our teachers and staff. 

Adult Education 

The brochure comes out twice a year and offers a diverse selection of courses 
looking to meet the needs of the Medfield Community. There are four major 
categories in our brochure. They include: career, financial planning, and exercise 
sports, and instructional courses. We hope to add more courses in the future. 

Intramurals 

The goal of the intramural program was to offer activities to all our children. The 
popular fun and fitness programs in the Memorial and Wheelock Schools were 
expanded. The programs in the Dale Street School and the Blake Middle School 
continued to thrive. The fitness center at the high school was well attended by 
students and faculty alike. 

A.M. Care Programs 

These programs were offered in the Memorial School, the Dale Street School, 
and Wheelock School. This program starts at 7:00 A.M. and is designed to assist 
working parents with their childcare. This is a low cost program where children 
can choose activities or do homework before school. 



204 



Summer Experience 

This program is directed by Kim Estes and is run out of the Memorial School 
during the summer months. This has been a very popular program with a diverse 
program of crafts, music and games. We offer half-day programs throughout the 
summer. 

Warrior Summer Camps 

The Warrior Athletic camps were another way for our youth to gain access to our 
facilities and our coaching staff. We offer summer experiences in baseball, 
soccer, basketball, field hockey and many more sports. We hope this program 
will continue to grow. 

We look forward to the future of the Community Education Program and what it 
can offer to the citizens of Medfield. 



Respectfully Yours, 

Eric A. Scott 

Director of Adult and Community Education 



205 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2012 



206 



MARRIAGES 



JANUARY 

1/23 Neresia S Watson 
Wilhems H Honore 

FEBRUARY 

2/25 Rebecca J Chechile 
Brenton A Hill 

MARCH 

3/3 Eric J Kerwin 

Anne R Giddings 

3/10 Duncan K Kay ondo 
Violet Nanyonjo 

3/16 Gary W Burchill 

Cristina D Pechiney 

APRIL 

4/2 1 Kristen M Greene 
Michael G DeVoe 

MAY 

5/20 Lauren M DeMinico 
Jonathan K Geary 

5/27 Saverio M Maviglia 
Julie A MacKay 

JUNE 

6/9 Christine M Martin 
Robert P Better 

6/9 John H Lynch III 

Kathryn E McLaughlin 

6/ 1 6 Lorrie L Manganello 
John P Guindon 



6/23 Alicia Taylor 

Ross A Scanlon 

JULY 

7/14 Christy L Pallis 
Clifford J Taylor 

7/20 Julie M Cook 

David A Schulman 

7/2 1 Jaclyn L Negoshian 
Andrew S Corrigan 

7/30 Dora C Uribe 

Peter F Augustini 

7/30 Jonathan D Rechner 
Anh Ngoc Huynh 

AUGUST 

8/4 Allison A White 
Guy Mark Tlapa 

8/1 1 Caroline P Wiznitzer 
Alan C Necchi 

8/18 OdezaS Papas 

William J Galvin 

8/18 Kristen E Maalouf 
Eric S Lipschutz 

SEPTEMBER 

9/22 Alexander Sakash 
Lacey M Robinson 

9/22 Michelle L Bento 

Albert J Manganello III 



207 



9/22 Michael T Flanigan 
Elizabeth E Scola 

9/22 Matthew C Hammer 
Jessica L Grant 

9/29 Paul M Hostovsky 
Marlene V Keddy 

OCTOBER 

10/6 Elizabeth H Gryska 
Michael J Rice 

10/12 Michele M Lomax 
Sandy M Kessloff 

DECEMBER 

1 2/27 Christopher R Ingram 
Amy Rae Cathey 



208 



DEATHS 








JANUARY 






1/8 


Jane T Stefaney 




JULY 


1/10 


Sherry L Savilonis 


7/3 


George Mykulak 


1/11 


David P McMahon 


7/12 


Harry T Mitchell, Jr 


1/14 


Mildred F Hominsky 


7/12 


Rita C Sakalinski 


1/15 


Anna R Clancy 


7/15 


Aurora D Melzar 


1/16 


Melvin J Procaccini 


7/18 


John D Coady 


1/21 


Genevieve M Friswell 


7/23 


Helen M Horton 


1/25 


Stella Piechota 


7/24 


James J Kilcoyne 


1/30 


Doris S Abriel 




AUGUST 




FEBRUARY 


8/6 


Mary A Cavanaugh 


2/27 


John T McLean 


8/11 


Gladys W Simcock 


2/28 


Donna W Vernon 


8/24 


Eugene W Lovell 




MARCH 




SEPTEMBER 


3/12 


Peter J Shiels 


9/22 


Josephine Pugliese 


3/18 


Manol Dhimitri 


9/23 


Joseph N Baker, Jr 


3/24 


Ann C Connors 


9/29 


Richard B Matty 


3/27 


Maureen M Madden 






3/28 


Virginia S Hall 




OCTOBER 


3/29 


Vincent A Palumbo 


10/22 


Alfonse J Caruso 






10/30 


Charles A Felice 




APRIL 


10/31 


Mark D Hesnan 


4/4 


Catherine M McAteer 






4/21 


Laurice M Pagliaro 




NOVEMBER 


4/21 


Edward W Christopher, Jr 


11/2 


Lawrence K Landy 


4/27 


Eunice R Sanwald 


11/3 


Kathleen Jones 






11/6 


Nancy Kashalena 




MAY 


11/10 


Serge Grandoni 


5/7 


Brian S Davis 


11/24 


Dorothy J Sweetman 


5/11 


Roger Hardy 


11/26 


Paul G Foucre 


5/13 


William J Kelly, Jr 


11/28 


Helen P Maloney 


5/14 


Paul M Halloran 






5/19 


Sally A Harris 




DECEMBER 


5/23 


Cleo B Repetti 


12/6 


Charles S Grover 


5/27 


Bernice M Mullen 


12/6 


Edward Flannery 






12/10 


Peyton C March 




JUNE 


12/12 


Ethel M Vaughan 


6/13 


Joseph H Plumb, Jr 


12/19 


George H Gifford, Jr 


6/14 


Angelina M Cusano 






6/15 


Ruth Sassone 






6/26 


Victor Barone 







209 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

MARCH 6, 2012 

Norfolk, SS 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 at the CENTER OF MEDFIELD 
on Ice House Rd, TUESDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF MARCH, 2012 
from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of 
political parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN BRISTOL & NORFOLK 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN BRISTOL & NORFOLK 

WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE. . . MEDFIELD 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given 
unto our hands this 17th day of January in the year Two Thousand 
Twelve. 



Osier Peterson . S/ 
Ann Thompson, S/ 
Mark Fisher, S/ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five 
public places seven days before the date of the meeting as within directed. 

210 



Constable: Larz Anderson 
Date: January 19,2012 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
Town Clerk 



211 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

MARCH 6, 2012 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes 
were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, 
voting precincts listing displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

ELECTION OFFICERS: Al Allegretto, Peggy Caruso, Ruth Chick, John 
Hand, Rita Allegretto, Lisa Donovan, Muffy Smick, Shiela Roy and 
students from the Montrose School 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,678 - 1,413 Republicans; 264 Democrats; 1 Green- 
Rainbow 

Total Registered Voters numbered 8,097 - 20% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as 
follows: 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 




] 


PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


PRESENTIAL PREFERENCE 












Ron Paul 


30 


22 


27 


30 


109 


Mitt Romney 


263 


263 


314 


288 


1128 


Rick Perry 


1 











1 


Rick Santorum 


27 


31 


26 


22 


106 


Jon Huntsman 


2 


2 


4 


2 


10 


Michele Bachmann 








2 





2 


Newt Gingrich 


10 


14 


13 


9 


46 


No Preference 


2 


2 


2 





6 


Write In 


1 


1 


2 





4 


Blanks 











1 


1 
1413 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 












Peter R Hoogerzeil 


69 


69 


75 


79 


292 


Horace AC Mello, Jr 


154 


157 


189 


133 


633 


Write In 


2 


2 





1 


5 


Blanks 


111 


107 


126 


139 


483 
1413 



212 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 












Angela FF Davis 


207 


207 


243 


214 


871 


Write In 


2 








1 


3 


Blanks 


127 


128 


147 


137 


539 
1413 


TOWN COMMITTEE 












James S Wakely 


175 


171 


200 


180 


726 


Joseph Doherty 


185 


165 


199 


170 


719 


Stephen W Fosdick 


170 


162 


193 


175 


700 


William E Adams 


183 


194 


207 


177 


761 


Robert M Skloff 


169 


165 


197 


164 


695 


Gino R Mariani 


185 


164 


199 


177 


725 


Bradford W. Garnett 


182 


178 


221 


193 


774 


Write In 


9 


2 


23 


3 


37 


Blanks 


3446 


3489 


4008 


368 
9 


14632 



19769 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 












PRESIDENTIAL 












PREFERENCE 












Barack Obama 


70 


65 


47 


43 


225 


No Preference 


5 


7 


8 


6 


26 


Write In 








2 


1 


3 


Blanks 


5 


4 





1 


10 
264 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 












Joseph H Kaplan 


54 


64 


46 


34 


198 


Write In 

















Blanks 


26 


12 


11 


17 


66 
264 


STATE COMMITTEE 












WOMAN 












Claire B Naughton 


59 


64 


48 


38 


209 


Write In 

















Blanks 


21 


12 


9 


13 


55 
264 


TOWN COMMITTEE 












Cissy Hull- Allen 


39 


44 


37 


26 


146 


David M Traub 


38 


46 


36 


23 


143 


Robert Luttman 


49 


51 


39 


27 


166 



213 



Rachel D Harrison 


36 


46 


38 


21 


141 


Eileen f Desorgher 


60 


68 


51 


37 


216 


Paul Hinkley 


47 


55 


41 


25 


168 


William F Mohan 


36 


46 


40 


25 


147 


John T Harney 


44 


54 


41 


28 


167 


Christopher T Lennon 


42 


54 


38 


27 


161 


Susan Bernstein 


44 


51 


40 


25 


160 


Rayna Rubin 


40 


46 


40 


23 


149 


Deborah A Wang 


44 


51 


39 


24 


158 


Susan Cotter 


48 


52 


41 


28 


169 


Maureen Malloy Lifsitz 


37 


46 


37 


24 


144 


Cheryl E Dunlea 


47 


48 


41 


26 


162 


William H Dunlea 


40 


47 


39 


26 


152 


Margaret M Vasaturo 


47 


53 


41 


26 


167 


Robert F Curry 


33 


50 


36 


21 


140 


Karl D Lord 


34 


52 


39 


22 


147 


W David Stephenson 


41 


48 


38 


28 


155 


Frederick E Bunger 


37 


46 


36 


27 


146 


Barbara W Bunger 


40 


46 


37 


28 


151 


Garland H Hunt 


40 


49 


36 


22 


147 


Write In 

















Blanks 


1837 


1479 


1094 


119 
6 


5606 



9208 



214 



GREEN RAINBOW BALLOTS 













Kent Mesplay 





Jill Stein 





1 








Harley Mikkelson 














No Preference 














Write In 














Blanks 















STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Write In 
Blanks 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Write In 

Blanks 10 



TOWN COMMITTEE 












Write In 

















Blanks 


10 











10 
10 



Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping, as 
prescribed by law. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 8, 2012 



215 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 26, 2012 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working 
order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to 
the voters posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Sue Munroe, Peggy Caruso, Muffy Smick, Jane Timmerman, 
Janet Casey, Ruth Chick, Sheila Roy and John Hand 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1298 . There are 8,091 registered voters, 16% of voters 
voting. 

PRECINCT 
12 3 4 TOTAL 

MODERATOR (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 

Scott McDermott 326 27 270 214 1089 

Write In 
Blanks 



TOWN CLERK (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 
Carol Mayer 

Write In 
Blanks 



SELECTMEN (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 

Nikolaos Athanasiadis 159 148 167 116 590 





9 











2 


5 





7 


3 


41 


42 


46 


202 
1298 



15 


27 
8 


259 


211 


1063 





1 





2 


3 


84 


43 


58 


47 


232 
1298 



216 



Osier Peterson 
Write In 
Blanks 



ASSESSOR (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 
Thomas Sweeney 
Write In 
Blanks 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 



239 172 


148 


142 


701 


2 








2 


1 


2 


2 


5 
1298 


I ONE 








316 273 


254 


213 


1056 


1 








1 


83 48 


63 


47 


241 
1298 



Maryanne Sullivan 


306 


261 


250 


198 


1015 


Write In 


1 


1 





1 


3 


Blanks 


92 


60 


67 


61 


280 
1298 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 
NOT MORE THAN TWO 

Steven Pelosi 282 244 

Maura McNicholas 295 253 

Write In 1 2 

Blanks 220 145 



PLANNING BOARD (five yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 

Keith Diggins 301 250 

Write In 2 

Blanks 98 70 



PARK COMMISSIONER (three yrs) VOTE 
FOR ONE 

Tom Caragliano 301 258 239 

Write In 3 

Blanks 98 61 78 



217 



239 


189 


954 


247 


195 


990 





1 


4 


148 

IF 


135 


648 
2596 


242 


190 


983 








2 


75 


70 


313 
1298 



194 


992 





3 


66 


303 




1298 



295 


248 


226 


195 


964 


1 


3 


2 


3 


9 


103 


71 


89 


62 


325 
1298 



6 





2 


5 


13 


13 


14 


4 


3 


34 


380 


308 


311 


252 


1251 
1298 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 



Deil Duross 
Write In 
Blanks 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (five yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 



Eldred Whyte 
Write In 
Blanks 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three yrs) 

VOTE FOR ONE 
Georgia Colivas 4 3 

Write In 1 17 

Blanks 394 302 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 27, 2012 



1 


5 


13 


6 


3 


27 


310 


252 


1258 
1298 



218 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

2012 

Norfolk, ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and 
in town affairs, to meet at the CENTER Medfield on Ice House Road in 
said Medfield on Monday the twenty-sixth day of March, A.D. 2012 at 
6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to act on the following items: 

Article 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and One Member of the Housing Authority each for a term 
of one year. 

One Selectmen, One Assessor, One School Committee Member One 
Town Clerk, One Park Commissioner, One Trust Fund Commissioner and 
two Library Trustees each for a term of three years. 

One Member of the Planning Board and One Member of the Housing 
Authority each for a term of five years. 

The polls will open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 
o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the thirtieth day of April, A.D., 2012 commencing at 7:30 
P.M. the following Articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
gymnasium, located on South Street in said Medfield, viz 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several 
Town Officers for the past year. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sums as Perpetual 

219 



Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be 
necessary for said care, viz. 



Perpetual Care 2011 


Iverson, David 


$1,000 


Nolan, Thomas 


$ 550 


Alberta, Paul 


$2,200 


Dhimitri, Claudia 


$1,100 


Sheingold, John 


$2,200 


Judge, Lynn 


$1,100 


Doherty, Edward 


$2,200 


Whelan, John 


$2,200 


Kiessling, Joan 


$2,200 


Derleth, Rita 


$2,200 


Jensen, William 


$1,100 


Chen, Jian 


$2,200 


Foulshan, David 


$2,200 


O'Callaghan, Jeannine 


$ 550 


Whelan, Kenneth 


$2,200 


Lewis, Ann L 


$ 550 


McTernan, John V and Mary A 


$2,200 


Bates, Richard 


$ 550 


TOTAL 


$28,600 



(Cemetery Commissioners) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/12) 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Fire Alarm 
Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi to be used for fire alarm maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds 
not to exceed $32,000 to come from the Maintenance Fee account and to 
authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 



220 



It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize an Ambulance 
Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi to be used for an Ambulance revolving fund for payment of 
principal and interest costs on the ambulance and/or purchase of a 
replacement ambulance, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come from the 
Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to 
expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize an Advanced Life 
Support Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E 
Vi to be used for the payment of Advanced Life Support charges, funds not 
to exceed $60,000 to come from the users of said services or their insurers 
and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

VOTED: To re-authorize an Advanced Life Support Fund, pursuant to 
the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for the 
payment of Advanced Life Support charges and emergency services 
medical control funds not to exceed $60,000 to come from the users of 
said services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend 
from said funds. MOTION CARRIES UNANIMOUS (4/30/2012) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Community 
Gardens Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E Vi to be used for the payment of expenses for the operation of 
the Community Gardens Program, funds not to exceed $1,000 to come 
from registration fees paid by gardeners and to authorize the Town 
Administrator to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 



(Town Administrator) 



221 



It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Rental Income 
Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi to be used for the processing of rental receipts and associated 
expenditures for the CENTER at Medfield, funds not to exceed $30,000 
and to authorize the Council on Aging and/or its Executive Director to 
expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Library 
Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi to be used for payment of costs associated with providing 
photocopier/printer services to library users, with costs associated with 
providing after hours use of public meeting space to community 
organizations and for payment of costs associated with replacing lost or 
damaged materials; funds not to exceed $15,000 to come from the fees 
charged for use of photocopiers/printers, from fees charged for use of 
meeting rooms after regular hours and from the fees charged for the 
replacement of lost or damaged materials; and to authorize the Library 
Director to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Library Director) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize a Respite Care 
Revolving Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi to be used for the payment of costs associated with the operation of 
a respite care program at the Center at Medfield, funds not to exceed 
$50,000 to come from fees charged for participation in the program, 
grants, gifts or such other funds as might be made available for this 
purpose; and to authorize the Council on Aging and/or its Executive 
Director to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 



222 



VOTED: To authorize a Respite Care Revolving Fund, pursuant to the 
provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E l A to be used for the payment 
of costs associated with the operation of a respite care program at the 
Center at Medfield, funds not to exceed $50,000 to come from fees 
charged for participation in the program, grants, gifts or such other funds 
as might be made available for this purpose; and to authorize the Council 
on Aging and/or its Executive Director to expend from said funds, as set 
out in the warrant. MOTION PASSED (4/30/2012) 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept for the fiscal year 2013 

the provisions of section four of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986, in 

accordance with and subject to the provisions of said section four, 

providing for an additional exemption for a taxpayer who shall otherwise 

qualify for an exemption under clauses 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 22D, 

22E, 37A, 41C, 42 or 43 of section five of Chapter 59 of the General 

Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to name the intersection of 
Claypit Road and Causeway Street Robert E. Naughton Civic Square in 
memory of the late Robert E. Naughton, who was a highly decorated 
Medfield Police Detective, active member of the community and who is 
remembered as a Police Officer who made a difference, particularly in the 
lives of troubled teens, and appropriate a sum of money and determine in 
what manner said sum shall be raised, for the installation of a sign, which 
includes the town seal and indicates this designation, and authorize 
appropriate dedicatory services, or do or take any action in relation 
thereto. 

(Committee to Study Memorials) 

VOTED: To name the intersection of Claypit Road and Causeway Street 
Robert E. Naughton Civic Square in memory of the late Robert E. 
Naughton, who was a highly decorated Medfield Police Detective, active 
member of the community and who is remembered as a Police Officer 
who made a difference, particularly in the lives of troubled teens, and 
appropriate $2,000, said sum shall be raised on the fyl3 tax levy, for the 
installation of a sign, which includes the town seal and indicates this 



223 



designation, and for appropriate dedicatory. PASSED UNANIMOUS 
(4/30/2012) 



Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and 
compensation of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, 
Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Park and Recreation Commissioners, Planning Board, Housing Authority 
and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



Officer 


Present Salary 


W.C. Recommends 


Town Clerk 


$56,255 


$57,380 


Selectmen, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Clerk 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Third Member 


900 


900 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, Third Member 


900 


900 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park & Recreation Commissioner 








Trust Fund Commissioner 









(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To fix the salary and compensation of the following elected 
officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation 
Commissioners, Planning Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund 
Commissioners, effective July 1, 2012, by adopting the Warrant 
Committee recommendations as printed in the Warrant. PASSES 
(4/30/2012) 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS 
AND PAY SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2012 to read as set forth in the 
warrant, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

224 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

POLICE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT: 
Sergeant Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 

7/1/2010 $1,169.05 $1,205.20 $1,248.46 
biweekly $2,338.10 $2,410.41 $2,496.92 

7/1/2011 $1,169.05 $1,205.20 $1,248.46 
biweekly $2,338.10 $2,410.41 $2,496.92 

7/1/2012 $1,192.43 $1,229.30 $1,273.43 
biweekly $2,384.86 $2,458.62 $2,546.86 



Police 
Officer 



Stepl 



Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 



7/1/2010 $900.94 $928.81 
biweekly $1,801.89 $1,857.61 



$957.53 $987.14 $1,017.67 $1,049.15 
1,915.05 $1,974.29 $2,035.35 $2,098.29 



7/1/2011 $900.94 $928.81 $957.53 $987.14 $1,017.67 $1,049.15 

biweekly $1,801.89 $1,857.61 $1,915.05 $1,974.29 $2,035.35 $2,098.29 

7/1/2012 $918.96 $947.39 $976.68 $1,006.88 $1,038.02 $1,070.13 

biweekly $1,837.93 $1,894.76 $1,953.35 $2,013.78 $2,076.06 $2,140.26 



Stepl Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 
Dispatcher 

7/1/2010 $619.76 $654.25 $687.26 $722.21 $762.96 

biweekly $1,239.52 $1,308.50 $1,374.51 $1,444.41 $1,525.92 

7/1/2011 $619.76 $654.25 $687.26 $722.21 $762.96 



225 



biweekly $1,239.52 $1,308.50 $1,374.51 $1,444.41 $1,525.92 

7/1/2012 $632.16 $667.34 $701.01 $736.65 $778.22 
biweekly $1,264.31 $1,334.67 $1,402.00 $1,473.30 $1,556.44 



Specialist Range 
















Annual 


7/1/2010 


559.49 


To 


3,199.33 


Stipend 
Annual 


7/1/2011 


559.49 


To 


3,199.33 


Stipend 
Annual 


7/1/2012 


570.68 


To 


3,263.32 


Stipend 



FIRE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT 

Lieutenant/ Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 

Firefighter/ 

EMT 

7/1/2009 23.61 24.35 25.09 25.87 26.67 27.50 

7/1/2010 23.61 24.35 25.09 25.87 26.67 27.50 



Firefighter/EMT Step Step Step Step 4 Step Step Step Step 8 

12 3 5 6 7 

7/1/2009 21.33 21.99 22.62 23.32 24.01 24.75 25.47 26.23 

7/1/2010 21.33 21.99 22.62 23.32 24.01 24.75 25.47 26.23 
* Based on a 42 hour week 

PUBLIC SAFETY POSITIONS 

Stepl Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 
Call 
Firefighter 

/EMT $21.86 $22.53 $23.19 $23.89 $24.60 $25.36 $26.10 $26.89 

Step 5 



$22.20 





Stepl 


Step 2 


Step 3 


Step 4 




Step 6 


Step 7 


Step 8 


Step 9 


Animal Control 










Officer/Inspector 


$19.85 


$20.42 


$20.98 


$21.59 


* Based on a 40- 










hour workweek 


$22.83 


$23.48 


$24.14 


$24.82 



226 



Assistant 

Animal 

Control Officer $1,977.04 $2,160.34 $2,343.65 $2,525.73 $2,712.72 

* Annual 

Stipend $2,896.04 $3,078.12 $3,297.10 



MANAGERIAL 
POSITIONS 

Grade Level I Minimum Midpoint Maximum 

Administrative Asst. to the 

Selectmen/Town 

Administrator $46,839 $52,814 $58,788 

Grade Level II 

No positions at this level $52,694 $58,549 $64,405 

Grade Level III 

No positions at this level $58,549 $64,405 $70,260 



Grade Level IV 

Council on Aging Director 
Park and Recreation Director 

Grade Level V 

Asst Town Administrator 
Principal Assessor 
Town Accountant 
Library Director 
Treasurer 



Grade Level VI 

No positions at this level $76,114 $84,896 $93,678 



$64,405 


$70,260 


$76,114 


$64,405 


$70,260 


$76,114 


$70,260 


$79,041 


$87,824 


$70,260 


$78,854 


$87,824 


$70,260 


$78,854 


$87,824 


$70,260 


$78,854 


$87,824 


$70,260 


$78,854 


$87,824 



227 



Grade Level VII 



Fire Chief 


$93,678 


$111,243 


$128,808 


Police Chief 5 


$93,679 


$111,242 


$128,808 


Superintendent of Public 








Works 


$93,679 


$111,242 


$128,808 


* Receives additional 20% of 








base salary as a result of 








Quinn Bill Educational 








Incentive 








OTHER SALARIED 








POSITIONS 










Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Grade Level I 








Outreach Social Worker 


46,839 


52,694 


58,549 


Conservation Agent (part- 








time) 


23,420 


26,347 


29,275 


Grade Level II 









Director of Youth Outreach 



51,159 



56,844 



62,529 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade 


Min 


Step 

2 


Step 
3 


Step 
4 


Step 

5 


Step 
6 


Step 

7 


Step 

8 


MAX 


10 


9.25 


9.53 


9.79 


10.07 


10.35 


10.65 


10.94 


11.25 


11.58 


20 


14.92 


15.34 


15.77 


16.22 


16.68 


17.16 


17.64 


18.14 


18.65 


30 


16.40 


16.87 


17.35 


17.83 


18.34 


18.86 


19.39 


19.94 


20.50 


40 


18.04 


18.55 


19.07 


19.62 


20.18 


20.75 


21.34 


21.94 


22.55 


50 


19.85 


20.42 


20.99 


21.59 


22.20 


22.83 


23.48 


24.13 


24.82 


60 


21.84 


22.45 


23.09 


23.74 


24.41 


25.10 


25.82 


26.55 


27.30 


70 


23.90 


24.61 


25.35 


26.10 


26.89 


27.69 


28.53 


29.39 


30.26 


80 


25.81 


26.58 


27.38 


28.19 


29.04 


29.91 


30.80 


31.73 


32.68 


90 


27.82 


28.64 


29.50 


30.39 


31.30 


32.23 


33.21 


34.20 


35.22 



228 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



Grade 10 


Grade 50 Grade 90 


Page 


Payroll Administrator Senior Foreman 




Administrative Assistant II 


Grade 20 


Circulation Supervisor 


Clerk Typist 


Equipment Operator 


Library Assistant 


Volunteer Coordinator 


Laborer 


Water Technician 


Mini-Bus Driver 




Police Matron 


Grade 60 


Special Police Officer 


Administrative Assistant III 


Traffic Supervisor 


Children's Librarian 




Park and Rec Program 




Coordinator 


Grade 30 


Reference Librarian 


Office Assistant 




Sr. Library Assistant 


Grade 70 


Truck Driver 


Sr. Equipment Operator 


Transportation 


Sr. Groundskeeper 


Coordinator 






Water Operator 


Grade 40 


Tree Warden 


Administrative Assistant 


Mechanic 


Elder Outreach Worker 




Groundskeeper 


Grade 80 


Maintenance Technician 


Assistant Foreman 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar 

Police Intern 



$418 



Annual 

$9,170 

$2,441 

$181 

to $568 



Police- Private Special Detail 
Tree Climber 



Hourly 

$30.54 
$19.99 



229 



FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

EMS Coordinator 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

INSPECTORS 

Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 

PARK AND RECREATION 

Program Director 

Swim Pond Director 

Swim Pond Assistant Director 

Swim Team Coach/Guard 

Assistant Coach/Guard 

Water Safety Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Swim Pond Badge Checker 

Swim Pond Maintenance 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers 

Camp Director 

Camp Specialists 

Counselors 

Jr. Counselor 

Tennis Director 







$3,681 






$2,208 






$1,767 






$1,683 






$766 


$28.61 per inspection 






$5,527 






$742 






$1,523 






$279 






$4,517 






$1,036 






$2,514 






$742 


$28.61 per inspection 


$15.1 1 per inspection 


$14,271 


to 


$17,351 


$5,944 


to 


$8,326 


$3,966 


to 


$5,553 


$3,303 


to 


$4,579 


$2,116 


to 


$3,749 


$2,512 


to 


$3,749 


$2,390 


to 


$3,471 


$794 


to 


$1,250 


$927 


to 


$1,250 


$661 


to 


$2,775 


$2,643 


to 


$5,313 


$1,324 


to 


$5,258 


$1,059 


to 


$2,776 


$266 


to 


$833 


$3,966 


to 


$5,553 



230 



Tennis Instructor $794 t0 $1>390 

Trainee $ 8 97 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTED: To amend the PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN and 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE, effective 
July 1, 2012 to read as set forth in the warrant. PASSES UNANIMOUS 
(4/30/2012) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen 
or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission or Committee to defray 
operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 
2012, or such other sums as the Town may determine, as required by 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate the sum of $50,176,773 to defray the operating 
expenses of the various Town Boards, Committees, Commissions and 
Departments as printed in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this 
Town Meeting for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 2012 and that to 
meet said appropriation the following sums be raised and appropriated on 
the fiscal 2013 tax levy or transferred from accounts or funds as follows: 

TAX LEVY $45,475,304 

BOND PREMIUM ON $4.2M BOND ISSUED 5,902 

(6/1/07) 

BOND ANTICIPATION NOTE INTEREST 84,203 

REIMBURSEMENT 

PREMIUM ON SAWMILL BROOK BONDS 1 ,508 

UNEXPENDED STREET SWEEPER BOND FUNDS 868 

SCHOOL BUILDING ASSISTANCE MULTI- 1,183,535 

SCHOOL PROJECTS 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE INTEREST 23,000 

ACCOUNT 

PENSION RESERVE FUND 1 00,000 

MASS WATER POLLUTION ABATEMENT TRUST 

TITLE V 

HEALTH SEPTIC LOAN ACCOUNT 30-034 4, 1 74 

231 



STABILIZATION FUND FOR ADVANCE 

PAYMENTS OF SEWER BETTERMENTS 400,000 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 
SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

SUB TOTAL (except for tax levy) 

PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 



1,468,814 
1,429,465 

4,701,469 



Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the 
Fiscal 2013 Tax Levy and or transfer from available funds and/or borrow 
for Capital Expenditures, including the following: 

FY13 CAPITAL BUDGET 



DEPARTMENT 
Board of Selectmen 



PROJECT 

IT Hardware/Software 
Infrastructure Replacements 



Personnel Board 



Reclassification and 
Compensation Study 



Town Accountant 



GSAB Actuarial Study of 
Retiree Health Ins 



Library 



HVAC System Thermostat 

Replacement 

HVAC System Roof Top Air 

Handlers 



Fire Department 



2 Emergency Generators 
Upgrade Medical Equipment 



Council on Aging 



Emergency Generator 



232 



Conservation 
Commission 



Land Acquisition 



School Department 

Wheelock Energy Improvements 

Dale Street Replace Gymnasium Floor 
Window Replacement 

Middle School Installation of Blinds 

High School Replace Side Backboards 

Archive Conversion/Digitize 
District Wide Building Prints 

Outdoor Lighting 
Improvement 



Police Department 



Replace existing radio dispatch 
consoles 

Cruiser Replacement 

Traffic Light Synchronization 



Public Works 



Stone Seal Subdivsions 
EPA Required Stormwater 
Phase II 

Mini Track Paver 



Parks and Recreation 



Waterproof brick at the Pfaff 
Center 

Maintenance Truck 



233 



FY13 CAPITAL BUDGET 
RECOMMENDATIONS 



DEPARTMENT PROJECT 

IT Hardware/Software 
Board of Infrastructure 

Selectmen Replacements 



REQUEST RECOMMEND 



$35,000 



$25,000 



Personnel 
Board 


Reclassification and 
Compensation Study 


$30,000 


$16,000 


Town 
Accountant 


GSAB Actuarial Study 
of Retiree Health Ins 


$5,000 


$0 


Library 


HVAC System 
Thermostat Replacement 
HVAC System Roof Top 
Air Handlers 


$8,975 
$37,250 


$8,975 

$37,250 


Fire 
Department 


2 Emergency Generators 
Upgrade Medical 
Equipment 


$17,000 
$10,401 


$17,000 
$10,401 


Council on 
Aging 


Emergency Generator 


$43,000 


$0 



Conservation 

Commission Land Acquisition 



50,000 



$5,000 



School 
Department 



Wheelock Energy Improvements 



$55,200 



$34,300 



Replace Gymnasium 
Dale Street Floor 

Window Replacement 



$38,000 
$42,500 



$38,000 
$42,500 



234 



Middle School Installation of Blinds 



$7,345 



$0 



High School 


Replace Side 
Backboards 


$10,200 


$10,200 


District Wide 


Archive 

Conversion/Digitize 
Building Prints 
Outdoor Lighting 
Improvement 


$18,500 
$54,500 


$8,900 
$48,500 


Police 
Department 


Replace existing radio 
dispatch consoles 


$97,000 


$97,000 




Cruiser Replacement 
Traffic Light 
Synchronization 


$31,000 
$20,000 


$31,000 
$20,000 


Public Works 


Stone Seal Subdivsions 
EPA Required 
Stormwater Phase II 


$40,000 
$50,000 


$40,000 
$50,000 




Mini Track Paver 


$33,900 


$0 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Waterproof brick at the 
Pfaff Center 


$38,000 


$23,000 




Maintenance Truck 


$50,000 


$0 




Total Requests 


$822,771 


$563,026 


To be funded 
by: 


Tax Levy 


$550,225 






Unexpended 
Appropriation Funds 

Fire Department 
Unexpended Capital 


$10,401 





235 



Funds 

School Department 

Unexpended Capital 

Funds $2,400 

$563,026 



(Capital Budget Committee) 

VOTED: To appropriate the sum of $563,026 for capital expenditures as 
recommended in the Warrant Report and that to meet said appropriation 
the following sums be raised on the fiscal 2013 tax levy or transferred 
from accounts or funds as follows: 

Tax Levy $550,226 

Unexpended Appropriation Funds 

Fire ATM 2009, Article 17, ATM 2010, Article 15, ATM, Article 16 
$10,401 

School ATM 2011, Article 1 6 2,399 

$12,800 

Total $563,026 

PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $223,424 from sewer 
betterments paid-in-advance to the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established 
under Article 3 1 of the 2004 ATM in accordance with the provisions of 
G.L., Chapter 40, Section 5B as amended by Chapter 46 of the Acts of 
2003, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Town Accountant) 

VOTED: To transfer $223,424 from sewer betterments paid-in-advance 
to the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established under Article 3 1 of the 2004 
ATM in accordance with the provisions of G.L., Chapter 40, Section 5B as 
amended by Chapter 46 of the Acts of 2003. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE 
(4/30/2012) 

236 



Article 18. To see of the Town will vote to transfer $30,3 12 from the fy 12 

County Retirement Contribution Budget, account 01-911-2, to the 

Unfunded Retiree Health Insurance Stabilization Fund, established under 

Article 26 of the 2006 ATM for the purpose of setting aside monies to 

cover the unfunded retiree health insurance costs in accordance with the 

provisions of G.L., Chapter 40 Section 5B as amended by Chapter 46 of 

the Acts of 2003, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: To transfer $30,312 from the fyl2 County Retirement 
Contribution Budget, account 01-911-2, to the Unfunded Retiree Health 
Insurance Stabilization Fund, established under Article 26 of the 2006 
ATM for the purpose of setting aside monies to cover the unfunded retiree 
health insurance costs in accordance with the provisions of G.L., Chapter 
40 Section 5B as amended by Chapter 46 of the Acts of 2003. 
PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of 
engaging the services of a municipal code publisher to codify the town 
charter, by-laws and regulations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town By-law and Charter 
Review Committee) 

VOTED: To appropriate $10,000, said sum to be raised on the fyl3 tax 
levy, for the purpose of engaging the services of a municipal code 
publisher to codify the town charter, by-laws and regulations. MOTION 
CARRIES (4/30/2012) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield 
Zoning Bylaw Section 5 Use Regulations, Subsection 5.3 Uses Subject to 
Other Regulations by adding a new Sub-Subsection 5.3.1 1, as follows: 

5.3.1 1 For use of a temporary storage container, such as a POD, a 
permit must be obtained from the Building Inspector, who may issue the 
permit for a period not to exceed six months. 

and Subsection 5.4 Table of Use Regulations by striking the existing Table 
and replacing it with a new Table of Use Regulations , which is on file and 



237 



available for public inspection at the Medfield Town House in the Town 
Clerk's office and copies of which are also available for public inspection 
in the Planning Board's office and at the Memorial Public Library, the 
deletions, additions, and revisions contained in said amendment being 
summarized as follows: 

Delete the following sub-subsections, together with the use(s) and 
permitted location(s) designated therein: 

5.4.2.4 Non-profit country, hunting, fishing, tennis or golf club 

without liquor license 

5.4.2.9 Street, bridge, tunnel 

5.4.2.10 Temporary (not over 30 days) amusement enterprise, not 
including any permanent structure 

5.4.2. 1 1 Temporary structures for storage of materials or equipment 
5.4.3.3 Temporary (not exceeding a period of three consecutive 
months) greenhouse or stand for retail sale of agricultural or farm products 
raised primarily on the premises 

5.4.4.26 Filling of land or watercourse, water body or wetlands (see 
Sections 10.4 and 11.4) 

5.4.4.27 Construction of drainage facilities or damming or 
relocating any watercourse, water body or wetlands (see Sections 10.4 and 
11.4) 

5.4.5.3 Manufacturing: 

a. Furniture, lumber and wood products 

b. Primary metal industries 

c. Fabricated metal industrial 

d. Machinery, electrical machinery, equipment and 
supplies 

e. Motor vehicle equipment 

f. Transportation equipment 

g. Other durable goods 

h. Food and kindred products 
i. Textile and mill products 
j. Apparel and other fabricated textile products 
k. Printing, publishing and allied industries, except 
paper manufacturing 
1. Chemicals and allied products 
m. Other nondurable goods 

5.4.5.4 Railroads and railway express service 

5.4.5.6 Taxicab stands and public transportation ticket sales 

238 



and renumber remaining sub-subsections, as necessary. 

Add the following sub-subsections, together with the use(s) and permitted 
location(s) designated therein: 

5.4.1.10 Temporary Storage Containers (See Section 5.3.1 1) 

5.4.1.12 Travel trailers or mobile homes (See Section 14.10. 6. a) 

5.4.2.9 Library, museum or non-profit art gallery 

5.4.2.10 Veterinary hospital in which all animals are in completely 
enclosed structures at least 200 feet from any property line 

5.4.5.3 Manufacturing/fabrication 

5.4.5.4 Research and development 
5.4.5.6 Printing and publishing 

Revise the use description(s) and/or location(s): 

5.4.1.6 Add: (see Section 6.2.11) 

5.4.1.8 Strike: "a building" and replace with: "the zoning district 
setbacks" 

5.4.1.9 Strike reference to Section 14.10.6.a 

5.4.2 Strike: "Community Facilities" and replace with: "Public, 
Semi-Public, Institutional" 

5.4.2.1 Church or other religious use strike "Yes" in all Districts 
and replace with "PB" (site plan approval) 

5.4.2.2 Education use which is religious, sectarian, denominational 
or public strike existing designated uses and replace with "Public or non- 
profit education uses" and strike "Yes" in all districts and replace with 
"PB" (site plan approval) 

5.4.2.3 Non-profit facility, etc. strike "No" in A district and "Yes" 
in all other districts and replace with "PB site plan approval" in all 
districts 

5.4.2.4 Strike existing description of uses and replace with: 
"Recreational activities" 

5.4.2.5 Strike existing description of uses and replace with: 
"Camp" and expand to allow use by special permit ("SP") in all districts 
5.4.2.8 Strike existing description of uses and replace with: 
"Hospital, convalescent, nursing home, hospice, continuing care, or 
assisted living facility" 

5.4.3 Agricultural add following notation: The following 
regulations apply to parcels of less than five acres or parcels of less than 



239 



two acres, if annual sales of products is at least $1,000 per acre, as 
provided in G.L. Chapter 40A, Section 3 

5.4.3.2 Strike "Year-round greenhouse or stand" and replace with 
"Greenhouse or farmstand"; strike existing district use designations and 
replace as noted 

5.4.3.3 Strike existing description of uses and replace with 
"Raising livestock, including horses, and the keeping of poultry, cattle, or 
other domesticated animals used for food purposes and bees (excluding 
swine). 

5.4.3.4 Strike existing description of uses and replace with 
"Commercial stables and/or boarding of animals" and strike "SP" and 
replace with "Yes" in A (Agricultural) District 

5.4.4 Strike "Retail and Service" and replace with 

"Commercial/Business" (see Section 14) 

5.4.4.1 Strike existing description of uses and replace with "Retail 
stores, including hardware, markets and similar stores, whose sale is not 
regulated elsewhere in this use table" and strike "No" and replace with 
"PB" in I-E District 

5.4.4.2 Strike "No" and replace with "SP" in I-E District 

5.4.4.4 Strike "PB" and "NO" and replace with "SP" in the B-I and 

I-E District 

5.4.4.8 Add to existing description of uses: "Such as salons, 
grooming, personal care, and similar services" and strike "No" and replace 
with "PB" in I-E District 

5.4.4.8.a Add to existing description of uses: fortuneteller 

establishments 

5.4.4.9 Strike "No" and replace with "PB" in I-E District 

5.4.4.10 Strike "Convalescent or nursing homes and" from existing 
description of uses and strike "No" and replace with "SP" in I-E District 
5.4.4.12 Add to existing description of uses: "Excluding pawn 
brokering" 

5.4.4.14 Strike existing description of uses and replace with "Motor 

vehicle filling station" 

5.4.4.17 Add, after existing description of uses: "such as home 

electronics equipment, appliance and furniture repair" 

5.4.4.21 Add "See Section 17" and strike use designation in each 

zoning district 

5. 4.4.21. a Add "See Section 17" and strike use designation in each 

zoning district 

5.4.4.23 Strike "not including gyrocopters" from description of uses 



240 



5.4.4.26 Strike existing description of uses and replace with "Small 
engine repair (lawnmowers, etc.) 

5.4.4.27 Strike "PB" and replace with "SP" in B (Business) District 
5.4.5.8 Add, after description of existing uses; "See Section 12" 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: To amend the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw Subsection 5 
Use Regulations, Subsection 5.3 Uses Subject to Other Regulations by 
adding a new Sub-Subsection 5.3.1 1, as set out in the warrant and, further, 
amend Subsection 5.4 Table of Use Regulations , which is on file and 
available for public inspection at the Medfield Town House in the Town 
Clerk's office and copies of which are also available for public inspection 
in the Planning Board's office and at the Memorial Public Library, with 
the deletions, additions, and revisions contained in said amendment and 
summarized in the warrant. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 



Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Kettle Pond Station + 00 to 
Station 5 + 84.53 

Cole Drive Station + 00 to 
Station 9+19.21 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on a plan referred to 
in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, 
as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 



(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To to accept as public ways the following named streets, or 
parts thereof: 

Kettle Pond Station + 00 to Station 5 + 84.53 

241 



Cole Drive Station + 00 to Station 9+19.21 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on a plan referred to 
in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, 
as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes. PASSED BY 2/3 
VOTE (4/30/2012) 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purposes of 
making repairs to the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant and to the 
sewer system and to inspect various sewer system sump pumps and 
conduct camera inspections and smoke tests to identify additional sewer 
system leaks; and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of 
Paragraph(l), Section 7, G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling statute; 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Water and Sewer 
Commissioners to apply for and receive grants from the Federal and/or 
State governments and/or private parties; and to enter into contracts with 
designers, consultants and contractors to accomplish said purposes, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Commissioners) 

VOTED: To appropriate $400,000, said sum to be raised by borrowing 
for the purposes of making repairs to the Medfield Wastewater Treatment 
Plant and to the sewer system and to inspect various sewer system sump 
pumps and conduct camera inspections and smoke tests to identify 
additional sewer system leaks; and that the Treasurer/Collector, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow in 
accordance with the provisions of Paragraph( 1 ), Section 7, G.L. Chapter 
44, or any other enabling statute; and that the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Water and Sewer Commissioners be authorized to apply for and 
receive grants from the Federal and/or State governments and/or private 
parties; and to enter into contracts with designers, consultants and 
contractors to accomplish said purposes. PASSED BY THE 
REQUIRED 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of 

242 



replacing water mains in portions of North Street and Green Street, 
authorize the Treasurer-Collector, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen to borrow, in accordance with the provisions of Paragraph (5) , 
Section 8, G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling statute, for said 
purposes, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase 
or eminent domain, such right, title or interest as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes and to authorize the Water and Sewer 
Commissioners to apply for state and or federal grants and to enter into 
contracts with federal and/or state agencies and/or private contractors, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Commissioners) 

VOTED: To appropriate $1,400,000, said sum to be borrowed, for the 
purpose of replacing water mains in portions of North Street and Green 
Street, and that the Treasurer-Collector, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow, in accordance with the provisions of 
Paragraph (5) , Section 8, G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling statute, 
for said purposes, and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
acquire by gift, purchase or eminent domain, such right, title or interest as 
may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, and that the Water and 
Sewer Commissioners be authorized to apply for state and or federal 
grants and to enter into contracts with federal and/or state agencies and/or 
private contractors to accomplish said purposes. PASSED BY THE 
REQUIRED 2/3 VOTE (4/30/2012) 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of 
conducting a pilot study for treatment and disinfection of water wells 
numbered three, four and five, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Commissioners) 

VOTED: To dismiss this article (consent calendar 4/30/2012) 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
for the continued study of the proposed lease and rail trail conversion of 
the former Charles River Branch Line rail corridor from Medfield junction 
toward Dover, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to submit a non- 
binding application for a 50% match towards an environmental insurance 
policy through the state's Brownfields Redevelopment Access to Capital 



243 



program, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Bay Colony Rail Trail Study Committee) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Move that the Town appropriate $1,000, said 
sum to be raised on the fy2013 tax levy, for the continued study to 
include: 

1. What are the proposed uses of the Rail Trail? Would it be open to 
high-speed bicycles and mountain bikes? Would it be open to 
equestrian use? 

2. How would use be monitored? How would traffic on the trail be 
monitored? 

3. What would the surface be - stone dust, gravel, asphalt? How 
would this affect the proposed uses? How would/could the 
community get guarantees that a gravel trail does not get paved 
later, if the community determines that a paved trail is less 
desirable? 

4. Where would users park their cars to use the trail? 

5. Many existing trails in Dover and Medfield cross the old rail bed. 
Would these trails be cut off or kept open, and would users of the 
new rail trail have access to these side trails for hiking, biking etc? 

6. Where would funds come from to build the trail and over time, 
maintain the trail? Would this become a town responsibility? 

7. How would road crossings be managed to provide safety to rail 
trail users and traffic? 

8. How would the towns integrate their different regulations along the 
length of the trail? For example, Dover has no leash law but 
Medfield does - would dogs be allowed, and if so, would Dover 
need to implement a leash law at least for the trail? 

9. What has been the experience of other towns, and how should the 
Rail Trail concept be customized for our relatively rural 
community? 

of the proposed lease and rail trail conversion of the former Charles River 
Branch Line rail corridor from Medfield junction toward Dover, and that 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to submit a non-binding application 
for a 50% match towards an environmental insurance policy through the 
state's Brownfields Redevelopment Access to Capital program. 
AMENDMENT PASSES (4/30/2012) 



244 



Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of 
hiring consultants, engineers and/or attorneys to advise the Town on 
matters concerning the disposition and reuse and/or the environmental site 
remediation of the former Medfield State Hospital property, said funds to 
be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen, with the 
understanding that the Board of Selectmen may authorize any other Town 
board, commission, committee or department to expend a portion of said 
funds for such purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $75,000, said sum shall be raised on the fy2013 
tax levy, for the purpose of hiring consultants, engineers and/or attorneys 
to advise the Town on matters concerning the disposition and reuse and/or 
the environmental site remediation of the former Medfield State Hospital 
property, said funds to be expended under the direction of the Board of 
Selectmen, with the understanding that the Board of Selectmen may 
authorize any other Town board, commission, committee or department to 
expend a portion of said funds for such purposes. PASSED 
UNANIMOUS (4/30/2012) 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Medfield Zoning Bylaw Section 10.2 Definition by striking the existing 
Section 10.2 Definition and replacing the existing definition with the 
following: 

10.2 DEFINITION 

The Flood Plain District is superimposed over all Districts established by 
this Bylaw. The Flood Plain District is defined as all lands along or 
sloping to the Stop River and Charles River whose elevation is below 125 
feet Mean Sea Level based on the Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 1929 
(Elevation 124 based on NAVD 1988) and as shown on the Zoning Map 
of the Town of Medfield and all the A Zone Flood areas as shown on the 
Department of Homeland Security Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) 
dated July 17, 2012, Community #250242, panel numbers: 0153, 0154, 
0158, 0159, 0162, 0164, 0166, 0167, 0168, and 0169, as amended, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



245 



VOTED: To amend the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw Section 10.2 
Definition by striking the existing Section 10.2 Definition and replacing 
the existing definition with a new Section 10.2 as follows: 

10.2 DEFINITION 

The Flood Plain District is superimposed over all Districts established by 
this Bylaw. The Flood Plain District is defined as all lands along or 
sloping to the Stop River and Charles River whose elevation is below 125 
feet Mean Sea Level based on the Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 1929 
(Elevation 124 based on NAVD 1988) and as shown on the Zoning Map 
of the Town of Medfield and all the A Zone Flood areas (Zone A and 
Zone AE) as shown on the Department of Homeland Security Flood 
Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for Norfolk County, dated July 17, 2012, 
Community #250242, panel numbers: 25021 CO 153E, 25021 CO 154E, 
25021C0158E,25021C0159E, 25021C0162E, 25021C0164E, 
25021C0166E, 25021C0167E, 25021C0168E, and 25021C0169 as 
amended. 

In Zones A and AE, along watercourses that have not had a regulatory 
floodway designated, the best available Federal, State, local, or other 
floodway data shall be used to prohibit encroachments in floodways which 
would result in any increase in flood levels within the community during 
the occurrence of the base flood discharge. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE 
(4/30/2012) 

Article 28. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Assessors to 
use a sum of money from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate for the fiscal year 2013, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Assessors to use $500,000 from free 
cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the fiscal year 
2013. MOTION PASSES (4/30/2012) 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at lease before the time of holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting 

246 



aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 16th day of March, Two-Thousand 
and Twelve. 



Osier L. Peterson, Chairman S/ 
Ann B. Thompson S/ 
Mark L. Fisher S/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and at town meetings, by 
posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before 
the date of the elections as within directed. 

Constable: Larz Anderson S/ 
Date: March 16,2012 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 

RE; Medfield Annual Town Meeting of April 30, 2012 - Zoning 

Warrant Articles 20 and 27. 

Pursuant to G.L. c. 40 §32 notice is hereby given that the Attorney 

General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has approved the 

Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw, Section 5 and Section 10, as voted at 

Town meeting April 30, 2012 as Article 20 and Article 27, 

respectively, with the following changes to Article 20, Section 5: 

Section 5.4.3 should read: "The following regulations apply to parcels 

as provided in G.L. Chapter 40A, §3." 

Section 5.4.3.3 to include swine (G.L. c. 40A, §3 allows for swine, thus, 

the Bylaw must also allow swine). 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 
July 12, 2012 



247 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 

SS. Norfolk 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to 
vote at Precinct 1, 2, 3, 4, at the Center at Medfield, Ice House Rd. in said 
Medfield, on THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2012, 
from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following offices: 



SENATOR IN 
CONGRESS 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 
CONGRESS 



4 th CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



COUNCILLOR 



2nd DISTRICT 



SENATOR IN THE GENERAL 
COURT 



NORFOLK & BRISTOL 
DISTRICT 



REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 
GENERAL COURT 



9th & 13th NORFOLK 
DISTRICT 



CLERK OF COURTS 



NORFOLK COUNTY 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 



NORFOLK DISTRICT 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 



NOROLK COUNTY 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and place of said voting. Given under our hands this 7th day of 
August, 2012. 



248 



Ann Thompson S/ 
Mark Fisher S/ 
Osier Peterson S/ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five 
public places seven days before the date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Larz Anderson 
Date: August 13,2012 

ATRUE COPY ATTEST 
Carol Mayer, Town Clerk 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working 
order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to 
the voters posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Peggy Caruso, Sue Munroe, Ruth Chick, John Hand, Janet 
Casey, Joanne Surette, Patty Iafolla, Tony Centore, Linda Kushner, Lisa 
Donovan, Richard Clarke, Pat Shapiro, John Barry, Muffy Smick, Shiela 
Roy and Gerry Finn 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 



249 



The total vote was 1067 - Democrat - 581, Republican - 486, Green 
Rainbow - 0. There are 8232 registered voters, 13% of voters voting. 









PRECINCT 




DEMOCRAT 




1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote 


for 












ONE 














Elizabeth A Warren 




145 


129 


113 


106 


493 


Write In 




2 


2 


3 


3 


10 


Blanks 




24 


15 


22 


17 


78 
581 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 












vote for ONE 














Rachel E Brown 




12 


7 


13 


10 


42 


Joseph P Kennedy, III 




148 


133 


113 


107 


501 


Herb Robinson 




8 


3 


9 


5 


25 


Write In 



















Blanks 




3 


3 


3 


4 


13 
581 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 














Brian M Clinton 




10 


7 


14 


12 


43 


Robert L. Jubinville 




44 


31 


37 


39 


151 


Patrick J McCabe 




18 


10 


21 


12 


61 


Bart Andrew Timilty 




69 


68 


38 


40 


215 


Write In 







1 








1 


Blanks 




30 


29 


28 


23 


110 
581 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 












vote for ONE 














James E. Timilty 




136 


123 


111 


93 


463 


Write In 



















Blanks 




35 


23 


27 


33 


118 
581 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 












COURT vote for ONE 














Denise C Garlick (P 1 & 2) 




140 


131 






271 


(P 3 & 4) 








3 


1 


4 


Write In 










3 


1 


4 


Blanks 




31 


15 


135 


125 


306 
581 



CLERK OF COURTS vote for ONE 



250 



Walter F Timilty, Jr 

Write In 

Blanks 



129 


113 


101 


86 


429 





2 








2 


42 


31 


37 


40 


150 
581 



REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 



William O'Donnell 


135 


118 


107 


92 


452 


Write In 





1 








1 


Blanks 


36 


27 


31 


34 


128 
581 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for 












not more than TWO 












John M Gillis 


73 


70 


70 


70 


283 


Francis W O'Brien 


125 


96 


95 


81 


397 


Write In 

















Blanks 


144 


126 


111 


101 


482 
1162 


REPUBLICAN 












SENATOR IN CONGRESS vote for 












ONE 












Scott P Brown 


123 


106 


102 


140 


471 


Write In 


1 


1 


1 





3 


Blanks 


3 


5 


3 


1 


12 
486 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 












vote for ONE 












Sean Bielat 


107 


82 


88 


111 


388 


Elizabeth Childs 


11 


24 


14 


19 


68 


Davie L Steinhof 


7 


4 


4 


7 


22 


Write In 

















Blanks 


2 


2 





4 


8 
486 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 












Earl H Sholley 


99 


86 


84 


111 


380 


Write In 

















Blanks 


28 


26 


22 


30 


106 
486 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 












vote for ONE 












Jeffrey Robert Bailey 


96 


85 


84 


108 


373 


Write In 


1 


1 








2 


Blanks 


30 


26 


22 


33 


111 
486 



251 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 












COURT vote for ONE 












(P 1 & 2) 





3 






3 


Daniel B Winslow (P 3 & 4) 






89 


120 


209 


Write In 






1 





1 


Blanks 


127 


109 


16 


21 


273 
486 


CLERK OF COURTS vote for ONE 












Write In 











2 


2 


Blanks 


127 


112 


106 


139 


484 
486 


REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 












Write In 











1 


1 


Blanks 


127 


112 


106 


140 


485 
486 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for 












not more than TWO 












Write In 


1 


1 





2 


4 


Blanks 


253 


223 


212 


280 


968 
972 



NO GREEN RAINBOW BALLOTS 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

September 10, 2012 



252 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 6, 2012 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 



GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to 
vote at Precinct 1, 2, 3, 4, at the Center at Medfield, Ice House Rd. in said 
Medfield on TUESDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 from 
6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following offices: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates for the 
following offices: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE PRESIDENT 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 
CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN THE GENERAL 
COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 
GENERAL COURT 

CLERK OF COURTS 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 



STATE WIDE 

FORTHE COMMONWEALTH 
4th DISTRICT 

Second DISTRICT 
NORFOLK & BRISTOL 

9 th & 13 th NORFOLK 
DISTRICT 

NORFORK COUNTY 

NORFOLK COUNTY 

NORFOLK DISTRICT 



253 



QUESTION 1: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the 
Senate or the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2012? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would prohibit any motor vehicle manufacturer, starting with 
model year 2015, from selling or leasing, either directly or through a dealer, a 
new motor vehicle without allowing the owner to have access to the same 
diagnostic and repair information made available to the manufacturer's dealers 
and in-state authorized repair facilities. 

The manufacturer would have to allow the owner, or the owner's designated in- 
state independent repair facility (one not affiliated with a manufacturer or its 
authorized dealers), to obtain diagnostic and repair information electronically, on 
an hourly, daily, monthly, or yearly subscription basis, for no more than fair 
market value and on terms that do not unfairly favor dealers and authorized 
repair facilities. 

The manufacturer would have to provide access to the information through a 
non-proprietary vehicle interface, using a standard applied in federal emissions- 
control regulations. Such information would have to include the same content, 
and be in the same form and accessible in the same manner, as is provided to the 
manufacturer's dealers and authorized repair facilities. 

For vehicles manufactured from 2002 through model year 2014, the proposed 
law would require a manufacturer of motor vehicles sold in Massachusetts to 
make available for purchase, by vehicle owners and in-state independent repair 
facilities, the same diagnostic and repair information that the manufacturer makes 
available through an electronic system to its dealers and in-state authorized repair 
facilities. Manufacturers would have to make such information available in the 
same form and manner, and to the same extent, as they do for dealers and 
authorized repair facilities. The information would be available for purchase on 
an hourly, daily, monthly, or yearly subscription basis, for no more than fair 
market value and on terms that do not unfairly favor dealers and authorized 
repair facilities. 

For vehicles manufactured from 2002 through model year 2014, the proposed 
law would also require manufacturers to make available for purchase, by vehicle 
owners and in-state independent repair facilities, all diagnostic repair tools, 
incorporating the same diagnostic, repair and wireless capabilities as those 
available to dealers and authorized repair facilities. Such tools would have to be 
made available for no more than fair market value and on terms that do not 
unfairly favor dealers and authorized repair facilities. 



254 



For all years covered by the proposed law, the required diagnostic and repair 
information would not include the information necessary to reset a vehicle 
immobilizer, an anti-theft device that prevents a vehicle from being started unless 
the correct key code is present. Such information would have to be made 
available to dealers, repair facilities, and owners through a separate, secure data 
release system. 

The proposed law would not require a manufacturer to reveal a trade secret and 
would not interfere with any agreement made by a manufacturer, dealer, or 
authorized repair facility that is in force on the effective date of the proposed law. 
Starting January 1, 2013, the proposed law would prohibit any agreement that 
waives or limits a manufacturer's compliance with the proposed law. 

Any violation of the proposed law would be treated as a violation of existing 
state consumer protection and unfair trade-practices laws. 

A YES VOTE would enact the proposed law requiring motor vehicle 
manufacturers to allow vehicle owners and independent repair facilities in 
Massachusetts to have access to the same vehicle diagnostic and repair 
information made available to the manufacturers' Massachusetts dealers and 
authorized repair facilities. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in existing laws. 

QUESTION 2: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the 
Senate or the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2012? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow a physician licensed in Massachusetts to prescribe 
medication, at a terminally ill patient's request, to end that patient's life. To 
qualify, a patient would have to be an adult resident who (1) is medically 
determined to be mentally capable of making and communicating health care 
decisions; (2) has been diagnosed by attending and consulting physicians as having 
an incurable, irreversible disease that will, within reasonable medical judgment, 
cause death within six months; and (3) voluntarily expresses a wish to die and has 
made an informed decision. The proposed law states that the patient would ingest 
the medicine in order to cause death in a humane and dignified manner. 

The proposed law would require the patient, directly or through a person familiar 
with the patient's manner of communicating, to orally communicate to a physician 
on two occasions, 15 days apart, the patient's request for the medication. At the 
time of the second request, the physician would have to offer the patient an 
opportunity to rescind the request. The patient would also have to sign a standard 
form, in the presence of two witnesses, one of whom is not a relative, a beneficiary 

255 



of the patient's estate, or an owner, operator, or employee of a health care facility 
where the patient receives treatment or lives. 

The proposed law would require the attending physician to: (1) determine if the 
patient is qualified; (2) inform the patient of his or her medical diagnosis and 
prognosis, the potential risks and probable result of ingesting the medication, and 
the feasible alternatives, including comfort care, hospice care and pain control; (3) 
refer the patient to a consulting physician for a diagnosis and prognosis regarding 
the patient's disease, and confirmation in writing that the patient is capable, acting 
voluntarily, and making an informed decision; (4) refer the patient for psychiatric 
or psychological consultation if the physician believes the patient may have a 
disorder causing impaired judgment; (5) recommend that the patient notify next of 
kin of the patient's intention; (6) recommend that the patient have another person 
present when the patient ingests the medicine and to not take it in a public place; 
(7) inform the patient that he or she may rescind the request at any time; (8) write 
the prescription when the requirements of the law are met, including verifying that 
the patient is making an informed decision; and (9) arrange for the medicine to be 
dispensed directly to the patient, or the patient's agent, but not by mail or courier. 

The proposed law would make it punishable by imprisonment and/or fines, for 
anyone to (1) coerce a patient to request medication, (2) forge a request, or (3) 
conceal a rescission of a request. The proposed law would not authorize ending a 
patient's life by lethal injection, active euthanasia, or mercy killing. The death 
certificate would list the underlying terminal disease as the cause of death. 

Participation under the proposed law would be voluntary. An unwilling health care 
provider could prohibit or sanction another health care provider for participating 
while on the premises of, or while acting as an employee of or contractor for, the 
unwilling provider. 

The proposed law states that no person would be civilly or criminally liable or 
subject to professional discipline for actions that comply with the law, including 
actions taken in good faith that substantially comply. It also states that it should not 
be interpreted to lower the applicable standard of care for any health care provider. 

A person's decision to make or rescind a request could not be restricted by will or 
contract made on or after January 1, 2013, and could not be considered in issuing, 
or setting the rates for, insurance policies or annuities. Also, the proposed law 
would require the attending physician to report each case in which life-ending 
medication is dispensed to the state Department of Public Health. The Department 
would provide public access to statistical data compiled from the reports. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts was held invalid, the other parts 
would stay in effect. 



256 



A YES VOTE would enact the proposed law allowing a physician licensed in 
Massachusetts to prescribe medication, at the request of a terminally-ill patient 
meeting certain conditions, to end that person's life. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in existing laws. 

QUESTION 3: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the 
Senate or the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2012? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would eliminate state criminal and civil penalties for the 
medical use of marijuana by qualifying patients. To qualify, a patient must have 
been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition, such as cancer, glaucoma, 
HIV-positive status or AIDS, hepatitis C, Crohn's disease, Parkinson's disease, 
ALS, or multiple sclerosis. The patient would also have to obtain a written 
certification, from a physician with whom the patient has a bona fide physician- 
patient relationship, that the patient has a specific debilitating medical condition 
and would likely obtain a net benefit from medical use of marijuana. 

The proposed law would allow patients to possess up to a 60-day supply of 
marijuana for their personal medical use. The state Department of Public Health 
(DPH) would decide what amount would be a 60-day supply. A patient could 
designate a personal caregiver, at least 21 years old, who could assist with the 
patient's medical use of marijuana but would be prohibited from consuming that 
marijuana. Patients and caregivers would have to register with DPH by 
submitting the physician's certification. 

The proposed law would allow for non-profit medical marijuana treatment 
centers to grow, process and provide marijuana to patients or their caregivers. A 
treatment center would have to apply for a DPH registration by (1) paying a fee 
to offset DPH's administrative costs; (2) identifying its location and one 
additional location, if any, where marijuana would be grown; and (3) submitting 
operating procedures, consistent with rules to be issued by DPH, including 
cultivation and storage of marijuana only in enclosed, locked facilities. 

A treatment center's personnel would have to register with DPH before working 
or volunteering at the center, be at least 21 years old, and have no felony drug 
convictions. In 2013, there could be no more than 35 treatment centers, with at 
least one but not more than five centers in each county. In later years, DPH could 
modify the number of centers. 

The proposed law would require DPH to issue a cultivation registration to a 
qualifying patient whose access to a treatment center is limited by financial 
hardship, physical inability to access reasonable transportation, or distance. This 

257 



would allow the patient or caregiver to grow only enough plants, in a closed, 
locked facility, for a 60-day supply of marijuana for the patient's own use. 
DPH could revoke any registration for a willful violation of the proposed law. 
Fraudulent use of a DPH registration could be punished by up to six months in a 
house of correction or a fine of up to $500, and fraudulent use of a registration 
for the sale, distribution, or trafficking of marijuana for non-medical use for 
profit could be punished by up to five years in state prison or by two and one-half 
years in a house of correction. 

The proposed law would (1) not give immunity under federal law or obstruct 
federal enforcement of federal law; (2) not supersede Massachusetts laws 
prohibiting possession, cultivation, or sale of marijuana for nonmedical purposes; 
(3) not allow the operation of a motor vehicle, boat, or aircraft while under the 
influence of marijuana; (4) not require any health insurer or government entity to 
reimburse for the costs of the medical use of marijuana; (5) not require any health 
care professional to authorize the medical use of marijuana; (6) not require any 
accommodation of the medical use of marijuana in any workplace, school bus or 
grounds, youth center, or correctional facility; and (7) not require any 
accommodation of smoking marijuana in any public place. 

The proposed law would take effect January 1, 2013, and states that if any of its 
part were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would enact the proposed law eliminating state criminal and civil 
penalties related to the medical use of marijuana, allowing patients meeting 
certain conditions to obtain marijuana produced and distributed by new state- 
regulated centers or, in specific hardship cases, to grow marijuana for their own 
use. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in existing laws. 

QUESTION 4 - THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the state representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of a 
resolution calling upon Congress to propose an amendment to the U.S. 
constitution affirming that (1) corporations are not entitled to the constitutional 
rights of human beings, and (2) both Congress and the states may place limits on 
political contributions and political spending? 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said election. 



258 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and p 
October, 2012. 



the time and place of said voting. Given under our hands this 2 nd day of 



Ann Thompson, S/ 
Mark Fisher, S/ 
Osier Peterson, S/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five 
public places seven days before the date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Ray Burton 
Date: October 3, 2012 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, S/ CMMC, CMC 
TOWN CLERK 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 6, 2012 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working 
order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to 
the voters posted. 

259 



WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Al Allegretto, Peggy Caruso, Sue Munroe, Ruth Chick, John 
Hand, Janet Casey, Rita Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, Linda Kushner, 
Lisa Donovan, David Foulsham, John Barry, Steve Catanese, Muffy 
Smick, Shiela Roy and Gerry Finn 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 7470. There are 8,538 registered voters, 88% of voters 
voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as 
follows: 







PRECINCT 




ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


PRESIDENT (vote for ONE) 












Johnson and Gray 


18 


13 


19 


21 


71 


Obama and Biden 


892 


831 


908 


817 


3448 


Romney and Ryan 


875 


989 


1054 


946 


3864 


Stein and Honkala 


11 


4 


5 


12 


32 


Write In 


2 


3 


3 


1 


9 


Blanks 


13 


10 


13 


10 


46 
7470 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS (vote for ONE) 












Scott Brown 


1037 


1156 


1238 


1138 


4569 


Elizabeth Warren 


754 


677 


744 


657 


2832 


Write in 





1 








1 


Blanks 


20 


16 


20 


12 


68 
7470 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 












(vote for ONE) 












Sean Bielat 


808 


892 


946 


895 


3541 


Joseph Kennedy, III 


915 


886 


951 


827 


3579 


David Rosa 


38 


20 


40 


40 


138 


Write In 


3 


1 








4 


Blanks 


47 


51 


65 


45 


208 
7470 



COUNCILLOR (vote for ONE) 



260 



Robert Jubinville 


702 


658 


716 


684 


Earl Sholley 


785 


889 


960 


848 


Write In 


2 








1 


Blanks 


182 


211 


194 


154 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 










(vote for ONE) 










James Timilty 


985 


945 


1030 


858 


Jeffrey Robert Bailey 


654 


694 


778 


794 


Write In 


2 








1 


Blanks 


182 


211 


194 


154 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 
COURT 
(vote for ONE) 

Denise C Garlick (P 1 & 2 
Daniel B Winslow (P 3 & 4) 
Write In 
Blanks 

CLERK OF COURTS (vote for One) 
Walter F Timilty, Jr 
Write In 
Blanks 

REGISTER OF DEEDS (vote for One) 
William O'Donnell 
Write In 
Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (vote for 

TWO) 

John Gillis 

Francis O'Brien 

Write In 

Blanks 

QUESTION 1 -Auto Repair 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

261 



2760 

3482 

3 

741 

7470 



3818 

2908 

3 

741 

7470 



1285 


1297 


1440 


1287 




8 


16 


11 


11 


46 


518 


537 


551 


509 


2115 
7470 


1237 


1260 


1345 


1179 


5021 


10 


13 


9 


6 


38 


564 


577 


648 


622 


2411 
7470 


1254 


1279 


1349 


1190 


5072 


8 


9 


7 


6 


30 


549 


562 


646 


611 


2368 
7470 


880 


849 


884 


826 


3439 


909 


950 


1018 


910 


3787 


10 


15 


8 


5 


38 


1823 


1886 


2094 


1873 


7676 
14940 


1396 


1414 


1527 


1401 


5738 


186 


194 


220 


198 


798 


229 


242 


255 


208 


934 
7470 



QUESTION 2 - Death With Dignity 

Yes 


862 


825 


902 


854 


3443 


No 


863 


944 


1009 


877 


3693 


Blanks 


86 


81 


91 


76 


334 
7470 


QUESTION 3 - Medicinal Marijuanna 
Yes 


1018 


988 


1067 


990 


4063 


No 


700 


779 


851 


751 


3081 


Blanks 


93 


83 


84 


66 


326 
7470 


QUESTION 4-POLITICAL FINANCE (PI 

&2) 
Yes 


1088 


1041 






2129 


No 


357 


431 






788 


Blanks 


366 


379 






744 
3661 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



262 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2012 



263 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 

2011, 2012 and 2013 



2011 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 

Total Real and Personal Property 



Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



2012 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 

Total Real and Personal Property 



Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



2013 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 

Total Real and Personal Property 



Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



4089 



146 

43 

76 


$2,117,748,105.00 

$0.00 

$67,705,845.00 

$27,214,700.00 

$33,440,500.00 


4354 


$2,246,109,150.00 




$33,736,559.43 

$197,252.43 

$15.02 


4098 

137 
43 
80 


$2,107,531,401.00 

$0.00 

$68,446,270.00 

$27,007,200.00 

$33,143,800.00 


4358 


$2,236,128,671.00 




$35,174,304.00 

$199,631.36 

$15.73 


4106 


$2,123,142,245.00 


126 
43 
70 


$68,627,155.00 
$27,346,500.00 
$32,381,600.00 


4345 


$2,251,497,500.00 




$36,008,414.66 

$227,630.14 

$15.73 



264 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes Receivable as of June 30, 2012 



Fiscal Year 
2012 
2011 
2010 
2009 



Real Estate Personal Property 

374,467 1,397 

68,883 1,429 

29,087 428 

21,827 1,071 



Excise Tax 

42,683 

11,634 

6,369 





Prior Years 



21,745 



5,795 



Tax Title 



75,338 



Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, 
Treasurer/Collector 



265 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Statement of Cash 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2012 

Including investment returns $55,758,633.26 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 2012 

Including reinvestments $56,33 1 ,488.59 

Cash Balance on June 30, 2012 $18,536,813.91 

General Fund 

Statement of Investments 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments with MMDT June 30, 2012 $2,671,308.45 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 2012 $21,208,122.36 
General Fund 

Statement of Interest Received on Savings/Investments-General Fund 

General Fund $154,879.26 

Pooled Investment Fund $7,015.36 



Total Interest Earned in Fiscal 2012 $161,894.62 



Outstanding Debt Accounts June 30, 2012 

Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 1,865,900 

Sewers 5,510,467 

School Construction 695,500 

Library Renovation 455,600 

Health Septic Loan (MWPAT) 33,022 

Additional School Roofs 249,000 

HS/Middle School/Memorial Constr. 1 7,990,800 

Adult Community Center 2,0 1 0,000 



266 



Non-Exclusion: 

Adult Community Center 1 00,000 

Town Hall Renovation 582,000 

Cap Landfill 207,300 

Athletic Facilities 

School Lift Installation 50,000 

Land Acquisitions 1,063,750 

DPW 55,000 

Fire Truck 250,000 



Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 332,700 

Flotation Thickeners 400,000 

Water Main Repairs-Green St. 1 ,400,000 

Water Treatment Plant 1 1 ,200 

Causeway Water Main 368,000 

WWTP Improvements 1,455,500 

Forest St. Water Main 96,660 

1 1 Reduction-MWPAT 879, 1 09 

Granite Street Water Main 340,000 

Total Long Term Debt (principal only) $40,332,907 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, CMMT 
Treasurer/Collector 



267 



TOWN TREASURER 
TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $4,043 ,893 .92 

Conservation 47,853.46 

Stabilization 219,748.88 

Special Unemployment Insurance 156,255.71 

Library Trusts 29,016.95 

Granville Dailey-Library 84,563.28 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 78,464.56 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 875,877.99 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 2,354.16 

Municipal Insurance 302,142.23 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 143,879.91 

Council on Aging 2,851 .73 

Catherine Bell Library Trust 273,876.25 

Stabilization- Advanced Sewer Bet. Payments 2,054,340.62 

Moses Ellis Post #1 17 G.A.R. 14,535.16 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 6,428.43 

Tri-Centennial Trust 3,868.58 

School Essay Fund 5,396.80 

Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 65,187.85 

Dela Park Acres Trust 15,561.81 

Cedarview Acres 20,744.52 

Carruth Sewer District 7,842.24 

Maude Washburn Trust Fund 5,264.2 1 

Playground Trust 6.85 

Elderly and Disabled Trust 784.07 

375 th Anniversary Trust 1 ,502.28 

Stabilization-OPEB 268,62 1 .57 

268 



Elizabeth Busconi Trust 37, 142.2 1 

J.M. McCormick Scholarship Trust __35>_077.67 

Balance of June 30, 2012 $8,803,083.90 



Respectfully submitted, 



Georgia K. Colivas, CCMT 
Treasurer/Collector 



269 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET FOR 2012 PERI 3 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



FUND: 01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



ASSETS 



01 101000 CASH 

01 121005 2005 PP TAX RECBL 

01 1 2 1 006 2006 PP TAX RECBL 

01 121007 2007 PP TAX RECBL 

01 121008 2008 PERSONAL PROPERTY TX RECB 

01 121009 2009 PERSONAL PROPERTY TX RECB 

01 121010 2010 PERSONAL PROPERTY TX RECB 

01 121011 2011 PERSONAL PROPERTY TX RECB 

01 121012 2012 PERSONAL PROP TX RECB 

01 122000 2000 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

01 122001 2001 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

1 1 22002 2002 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

1 122006 2006 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

01 122008 2008 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH5 9 

01 122009 2009 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

01 122010 2010 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

01 122011 2011 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

01 122012 2012 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

01 123005 PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2005 

01 123006 PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2006 

01 123007 PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2007 

01 123008 PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2008 

01 123009 PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2009 

01 1 230 1 PROV FOR AB ATE/EXEMP-20 1 

01 123011 PROV FOR AB ATE/EXEMP-20 11 

01 123012 PROV FOR AB ATE/EXEMP-20 12 

01 124000 TAX TITLE RECBL 

01 125300 DEFTAXRECBLch59s5cl41A 

01 1 26 1 1 20 1 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

01 126111 2011 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

01 126112 2012 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

1 1 34002 AMB CHG BILLING AGENCY RECBL 

1 1 36000 POLICE SPEC DETAIL RECBL 

01 143101 2001 APP SEW BETTATTX 

01 143102 2002 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

01 1 43 1 03 2003 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

01 143104 2004 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

01 143108 2008 APP SEW BETT ADD TO TAX 

01 143111 2011 APP SEW BETT ADD TO TAX 

01 143112 2012 APP SEW BETT ADD TO TAX 

01 143900 COMM INT SB ATTX 

01 143918 APPORT SEW BETT NOT YET DUE 

01 161033 DF CH90 FUND-33 

01 161080 DF TRUST+STAB FD-80 

TOTAL ASSETS 



22,768,993.21 

1,771.01 

1,455.60 

751.97 

1,816.79 

1,071.07 

427.55 

1,428.90 

1,397.67 

1,437.92 

2,294.18 

2,487.72 

2,630.83 

12,895.93 

21,827.00 

29,087.25 

68,882.96 

374,467.24 

-9,906.77 

-16,229.93 

-15,139.30 

-18,981.54 

-62,674.62 

-78,321.39 

-81,521.82 

-82,349.79 

75,337.72 

248,591.57 

6,369.27 

11,633.90 

42,683.19 

177,303.71 

13,148.80 

116.95 

116.95 

116.95 

116.95 

1,928.70 

350.86 

5,913.72 

2,075.47 

4,413,355.13 

147,024.26 

12,225.91 

28,088,409.65 



270 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET FOR 2012 13 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 



LIABILITIES 



01 


120000 


DEF REV-PROP TAX 


-161,006.43 


01 


124001 


DEF REV-TAX TITLE 


-75,337.72 


01 


125301 


DEF REV-DEFERRED TX 


-248,591.57 


01 


126000 


DEF REV-MVE TAX 


-60,686.36 


01 


134100 


DEF REV-AMBULANCE 


-177,303.71 


01 


136100 


DEF REV-POL SPEC DETAIL 


-13,148.80 


01 


143925 


DEF REV-SPECIAL BETT 


-10,736.55 


01 


143926 


DEF REV-SB NOT YET DUE 


-4,413,355.13 


01 


201000 


WARRANTS PAYABLE 


-401,344.86 


01 


202000 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 


231.00 


01 


222200 


PAYR P-VOL LIFE W/H 


-1,592.64 


01 


223000 


PAYR P-HEALTH INS W/H 


-76,972.21 


01 


223100 


PAYR P-BASIC LIFE W/H 


-530.47 


01 


226800 


PAYR P-DENTL INS W/H 


-7,436.22 


01 


227009 


ZON BD RFDBL DEP PAYBL 


-34,104.57 


01 


227010 


PLN BD RFDBL DEP PAYBL 


-4,002.34 


01 


227011 


CONSVTN PROJ DEP PAYBL 


-2,989.42 


01 


238020 


DT SPEC REV FD-20 


-568,273.27 


01 


238021 


DT SPEC REV FD-21 


-385,638.73 


01 


238030 


DT SPEC REV FD-30 


-119,934.49 


01 


238031 


DT SPEC REV FD-3 1 


-760,781.06 


01 


238032 


DT SPEC REV FD-32 


-389,251.51 


01 


238040 


DT CAP PROJ FD-40 


-456,246.80 


01 


238060 


DT WATER ENTR FD-60 


-301,595.69 


01 


238061 


DT SEWER ENTRFD-61 


-622,109.04 


01 


238069 


DT HEA INS INTNL SVC FD-69 


-134,003.54 


01 


252000 


TAILINGS PAYABLE-PAYRL 


-51,077.16 


01 


252010 


TAILINGS PAYABLE-VW 


-7,972.35 




TOTAL LIABILITIES 


-9,485,791.64 


BALANCE 








01 


324001 


F/B R-ENCUMBRANCE 


-1,353,920.45 


01 


324002 


F/B R-RES EXP-SP ART 


-834,686.43 


01 


324006 


F/B R-CAPITAL BUDGET 


-12,801.00 


01 


328000 


F/B R-DBT EXCL-SB REV 


-197,434.87 


01 


329600 


F/B RES REDUC FUTR EXCL DEBT 


-490,051.13 


01 


329601 


F/B R- REDUC EXCL DEBT MSBA GR 


-12,218,885.00 


01 


329602 


F/B R-MSBA GR EXCL DEBT COSTS 


-360,327.80 


01 


333000 


F/B R-EXPEND FR F C 


-500,000.00 


01 


359000 


F/B UNRESERVED 


-2,634,511.33 




TOTAL FUND BALANCE 

TOTAL LIABILITIES + FUND BALANCE 


-18,602,618.01 




-28,088,409.65 



* FREE CASH CERTIFIED $2,269, 1 54 



271 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 20 - School Grants 

Fiscal Year 2012 



Account 
Number 

20-004 
20-007 
20-008 
20-014 
20-035 
20-042 
20-045 
20-047 
20-049 
20-050 
20-051 
20-053 
20-054 
20-055 
20-057 



Account Title 



School 
Fund 



06/30/12 



S-Community Partnership Gr 


86 


8,183.91 


F-Title VIB-Early Childhood 


79 


0.44 


F-TitleVIB-941142 


77/78 


(4,660.29) 


F-SPED Supprtg Access to Curr 


74 


(5,595.56) 


S-Subsidiary Agreement Grant 


88 


62,211.54 


S-Academic Supp Serv Grant 


35 


349.20 


F-Teacher Quality Grant 


37 


15,305.78 


S-Circuit Breaker Progr 


83 


463,692.10 


S-Graduation Safety Grant 


46 


250.00 


S-Compass School 


47 


46.12 


S-Title 1 Distr 


75 


1,977.16 


F-ARRA-IDEA 


85 


0.04 


F-ARRA/EEC 


73 


0.04 


S-K-12 Literacy Grant 


71 


9,203.07 


F-Education Jobs Support 


89 


17,309.72 


Total School Grant's 




568,273.27 



Total Federal 

Total State 

Total School Grants 



24,337.33 
543,935.94 

568,273.27 



272 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 21- School Revolving Ac's 

Fiscal Year 2012 

Account School 

Number Account Title Fund 06/30/12 



21-003 


School Athletic Revolving 


21/22 


63,455.21 


21-004 


Adult Education 


24/25 


54,582.67 


21-006 


Tuition Revolving 


27 


55,269.90 


21-011 


School Rentals 


41 


42,300.36 t 


21-016 


School Intramurals(clubs) 


23 


26,183.80 


21-019 


Mid Schl Interscholastic(sports) 


20 


441.79 


21-020 


Community Partnerhip 


26 


481.37 


21-021 


MEDF Coalition for Public Ed. 


40 


33,778.55 


21-024 


Before/After School Care 


19 


29,877.46 


21-027 


Extracurricular Activity ac 


17 


2,835.00 


21-028 


H S Parking Revolving ac 


18 


27,765.00 



Subtotal 336,97 



21-001 School Lunch 95 42,104.67 

21-012 Voluntary Local Education 6,562.95 

Subtotal 48,667.62 



Grand Total 385,638.73 



273 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 30 - Town Grants 

Fiscal Year 2012 



Account 
Number 



Account Title 



06/30/12 



30-002 


P 


COA MCHF-ARCP Gr 


4,357.95 


30-006 


S 


Police Drug Education 


691.04 


30-016 


F 


Libr LSTA 'On the Same Page' Gr 


58.23 


30-020 


S 


Title V Public Info. Gr. 


3,016.39 


30-021 


s 


ARCP Serv Incent Gr-Transportation 


1,000.00 


30-024 


s 


State Aid to Library 


43,754.39 


30-027 


s 


MYO MYAC Mini Grant 


500.00 


30-034 


s 


Water Pollutn Abat-Tit V 


59,910.49 


30-042 


s 


Medfield Arts Council Int. Bearing 


1,961.62 


30-070 


s 


Senior Formula Grant FY05-FY09 


1,790.50 


30-087 


p 


Verizon I-Net Gr FY08-17 


2,293.86 


30-089 


s 


BOH Emer Prep Cnslt 


600.02 



Total 



119,934.49 



Total Federal Grants (F) 

Total State Grants (S) 

Total Private Grants (P) 
Total 



58.23 

113,224.45 

6,651.81 

119,934.49 



274 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 3 1 - Town Revolving 


Ac's 






Fiscal Year 2012 






Account 








Number 


Account Title 




06/30/12 


31-001 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 




306,820.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 




78,350.00 


31-003 


Insurance Reimb <$20,000 




1,069.06 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 




1,125.19 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 




8,015.08 


31-010 


Premium on Debt Exclusion Bonds 


54,238.47 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 




616.53 


31-014 


Tax Refund IRS 




1,445.77 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 




1,814.02 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 




69,553.16 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 




8,959.70 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 




15,777.71 


31-042 


Amb Mileage Fees-Billing Agency 


75,036.50 


31-048 


Deputy Coll Fees Ac 




306.26 


31-050 


Sew Install Engineering Study 




800.00 


31-051 


Community Gardens ch44s53 e 


1/2 


2,582.84 


31-053 


Center(COA) Rental Rev 53 e 1/2 


9,530.18 


31-054 


L Copy/Rntl/Damg Matl Rev 53 


I el/2 


2,756.04 


31-055 


COA ARCP Fee Revolv ac 53 e 


1/2 


730.80 



Total 



639,527.31 



Deposits rec'd in advance for P&R summer progr 121,253.75 
Fund Balance 760,781.06 



275 





Town of Medfield 






Fund 32- Gift A/c's 






Fiscal Year 2012 




Account 




Balance 


Number 


Account Title 


06/30/12 


32-001 


Cable Access Gift 


100.00 


32-002 


Fire Gift 


862.43 


32-003 


Dwight Derby House Gift 


1,000.00 


32-004 


Civil Defense gift 


2,504.18 


32-008 


Council on Aging Gift 


38,938.83 


32-013 


Drug Wages Norwood Gift 


397.46 


32-014 


Historical Commission Gift 


34.00 


32-015 


Long Range Planning Gift 


447.00 


32-016 


Comm to Study Memorials Gift 


11,203.44 


32-018 


Memorial Day Gift 


166.63 


32-020 


Outreach Gift 


6,004.30 


32-025 


Town Meeting Gift 


75.00 


32-027 


Ambulance Gift 


1,328.53 


32-028 


Library Gift 


36,505.76 


32-030 


Grist Mill Gift 


21,709.66 


32-031 


Town Common Gift 


2,531.06 


32-035 


Dare Police Donations 


36.08 


32-038 


COA TRIAD Gift 


4,971.44 


32-039 


Library Book/Materials Gift 


13,996.42 


32-041 


Kennel Operations Gift 


2,756.01 


32-043 


Arts/Cult Council Gift-Est 3/02 


864.91 


32-044 


Entering Medfield Sign Gift ac 


2,000.00 


32-046 


COA MACC Furn/Equi/Access Gift 


3,160.70 


32-047 


Downtown Study Gift 


1,704.93 


32-048 


Fiberoptic Gift- WAN 


2,539.15 


32-050 


Police Gift 


1,495.80 


32-051 


COA Driver Salary Gift 


121.15 


32-052 


Spr St Gas Stn Eng Gift 


1,638.31 


32-053 


COA Gift fr Jenks Jr 


46,873.24 


32-054 


Hospital Cemetery Maint Gift 


430.00 




Total Town 


206,396.42 



276 





School Gifts-Fd30 




32-300 


System Wide Gift 


144,870.03 


32-301 


Central Office 


99.99 


32-302 


Pupil Service 


6,922.21 


32-311 


Dale Street School Gift 


2,783.77 


32-312 


Wheelock School Gift 


5,026.47 


32-313 


Memorial School Gift 


193.81 


32-321 


Blake Middle School Gift 


18,193.77 


32-331 


High School Gift 


4,765.04 




Total School 


182,855.09 




Grand Total 


389,251.51 



277 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 33 -Chapter 90 

Fiscal Year 2012 



Account 

Number Account Title 



Ending Balance 
6/30/2012 



33-01 1 North+Green St Design $235k $288k 
33-017 Mack Truck Six Wheeler $145.5k 16/11 



3> (7, 1 67.26) Expenditure driven grant 

$ (139,857.00) Spend first get reimb later 



Total 

CH90 reimb request for $7,167.26 9/21/12 cash rec'd 10/31/12 
CH90 reimb request for $139,857 2/9/12 cash rec'd 9/13/12 



$ (147,024.26) 







Town of Medfield 








Fund 90 - Other Agency Fund 






Student Activity Accounts 






Fiscal Year 2012 




Account 






Balance 


Number 


Acccount Title 




6/30/2012 


90-311 


Dale Street School 




4,079.41 


90-312 


Wheelock School 




2,614.37 


90-313 


Memorial School 




2,706.93 


90-321 


Middle School 




98,797.37 


90-331 


High School 




151,227.27 




Total 




259,425.35 



Respectfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto, CGA 
Town Accountant 



278 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 201 2 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 

USER CHARGES $ 1,343,673 

TOTAL WATER REVENUES $ 1,343,673 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60-410-1 AND 60-410-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 302,827 

OPERATIONS $ 535,287 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

$ 



APPROPRIATED IN CAPITAL BUDGET FROM WATER FREE CASH 

201 1 FORD EXPLORER (20% SHARE) $ 6,260 

SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT COSTS $ 844,374 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 189,864 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 56,313 



TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 246,177 



INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 



$ 


70,798 


$ 


43,960 


$ 


129,800 


$ 


8.564 



TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES $ 499,299 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES (1,343,673) 

ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) $ 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY: 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS $ 1 ,343,673 

LESS: TOTAL COSTS $ (1,343,673) 

LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT $ 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND: 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FY 12 WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 



$ 


. 


$ 


1,337,413 


$ 


- 


$ 


6,260 


$ 


- 


$ 


1,343,673 



0-10,000 

10,001-35,000 

35,001 - 70,000 

OVER 70,000 GALLONS 



$28.23 
$2.49 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$3.96 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$5.62 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 



279 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2012 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 
TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 



1,409,662 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 61-420-1 AND 61-420-2: 

PERSONNEL 

OPERATIONS 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

- INFILTRATION INFLOW 

- RAW SEWERAGE PUMP 



223,090 
648,250 



$ 50,000 
$ 30,000 



APPROPRIATED IN CAPITAL BUDGET FROM SEWER FREE CASH 
201 1 FORD EXPLORER (20% SHARE) 



6,260 



$ 


157,987 


$ 


78,044 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


40,577 


$ 


37,391 


$ 


129,800 


$ 


6,763 



SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT COSTS 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 
INTEREST 01-751-2 
STATE LOAN BONDG COST/ORIG FEE 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 

CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY : 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 



GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND : 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 



237,531 



$ 


(1,409,662) 


$ 


- 


$ 


1,409,662 


$ 


(1,409,662) 


$ 


- 


$ 


$ 


1,403,402 


$ 




$ 


6,260 


$ 





1,409,662 



FY12SE W1-K LN 1 1 IM'KISI. KA I I S I Rl K I I H'l: 



RESIDENTIAL 



0-10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

COMMERCIAL 



0- 10,000 
10,001 AND OVER 
SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEEIS1 10.00/1,00'. 



BASED ON 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$80.82 EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$8.25 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
BASED ON 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$80.82 EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$8.25 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 



280 



WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 
UNDER MASS GENERAL LAWS, CH 40/SECTION 39K 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 20 12 

WATER 

Total Services 3,934 

Added Services 23 

Thousand Gallons Pumped 485,100 

Thousand Gallons Sold 327,394 

Water Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 38,214 

Water Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 263,382 certified 

SEWER 

Total Services 2,211 

Added Services 37 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 153,535 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 468,574 certified 



281 



PERPETUAL CARE 2012 

Anthony Centore $2,200 

Robert McCarthy $2,200 

Andrew & Regina Wilkinson $550 

Christine Somers $550 
Thomas & Natalie Langley Transfer From Farrar 

Josephine Delfino $2,200 

Raymond E. Beard $2,200 

Barbara Carlisle $2,200 

Kenneth & Margaret Arnold $2,200 

Francis Iafolla & Martha Moon $2,200 

Robert & Rose Marie Farrell $2,200 

James Harris $2,200 

Thomas & Judith Sweeney $2,200 

Robert Tammaro $550 

Donald & Lisa Nyren $2,200 

William & Judith Mohan $2,200 

Fred & Roberta Johnson $2,200 

James & Kerry Morgan $2,200 

Leslie Kleczek $2,200 

Richard & Evelyn Clarke $2,200 

Jessie Portmann $2,200 

Robert & Lynn Tannler $2,200 

Mary Ann Morgan Stetson $3,300 

Francisco & Anna Pecorelli $2,200 

Daniel and Susan Woodman $3,000 

Gabriele & Warner G. Harrison $3,000 

Robert & Renee Taylor $ 1 ,500 

Janet MacGinnis $750 

TOTAL $55,000 



282 



MEDFIELD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




k" — : j 

Lawrence E. Abar 

1968-1972 



1 



i 



l J 

Herbert B. Burr 

1955-1958 




Arthur J. Farrar 

1973-1976 




k ,_ , d 

John F. Ganley 

1990-1993 



R 



& 



Charles F. Allen 

1935-1937 




Kenneth M. 
Childs, Jr. 

1981-1985 




Mark L. Fisher 

2008-Present 




k U 

Charles W. Haigh 

1934-1937 
1940-1946 




S> 






.•^ 




,;^: 



an 



L A 

R. Edward Beard 

1975-1981 



J* 



■ 



Austin C. Buchanan 

1959-1968 




l ra *? ■ — -j 

Richard G. Connors Richard P. DeSorgher 

1964-1967 1980-1983 




. ,.*■■■■ . li 
^ '"■■\k . ;i 



It A 

Walter M. Frank 

1967-1970 



, 



Robert H. Fraser 

1941-1943 




k — J 

Frank G. Haley 

1927-1954 




1^ J "^ 

John T. Harney 
1994-2000 



283 





Harry A. Kelleher 

1968-1977 

r *% 



Weston G. Kosti 

1970-1973 

r __^.i 




v 




& A ir~~ " —ji 

Joseph L. Marcionette William E. McCarthy Sandra G. Munsey 

1947-1964 1971-1975 1946-1955 1977-1980 



Edward R. Perry 

1963-1966 



* 




Osier L. Peterson Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

2000 to Present 1988-1994 




IT— —j 

Robert J. Larkin 

1981-1990 

r. -*i 




k™ ™ -— ^i 

William F. Nourse 
1985-1988 

r i 




IT A 

Clarence A. Purvis 

1996-1999 




L A 

William R. Reagan 

1976-1981 







IT" —A 

Paul B. Rhuda 

1999-2008 




L J 

Joseph A. Roberts 

1954-1963 




m j 

Ann B. Thompson 

1983-Present 



284 



INDEX 

Elected Town Officers 4 

Appointments By 

Fire Chief 12 

Health, Board of. 12 

Moderator 12 

Planning Board 12 

School Committee 11 

Selectmen, Board of 11 

Treasurer/Collector 11 

Warrant Committee 12 

Town Department Reports 

Aging, Council on 95 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 42 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 28 

Assessors, Board of. 30 

Bay Colony Rail Trail Study Committee 99 

Conservation Commission 49 

Energy Committee 52 

Fire Department 38 

Facts about Medfield 3 

Health, Board of 80 

Historical Commission 55 

Historic District Commission 59 

Housing Authority 92 

InMemoriam 1 

Inspection Department 44 

Library Trustees 67 

Lyme Disease Study Committee 90 

Medfield Emergency Management Agency 37 

Memorial Day Address 76 

Memorial Public Library 63 

Memorials, Committee to Study 70 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 105 

Norfolk County Registry of Deeds 114 

Parks and Recreation Commission 97 

Personnel Board 32 



Town Department Reports (continued) 

Planning Board 25 

Police Department 34 

Public Works Department 18 

Sealer Of Weights and Measures 48 

Selectmen, Board of. 15 

State and Federal Representatives 2 

Town Clock, Keepers of 62 

Tri County Regional Vocation Technical School District 117 

Tree Warden and Insect Pest Control 102 

Three Rivers Interlocal Council 103 

Veteran's Services 73 

Water and Sewerage Board 22 

School Department Reports 

School Committee 133 

Superintendent of Schools 137 

Staff Directory 139 

Director of Finance and Operations 159 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 161 

Graduation Exercises, High School 165 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 176 

Ralph Wheelock School 183 

Memorial School 187 

Pupil Services Department 192 

Athletic Director 196 

Community Education Program 204 

Town Clerk's Records 

Marriages 207 

Deaths 209 

Town Meeting and Elections 

Warrant for Presidential Primary, March 6 th 2012 210 

Annual Town Election, March 26 th 2012 216 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, April 30 th 2012 219 

State Primary, September 6 th 2012 248 

State Election, November 6 th 2012 253 



Financial Reports 

Assessors, Board of. 264 

Collector of Taxes 265 

Perpetual Care 282 

Town Accountant 270 

Treasurer 266 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 281 



ig^l 



o